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9th Circuit Will Revisit "Innocence of Muslims" Takedown Order

NotSanguine Re: Hope it won't happen in USA, again ! (158 comments)

While it's true that Sadam's military was full of essentially modern day Nazis, [...]

Saddam was not a nazi. He held a iron grip over muslim factions that can't help but to kill each other. And that is exactly what they did once Saddam was removed.

Saddam Hussein was not a model leader but he was a 'moderate' if such a thing can exist in the islamic word. He also was the only one able to control all these retarded Muslim and keep them from murdering each other. He also was the only one capable of protecting the iraqis minority of other religious faith.

All the claim that he killed babies or gas villages are lies. Not believe the CIA in the 1990s made you a tinfoil-hat'er, still believing them in 2014 make you a fool.

The truth is a bit more complex. The Sunnis weren't all that upset about getting rid of Saddam. What really ticked them off was when L. Paul Bremer disbanded the Iraqi army (sending a couple hundred thousand Sunnis out into the world with no job, no money and guns) and then fired every Sunni in the Iraqi civil service.

Only then did we start to see lots of internecine violence.

Then we brought in Nuri Al-Maliki who systematically discriminated against the Sunnis in all walks of life. Which just made things much, much worse.

It was about economic and political power. Once the U.S.bought off (with huge sums of money) the Shia and the Sunnis, the violence largely stopped. After the flow of money stopped when the U.S. left Iraq, the systematic discrimination by Al-Maliki's government pushed the Sunnis right into the arms of what would become ISIS.

Even that is an oversimplification, but there were failures on all sides, and everyone is a loser.

about a week ago
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Rosetta Results: Comets "Did Not Bring Water To Earth"

NotSanguine Re:Actually... (135 comments)

Well, clearly, if the comet has a higher D/H ratio, and Earth's water came from comets, then much of our deuterium has gone somewhere. Thus proving that the dinosaurs had an advanced technological civilization based on deuterium fusion. Too bad they didn't have a space program capable of deflecting asteroids.

As for comet 103P/Hartley 2, that was probably used as a refueling stop by extraterrestrials.

Finally! Someone with some common sense! Good show, old chap!

about two weeks ago
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Rosetta Results: Comets "Did Not Bring Water To Earth"

NotSanguine Re:Actually... (135 comments)

In the same matter I wish cosmology would create less theories based on on a single observation as one observation can neither prove or disprove theories.

Cosmology didn't claim that this observation proved anything, nor did it spark any new theories. OP made an unsupportable claim in the title. Which is complete hyperbole and not even close to what the researchers reported. Which is why I posted what you replied to.

about two weeks ago
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Rosetta Results: Comets "Did Not Bring Water To Earth"

NotSanguine Re: Actually... (135 comments)

So what they're saying is that WHOOSH.

No argument here.

There. FTFY. Not sure if you were being obtuse in attempt to be amusing or if you're just dumb as a box of rocks. Either way, have a wonderful day!

FTFY

I see. so you subscribe to my second theory about GP. Gotcha.

about two weeks ago
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Rosetta Results: Comets "Did Not Bring Water To Earth"

NotSanguine Re:Not Possible (135 comments)

Anything is possible. Even time travel into the past (with certain limitations).

No, Time travel to the past isn't possible at all. That would be acting like there is a physical place called the past to travel to which is physically separate from all the moving mass in the universe that we call the Present. That would require constant instantaneous non-big-bang creation of all the mass in the universe over and over again at a Planck-time like interval.. Care to show evidence for that actually happening?

It doesn't matter how some scientists choose to interpret certain equations, they are clearly misinterpreting how they actually relate to reality.

Actually, people a lot smarter than you have posited that it is, in fact, possible. It's quite unlikely, and completely beyond our abilities, but not impossible. Note that I said "possible" not feasible.

about two weeks ago
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Rosetta Results: Comets "Did Not Bring Water To Earth"

NotSanguine Re:Actually... (135 comments)

Isn't it also possible that no comets will have the right D/H ratio due to that fact the there is no guarantee all the comets that hit earth had the same d/h ratio.

Anything is possible. Even time travel into the past (with certain limitations).

