Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Underground Experiment Confirms Fusion Powers the Sun

NotSanguine Re: That's not how science works (60 comments)

"Science never disproves anything any more than it proves anything."

Except for "global warming" and evolution of course.

It's interesting that you use those two examples. There are a variety of scientific (and unscientific) theories regarding "global warming" or "global climate change" which have attained varying levels of acceptance. There is also a widely accepted scientific theory of biological evolution on the Earth.

There is also ample evidence of global warming, as well as ample evidence of biological evolution. The evidence is just that. Collected observations of objective reality.

The number, variety and independent verification of those observations of "global warming" and "biological evolution" make it abundantly clear that they do, in fact, exist. However, the quality and predictive power of the above scientific *theories* might be a topic of some debate.

Collecting those observations and using them to create and improve scientific theories which describe those observations and the processes that cause them is called "science."

Get it now? Oh, and you're welcome.

about an hour ago
top

Underground Experiment Confirms Fusion Powers the Sun

NotSanguine Re:That's not how science works (60 comments)

Somewhat tangentially, in order for a scientific theory(such as proton-proton fusion in the core of the sun) to be considered valid, it must be falsifiable.

Note that a scientific theory is not the same thing as is meant when referring to theory more generally.

Many people make the mistake of equating one to the other, often causing confusion.

1 hour ago
top

South Carolina Student Arrested For "Killing Pet Dinosaur"

NotSanguine Re:My pet dinosaur ate my neighbor (415 comments)

Personally I prefer the Hurdy Gurdy Man.

Cool. However, we were talking about fiction written by L. Sprague deCamp, rather than music. Not sure if that's really comparable.

3 days ago
top

For Microsoft, $93B Abroad Means Avoiding $30B Tax Hit

NotSanguine Re:Citizens United says... (316 comments)

Further, if individuals need to do so, shouldn't corporations as well? Since they are "people" and all. Just sayin'.

3 days ago
top

For Microsoft, $93B Abroad Means Avoiding $30B Tax Hit

NotSanguine Re:Citizens United says... (316 comments)

Of course a US citizen must file with the IRS. I meant you can't collect taxes from citizens of other countries who are working in their own country.

Got you. But others probably don't know that expats (both citizens and green card holders) are required to file US tax returns. This is not true for most other countries. As I understand it, tax payments to the country in which the expat lives are fully tax deductible and most expats end up not paying any US income tax -- but they do have to file, as you noted.

3 days ago
top

For Microsoft, $93B Abroad Means Avoiding $30B Tax Hit

NotSanguine Re:Citizens United says... (316 comments)

Do they want to collect taxes form people who work in other countries? Good luck with that.

Actually, that's the law

4 days ago
top

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

NotSanguine Re:Securing the Internet of Things is easy (105 comments)

" I guess I'm not really clear on your point."

That's OK. We'll just add it to the very long list of things you are not clear on.

Please. Publish that list. Do you really get off on this whole trolling business? My feathers aren't ruffled, I'm not annoyed or upset. More than anything, I'm just amused at the mixture of insults, poorly delineated thoughts and general silliness on your part.

In any case, why don't you go upstairs and raid mom's fridge while I discuss this stuff with the grownups. There's a good boy.

4 days ago
top

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

NotSanguine Re:Securing the Internet of Things is easy (105 comments)

" The whole point of the TCP/IP suite, as well as the DARPA/NSFNet/Internet was to interconnect devices to facilitate communication of people. -implied content added

That's the part you don't quite seem to get. The difference between people and things seems to elude you.

I see. So your premise is that there is no *valid* purpose for computer networks other than to connect people to other people? Okay then. So, you've never heard of Networked Control Systems or automated data transfers or machine generated/updated databases or a myriad of other applications where people are completely irrelevant to the equation.

I'm guessing you're not quite that stupid, so I'm going to assume you're trolling and ignore you. Ciao! Have a great day!

4 days ago
top

South Carolina Student Arrested For "Killing Pet Dinosaur"

NotSanguine Re:My pet dinosaur ate my neighbor (415 comments)

Bonus points for quoting one of my favorite stories.

It is a good one. Although, I'd more highly recommend The Gnarly Man if you haven't read it.

4 days ago
top

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

NotSanguine Re:Securing the Internet of Things is easy (105 comments)

"What is the purpose of connecting anything to a network? To communicate with other devices."

I'm learning something new from a guy with a ridiculously high SlashID now! Up until now I thought that the purpose of the internet was to allow people to communicate! Now I know it is was devices the whole time! RFC822 was just a ruse! That Tim Berners Lee guy? Just trying to throw us off the scent with has damn human readable content ruse! The ability to share documents? Again, it is about the devices sharing, not people! Network printers? Again, nobody was ever supposed to read the shit after it was printed! Yes kid, you are clueless.

Again, I'm not clear on your point. I did get the ad-hominems (thanks for those, by the way -- that was very sweet!). And your attempt to ridicule me for my /. ID was especially humorous. What is more, at 47 years old, it is kind of nice to be called 'kid'.