However, since the article I linked (and quoted/bolded the relevant text) states that they have sampled a comet that has a composition matching the D/H ratio as found here on Earth, it seems reasonable to conclude that other comets, some of which hit the Earth and some of which did not, have Earthlike D/H ratios.

What is more, since all material in the solar system coalesced from the same molecular cloud that collapsed into our star, there are likely many similarities between objects in the solar system.

N.B. I am not a planetary scientist or an astronomer studying comets, so YMMV.

about two weeks ago
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Rosetta Results: Comets "Did Not Bring Water To Earth"

NotSanguine Re: Actually... (135 comments)

So what they're saying is that comets which formed in proximity to where the sampled comet formed, were not responsible for delivering significant quantities of our water.

No argument here.

There. FTFY. Not sure if you were being obtuse in attempt to be amusing or if you're just dumb as a box of rocks. Either way, have a wonderful day!

about two weeks ago
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If you want to win unconditional surrender at ALL costs, no matter what...

NotSanguine Re:Yes. (42 comments)

'n/t' would have been sufficient after the 'yes', or something along the lines of, 'I am against torture', something in your own words more than the one requested. I don't care what the CIA thinks. I've read all that kind of crap since Nixon. They are 'errand boys, sent by grocery clerks, to collect a bill'...

But thank you for taking your valuable time to respond. I will make a note of it.

In that case, please ignore everything after "Torture is needlessly cruel and isn't productive" and you're welcome. Have a nice day!

about two weeks ago
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An Algorithm To Prevent Twitter Hashtag Degeneration

NotSanguine Re:My first Bennett post. (162 comments)

Since you deigned to post in the comments, I want to make sure that you knew that your posts are partially responsible for my slow departure from slashdot. Your poor writing skills, disorganized thought process and incredibly inane topic choices make your posts mostly unreadable.

I may post comments to your posts in the future. But, as before, it will just be to point out your real value.

I hope you have an awful day filled with uncomfortable itching and open sores. Fuck you.

about two weeks ago
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If you want to win unconditional surrender at ALL costs, no matter what...

NotSanguine Yes. (42 comments)

Torture is needlessly cruel and isn't productive, as the CIA has reported.

From the linked article:

[A]ccording to CIA records, seven of the 39 CIA detainees known to have been subjected to the CIA's enhanced interrogation techniques produced no intelligence while in CIA custody. CIA detainees who were subjected to the CIA's enhanced interrogation techniques were usually subjected to the techniques immediately after being rendered to CIA custody. Other detainees provided significant accurate intelligence prior to, or without having been subjected to these techniques.

Torture produced useful intel less frequently than other methods. Information was volunteered even without the use of torture. But some who might have volunteered useful information were never given the chance, as the CIA showed a predilection for torturing first and asking questions later. And those who were tortured did what they could to end the torment.

While being subjected to the CIA's enhanced interrogation techniques and afterwards, multiple CIA detainees fabricated information, resulting in faulty intelligence. Detainees provided fabricated information on critical intelligence issues, including the terrorist threats which the CIA identified as its highest priorities.
[Emphasis added]

But then, you didn't want to hear that did you? You just wanted everyone to either agree with you or ignore you. Didn't happen this time. Better luck next time, amigo.

about two weeks ago
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Rosetta Results: Comets "Did Not Bring Water To Earth"

NotSanguine Actually... (135 comments)

The more informative article from the ESA website says that the Deuterium/Hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is significantly higher (more than three times, in fact) than that of water found on Earth.

However, The comet in question is not of the same type and composition as *all* comets. In fact, comets (even those that generally share orbits with the one sampled) vary widely in their D/H ratios. As such, the paper does not claim that comets didn't bring water to Earth, merely that comets like the one sampled (comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko) by ROSINA did not bring water to Earth.

From the better TFA:

Previous measurements of the deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratio in other comets have shown a wide range of values. Of the 11 comets for which measurements have been made, it is only the Jupiter-family Comet 103P/Hartley 2 that was found to match the composition of Earth’s water, in observations made by ESA’s Herschel mission in 2011. [Emphasis added]

about two weeks ago
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An Algorithm To Prevent Twitter Hashtag Degeneration

NotSanguine Re:Thought You Should Know... (162 comments)

Let me know when you guys get your site working.

I'm not affiliated with SoylentNews other than as a user. I have no access or control over the site itself.

However, from what I've seen the folks over there seem to be working hard to improve the site.

Assuming you're not a troll (and that's a big assumption based on the idiotic complaint you made), I'm sure that if you offer to help, the folks over there would be happy to have you.

about two weeks ago
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An Algorithm To Prevent Twitter Hashtag Degeneration

NotSanguine Re:Thought You Should Know... (162 comments)

I don't know. I'm not affiliated with SoylentNews other than as a user.

about two weeks ago
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An Algorithm To Prevent Twitter Hashtag Degeneration

NotSanguine Re:TL;DR (162 comments)

TL;DR: Bennett blathers on without much rhyme or reason about something.

There. FTFY

about two weeks ago
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An Algorithm To Prevent Twitter Hashtag Degeneration

NotSanguine Thought You Should Know... (162 comments)

There are no posts from this jackass over at Soylent News.

There are many reasons I now prefer that site over /., but a lack of Bennett Haselton is definitely one of them.

about two weeks ago
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Canadian Agency Drops Cases Rather Than Deal With New Requirements For ISP Info

NotSanguine Re:Frist Psot! (29 comments)

Signed, Lionel Hutz. "Attorney" Slashdot.org

You make me nostalgic for Phil Hartman. he was a gem.

about two weeks ago
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Overly Familiar Sci-Fi

NotSanguine Missing The Point... (368 comments)

TFS says: "Our culture evolves quickly — even going back 100 years would be a difficult transition to get used to"

I don't think that comparison is an apt one. Our culture does evolve quickly, but I'd posit that given the technological culture that's developed over the past 150 years or so, it would be much more difficult to adjust to the culture(s) of the past than of the future. No antibiotics, no ubuiquitous telecommunications infrastructure, much more primitive agricultural techniques, etc., etc., etc.

Unless you presume social, economic and technological collapse (which is possible, I guess) for the future, the world of 500 years from now would be more recognizable to a resident of the early 21st century than the world of even 200 years ago, IMHO.

about two weeks ago
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Overly Familiar Sci-Fi

NotSanguine Exploring Change?pe (368 comments)

I think the premise of the TFA is stupid. Yes, culture changes. And yes, we can incorporate such changes into our stories.

However, It seems to me that the essence of science fiction (or, as Heinlein also called it, "speculative fiction") is to identify a particular change in something. A change in culture, a scientific breakthrough, a technological innovation or some other event or idea, then explore how such a change could impact people, and tell a story which incorporates those implications.

Essentially, it's asking "What if...?" and examining the consequences, in human and technological terms, of the answer.

It's not necessary (in fact, in many cases, it will get in the way of telling the story) to create a completely new culture, unless that culture directly relates to the theme (answering the "What if...?" question) of the story.

about two weeks ago
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IoT Is the Third Big Technology 'Wave' In the Last 50 Years, Says Harvard

NotSanguine Re:Really? (196 comments)

That is mainly a problem if you sign up to get something for free. I don't expect that a company that makes 50 bucks net profit off of a fridge is going to risk their reputation in order to make a tiny bit more money by selling my data.

I'm more worried that the NSA would hack into an accelerometer intended to detect vibrations of the compressor and use it as a microphone to spy on my kitchen.

If you think that manufacturers have such small profit margins, you're kidding yourself. And cross-licensing deals with big data aggregators could be huge money for that scum.

Also, those scenarios aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, friend.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Is Mars One ready to colonize the Red Planet?

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 months ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "A non-profit organization called Mars One announced in 2012 its mission to colonize Mars using existing technologies. Last month, a group with from MIT published a paper which claims that current technologies are insufficient to support humans on Mars for extended periods.

According to Andrew Owens, one of the paper's authors:

It's not that Mars colonization is unfeasible; it is just that technology development will be required to make it feasible.

"

Link to Original Source
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New dates rewrite Neanderthal story

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 4 months ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The BBC reports on research detailing the decline of Neanderthals in Europe. The international research team tested samples from over 400 Neanderthal sites, resulting in a new timeline for the decline and extinction of Homo Neanderthalensis, hinting at a much longer period of coexistence with modern humans. A summary of the research is available on the Nature web site.