While having (with appropriate security controls) control systems and other devices connected to a network (note, I did not say "the Internet" although in appropriate circumstances that can be useful too) can be extremely useful, I'm no fan of connecting every damn fool thing to the Internet. There's no reason why I need to monitor my microwave oven (someone might be making popcorn -- that must be stopped!) or make sure that the bleach levels in my washing machine are optimal while I'm at the movies.

Beyond that, go ahead and read the IP, UDP and TCP protocol specifications. I have -- and first did so nearly a decade *before* Berners-Lee, et. al. published the the HTTP protocol specification. The whole point of the TCP/IP suite, as well as the DARPA/NSFNet/Internet was to interconnect devices to facilitate communications. Having read and understood those documents over the last 20+ years, I can say with some confidence that they do not require that connected devices be "general purpose" or "human focused." New applications which take advantage of these protocols are developed all the time.

SMTP and HTTP are applications that ride on top of the TCP/IP suite. They are applications which were developed to enhance the capabilities of interconnected networks. Others, such as the RPC spec are designed specifically for device to device communications.

Leaving aside your sarcasm, ill humor and general negativity, I still don't understand what point you're trying to make. Other than attacking me what, if anything, are you trying to add to this conversation? That's not a veiled slur, I really would like to understand. Please elucidate. Pretty please!

4 days ago
top

South Carolina Student Arrested For "Killing Pet Dinosaur"

NotSanguine Re:My pet dinosaur ate my neighbor (415 comments)

He had bought a gun to take care of business, but really who brings a gun to a dinosaur fight?

Get real. Everyone knows you need A Gun For Dinosaur. I wonder if de Camp was arrested for this story. Sigh.

4 days ago
top

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

NotSanguine Re:Securing the Internet of Things is easy (105 comments)

That was the point actually*, but thanks for playing! *Putting a computer in something doesn't make the thing a computer

That is true. However, just because you embed a computer in something that's not a computer doesn't magically make that embedded computer something else. It's still a computer. And that computer will, assuming it has power applied and some code to execute, compute. I guess I'm not really clear on your point. Please elucidate. Thanks!

4 days ago
top

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

NotSanguine Re:Securing the Internet of Things is easy (105 comments)

2) Those same idiots don't know the difference between an embedded system and a general purpose computer.

Ooh! Ooh! Mr. Kotter! Mr. Kotter! I know the difference! But I'm not sure why that matters. Ask yourself this question (since you clearly haven't done so yet): What is the purpose of connecting anything to a network? To communicate with other devices. Whether those devices are toasters, routers, switches, fondue machines, laptops, automatic tie racks or smart phones is irrelevant. The raison d'etre for network connectivity is the same.

Here's a good question for you. Is a smartphone an embedded device or a general purpose computer? A better question: Does it really matter?

4 days ago
top

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

NotSanguine Re:Securing the Internet of Things is easy (105 comments)

"And these "things" run computers in them."

That sentence doesn't even parse, but no. On a completely unrelated note, please look up the definition of computing*. The intelligent members of the universe thank you. * I'll even give you a hint. Cars aren't computers!

That's true. But How many computers are embedded in cars?.

4 days ago
top

Securing Networks In the Internet of Things Era

NotSanguine Re:will NOT have learned from Target (105 comments)

...(With more and more ways for hostile systems to access "internal" networks directly, network border security is increasingly becoming a useless strategy in general computing as well. Reflection attacks, where compromised internal hosts are used as stepping stones to get to the entire network, have been eating away at border gateway security for a long time anyway.)

Not useless, just not enough. cf. Defense in-depth.

4 days ago
top

When Customer Dissatisfaction Is a Tech Business Model

NotSanguine Re:Free market (257 comments)

By regulation, AC means that there's a state-sponsored oligopoly in place as well as state legislation/local politics making it difficult for start-ups. Regulation may not quite be the best word for it though.

You are correct, sir. That's local service franchising at best, corporate government capture at worst. That's not regulation.

Regulation would be requiring regular upgrades and cost controls.

A real "free market" in internet access would include a standard "last mile" supported with with ISPs paying user fees and competing on price and features, not a market in political influence.

5 days ago
top

When Customer Dissatisfaction Is a Tech Business Model

NotSanguine Re:Free market (257 comments)

No. The execs have realized that they can get fatter paychecks if they eliminate "cost centers" that don't deliver positive cash flow. You know, things like infrastructure upgrades, maintenance and customer service.. Anyone not working in the executive suite is viewed as a liability to the company and needs to be eliminated to reduce the pesky overhead involved in having real employees.

There. FTFY.

5 days ago
top

When Customer Dissatisfaction Is a Tech Business Model

NotSanguine Re:Free market (257 comments)

Over regulation? I'm confused. Please explain about that? At least in the US, ISPs are *less* regulated than ever.