From the BBC article:

The results provide the clearest insight yet into the interaction between our ancestors and Neanderthals, when they first encountered each other and why the Neanderthals went extinct, according to the lead researcher, Prof Thomas Higham of the University of Oxford. "I think we can set aside the idea of a rapid extinction of Neanderthals caused solely by the arrival of modern humans. Instead we can see a more complex process in which there is a much longer overlap between the two populations where there could have been exchanges of ideas and culture."

"

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Compromise struck on cellphone unlocking bill

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 5 months ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The US Senate has passed a bill (S.517) today allowing users to unlock their phones when moving to another provider.

From a recent article at thehill.com:

“Consumers should be able to use their existing cell phones when they move their service to a new wireless provider,” Leahy said in a statement. “Our laws should not prohibit consumers from carrying their cell phones to a new network, and we should promote and protect competition in the wireless marketplace,” he said. Grassley called the bipartisan compromise “an important step forward in ensuring that there is competition in the industry and in safeguarding options for consumers as they look at new cell phone contracts.” “Empowering people with the freedom to use the carrier of their choice after complying with their original terms of service is the right thing to do,” he said. The House in February passed a companion bill sponsored on cellphone unlocking from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.).

"

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Forensic Genetics And The Law

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  1 year,19 days

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "C-SPAN Covered the 2013 10th Circuit Bench And Bar Conference in Colorado Springs, CO. While this isn't new (from August, 2013), the topics and issues covered were both interesting and pertinent to many discussions about how DNA technology can be used in legal contexts.

From the site description:

Panelists talked about genetics, forensics, and their use in the criminal justice system and society.They discussed the DNA evidence routinely used in criminal cases as well as in investigations of mass graves, missing persons, and for identification.After the break, Nita Farahany talked about how behavior sciences impact the legal system, and Hank Greely talked about whole genome sequencing, the implications of pre-natal genetic testing, and the privacy and ethical issues raised when everyone’s genomes are known and stored.Speakers used PowerPoint during their presentations.Images included skeletons, mass graves, and DNA sources.Panelists responded to questions from members of the audience after their individual presentations and as a group.

"

Link to Original Source
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Network Solutions Outage?

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year and a half ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Network Solutions, Inc. DNS servers are not responding to name resolution requests. The corporate website (http://www.networksolutions.com) appears to be down as well.

Has anyone else seen these issues, or have any information as to what may be going on?"
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Some of My Best Friends Are Germs

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year and a half ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Michael Pollan of the New York Times writes:

I can tell you the exact date that I began to think of myself in the first-person plural — as a superorganism, that is, rather than a plain old individual human being. It happened on March 7. That’s when I opened my e-mail to find a huge, processor-choking file of charts and raw data from a laboratory located at the BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As part of a new citizen-science initiative called the American Gut project, the lab sequenced my microbiome — that is, the genes not of “me,” exactly, but of the several hundred microbial species with whom I share this body. These bacteria, which number around 100 trillion, are living (and dying) right now on the surface of my skin, on my tongue and deep in the coils of my intestines, where the largest contingent of them will be found, a pound or two of microbes together forming a vast, largely uncharted interior wilderness that scientists are just beginning to map.
...
Justin Sonnenburg, a microbiologist at Stanford, suggests that we would do well to begin regarding the human body as “an elaborate vessel optimized for the growth and spread of our microbial inhabitants.”

I, for one, welcome our (not so) new bacterial overlords."
Link to Original Source

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A Trail of Clicks, Culminating in Conflict

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Technology companies are up in arms about the FTC's pending rules change which would require explicit parental permission allowing websites to gather a wide range of data on children 13 and under.

From the NYT Article:


“If adopted, the effect of these new rules would be to slow the deployment of applications that provide tremendous benefits to children, and to slow the economic growth and job creation generated by the app economy,” Catherine A. Novelli, vice president of worldwide government affairs at Apple, wrote in comments to the agency.

But would that be a bad thing? As reported in the New York Times last week, Matt Richtel of the NYT writes:

There is a widespread belief among teachers that students’ constant use of digital technology is hampering their attention spans and ability to persevere in the face of challenging tasks, according to two surveys of teachers being released on Thursday.

So, will the new FTC rules end up helping children (by enhancing their privacy and, if industry pundits are right, reducing the amount of content available online for children — thus enhancing their attention spans), or will the negative effects on corporations have as deleterious an effect on the economy as to measurably reduce the quality of education?"
Link to Original Source

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Official Stirs Texas City With Talk of Rebellion

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Manny Fernandez of the NY Times writes:

LUBBOCK, Tex. — A hearing on a proposed tax increase had just started at the county courthouse here Monday when Grace Rogers, a retired teacher, addressed local leaders. Ms. Rogers said she supported the idea of increasing the property tax to 34.6 cents per $100 valuation from 32.9 cents to finance the hiring of additional sheriff’s deputies — with one reservation. It was that, she said, “it does not fund a paramilitary to create an insurrection and rebellion against the United States.”

County Judge Tom Head is calling for the tax increase as he is concerned (or so he told Texas broadcaster Fox34) that If President Obama is re-elected, we should expect cvil unrest and that the president would send in United Nations troops to pacify the populace. Monies from the tax increase would be used to pay for “...trained, equipped, seasoned veteran officers..." to fend off the blue helmeted invaders."
Link to Original Source

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Ask Slashdot: Quality FOSS/Commercial Enterprise Printer Client Management

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "We are nearing completion of Windows 7 (x64) images for our VDI and physical devices. Our Windows XP images included an in-house developed printer installation tool accessible to end-users.

This tool (written in VB6) will not run without installing a whole bunch of ancient libraries. As such, we'd like to obtain a new tool.
Management does not want to expend resources on scripting a new tool or updating the old one.

The environment consists of Windows systems in an Active Directory environment without print servers.
All printer assignments would be direct IP connections to the (mostly) HP printers.

I know there are a number of commercial tools out there, but I have no experience with them and competent reviews (AFAICT) are far and few between.

Do any /.ers out there have any recommendations for FOSS or commercial Windows printer client management tools with end-user interfaces?

Required Features:
1. Display available printers (preferably from data stored in AD)
2. Automated install of user requested printers and drivers (stored on a shared network resource)
3. Centralized management of printer/driver resources
4. Web or GUI-based for non-technical users


Nice to have features:
1. Remote client management of printer definitions
2. Remote batch installation/change/remove functions


Any suggestions, recommendations or information would be greatly appreciated!"
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Justice Dept., FBI to review use of forensic evidence in thousands of cases

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "From The Washington Post Article:

The Justice Department and the FBI have launched a review of thousands of criminal cases to determine whether any defendants were wrongly convicted or deserve a new trial because of flawed forensic evidence, officials said Tuesday. The undertaking is the largest post-conviction review ever done by the FBI. It will include cases conducted by all FBI Laboratory hair and fiber examiners since at least 1985 and may reach earlier if records are available, people familiar with the process said. Such FBI examinations have taken place in federal and local cases across the country, often in violent crimes, such as rape, murder and robbery.

"

Link to Original Source
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Spearheads and DNA Point to a Second Founding Society in North America

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "In a follow up to my earlier post, the New York Times reports that a team from the University of Oregon has published a paper (paywalled) detailing recent finds in caves near Paisley, Oregon that point to non-Clovis people living in the area at the same time that the Clovis People inhabited North America. From the New York Times article:
"Stone spearheads and human DNA found in Oregon caves, anthropologists say, have produced firmer evidence that these are the oldest directly dated remains of people in North America. They also show that at least two cultures with distinct technologies — not a single one, as had been supposed — shared the continent more than 13,000 years ago.""

Link to Original Source
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Earliest Americans Arrived in Waves, DNA Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Nicholas Wade of the New York Times writes:

North and South America were first populated by three waves of migrants from Siberia rather than just a single migration, say researchers who have studied the whole genomes of Native Americans in South America and Canada.
Some scientists assert that the Americas were peopled in one large migration from Siberia that happened about 15,000 years ago, but the new genetic research shows that this central episode was followed by at least two smaller migrations from Siberia, one by people who became the ancestors of today’s Eskimos and Aleutians and another by people speaking Na-Dene, whose descendants are confined to North America

The study, published online (this is a paywalled site, sorry.) investigated geographic, linguistic and genetic diversity in native American populations."
Link to Original Source

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Florida accused of concealing worst tuberculosis outbreak in 20 years

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The state of Florida has been struggling for months with what the Centers for Disease Control describe as the worst tuberculosis outbreak in the United States in twenty years.

Although a CDC report went out to state health officials in April encouraging them to take concerted action, the warning went largely unnoticed and nothing has been done. The public did not even learn of the outbreak until June, after a man with an active case of TB was spotted in a Jacksonville soup kitchen.

The Palm Beach Post has managed to obtain records on the outbreak and the CDC report, though only after weeks of repeated requests. These documents should have been freely available under Florida’s Sunshine Law."

Link to Original Source
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Moody's Cuts Credit Ratings of 15 Big Banks

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Moody's Investor's Service says they're concerned about risks to the big (including the "too big to fail") banks. Predictably, the banks try to deflect the issue by claiming that Moody's is living in the past and all that risky stuff should be considered water under the bridge. So which is it? Are the banks still engaging in risky activities which could give us a repeat of 2008, or is Moody's just looking to shake down the banks?

Or is it both? Where was Moody's during the housing boom? Busy giving high ratings to instruments jam-packed with bad loans. It's kind of hard to trust these guy now, eh?"

Link to Original Source
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Web Sites Shine Light on Petty Bribery Worldwide

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The cost of claiming a legitimate income tax refund in Hyderabad, India? 10,000 rupees.
The going rate to get a child who has already passed the entrance requirements into high school in Nairobi, Kenya? 20,000 shillings.
The expense of obtaining a driver’s license after having passed the test in Karachi, Pakistan? 3,000 rupees.
Such is the price of what Swati Ramanathan calls “retail corruption,” the sort of nickel-and-dime bribery, as opposed to large-scale graft, that infects everyday life in so many parts of the world.

Ms. Ramanathan and her husband, Ramesh, along with Sridar Iyengar, set out to change all that in August 2010 when they started ipaidabribe.com, a site that collects anonymous reports of bribes paid, bribes requested but not paid and requests that were expected but not forthcoming."

Link to Original Source
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Scannable Condoms Allow Users to 'Check-In' During Safe Sex

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Want to take social media to the next level? Chances are you’ve probably never heard of “checking in” when you have sex, or more specifically when you and your partner are engaging in protected sex.

Now you can brag to the world you’ve just got laid by checking in to a new geo-location website with details of where, why, who you used a condom with, and how the “safe sex was”"

Link to Original Source
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Marijuana Smoking Does Not Harm Lungs, Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "A large new government study has found that smoking marijuana on a regular basis, even over many years, does not impair lung function.

The study, abstract here (full JAMA article paywalled), concluded that "Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use was not associated with adverse effects on pulmonary function." By contrast, the researchers found that compared to nonsmokers, marijuana users performed slightly better on lung function tests, though the improvement was minuscule."

Link to Original Source
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Plan to Widen Availability of Morning-After Pill I

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 3 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Wednesday overruled the Food and Drug Administration's decision that emergency contraceptives be sold freely over the counter, including to teenagers 16 years old and younger.

The pill, called Plan B One-Step, has been available without a prescription to women 17 and older, but those 16 and younger have needed a prescription — and still will because of Ms. Sebelius’s decision.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, wrote that all the studies and experts agreed that young women would benefit from having easy access to Plan B.

The agency’s scientists, she wrote, “determined that the product was safe and effective in adolescent females, that adolescent females understood the product was not for routine use, and that the product would not protect them against sexually transmitted disease.”

This is a cabinet officer in a *Democratic* administration, and a female one at that, doing such a blatantly anti-women, anti-choice, anti-good sense thing! Geez Louise!"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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I Made A Foe Today

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 3 months ago

I'm not really sure why. I don't recall ever interacting with that user before. I guess they don't like the things I have to say.

It seems to me that a better way to handle that would be engage me in conversation so we can both explore our views.

At the same time, if that's the way this person feels, I can handle it. If it was me, I'd just ignore them. But if someone wants to expend their energy hating, who am I to say they shouldn't?

I took the easy way out, I guess. I friended the user who made me a foe. I expect that may annoy them, but that's not my problem.

It does feel a little strange, though. After years on /., no one else has done that. Perhaps I'm gaining an (anti)following? Who knows?

It also prompted me to write my first journal entry. I'm not too happy about its content but I really just wanted to talk about this momentous occasion.

I'VE FINALLY MADE THE BIG TIME!!! WOO-HOO!

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