5 days ago
top

FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

NotSanguine Re:double reverse ungood (338 comments)

Please tell me where in the US there are such "free markets" in Internet access? I'd like to move there.

I'm not aware where they don't exist. Competition may be limited in most markets (mostly due to government regulations), but you still have a choice whether you give money to telecoms or not. With municipal telecom services, your taxes will be used to pay for part of the service, whether you want to or not.

Really? The choices I have (and yes, I do have a few) include a service that will not provide me with really high speed access, but will not block my traffic and gives me static IP addresses. The ones that will give me reasonably high speed access will arbitrarily block my traffic and will not provide me with static IP addresses. Yes, I can choose between different *crappy* services, but that's not really competition, because local government has given franchise rights and access to rights-of-way and chosen the winners for me. And I live in one of the most densely populated places in the US.

You are correct (as I implied above) that competition is often stifled by local governments, but that's more often due to regulatory capture and corruption, than regulation itself.

You do realize that even if local governments were to open it all up and say, "have at it boys! Set up your last mile services wherever you like, we want a 'free market'!" that having a half dozen or more companies putting in their own infrastructure (underground and pole mounted cables/fiber, head-end substations, etc, etc, etc) we'd have complete chaos with respect to tearing up the streets, selling rights-of-way, etc. And with all these companies putting in new infrastructure, there invariably will be "accidents" (of the unintentional and intentional types) which will interrupt service for their competition, as well as other unrelated services which share the same rights-of-way. I could go on, but I'm hoping you're starting to get the picture.

Real competition would come from a single, solid, redundant infrastructure providing high speed access to the last mile, with any ISP that wants to provide service to customers paying for access to the last mile and competing on price and features.

You're making the assumption that tax dollars will be used to pay to provide service. With the scenario above, ISP access fees could pay for the maintenance and upkeep of the last mile network, which would include a premium to pay the interest/principal on municipal bonds issued to build out the infrastructure. As time goes by part of that premium can be used for upgrades and enhancements. Given the amount of money the cable companies, LECs and other last mile providers are making, this is completely viable and only those who use the infrastructure would have to pay for it. That would be a free market solution.

Oh, and in case you've been living under a rock for the past 100 years or so, that's (municipal bonds with user fees to cover repayment, maintenance and upgrades) how large public works projects have been successfully done over and over again.

So, Are you a shill for the cable industry, a Grover Norquist lackey, or just uninformed?

5 days ago

Submissions

top

New dates rewrite Neanderthal story

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a week ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The BBC reports on research detailing the decline of Neanderthals in Europe. The international research team tested samples from over 400 Neanderthal sites, resulting in a new timeline for the decline and extinction of Homo Neanderthalensis, hinting at a much longer period of coexistence with modern humans. A summary of the research is available on the Nature web site.

From the BBC article:

The results provide the clearest insight yet into the interaction between our ancestors and Neanderthals, when they first encountered each other and why the Neanderthals went extinct, according to the lead researcher, Prof Thomas Higham of the University of Oxford. "I think we can set aside the idea of a rapid extinction of Neanderthals caused solely by the arrival of modern humans. Instead we can see a more complex process in which there is a much longer overlap between the two populations where there could have been exchanges of ideas and culture."

"

Link to Original Source
top

Compromise struck on cellphone unlocking bill

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a month ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The US Senate has passed a bill (S.517) today allowing users to unlock their phones when moving to another provider.

From a recent article at thehill.com:

“Consumers should be able to use their existing cell phones when they move their service to a new wireless provider,” Leahy said in a statement. “Our laws should not prohibit consumers from carrying their cell phones to a new network, and we should promote and protect competition in the wireless marketplace,” he said. Grassley called the bipartisan compromise “an important step forward in ensuring that there is competition in the industry and in safeguarding options for consumers as they look at new cell phone contracts.” “Empowering people with the freedom to use the carrier of their choice after complying with their original terms of service is the right thing to do,” he said. The House in February passed a companion bill sponsored on cellphone unlocking from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.).

"

Link to Original Source
top

Forensic Genetics And The Law

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 9 months ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "C-SPAN Covered the 2013 10th Circuit Bench And Bar Conference in Colorado Springs, CO. While this isn't new (from August, 2013), the topics and issues covered were both interesting and pertinent to many discussions about how DNA technology can be used in legal contexts.

From the site description:

Panelists talked about genetics, forensics, and their use in the criminal justice system and society.They discussed the DNA evidence routinely used in criminal cases as well as in investigations of mass graves, missing persons, and for identification.After the break, Nita Farahany talked about how behavior sciences impact the legal system, and Hank Greely talked about whole genome sequencing, the implications of pre-natal genetic testing, and the privacy and ethical issues raised when everyone’s genomes are known and stored.Speakers used PowerPoint during their presentations.Images included skeletons, mass graves, and DNA sources.Panelists responded to questions from members of the audience after their individual presentations and as a group.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Network Solutions Outage?

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Network Solutions, Inc. DNS servers are not responding to name resolution requests. The corporate website (http://www.networksolutions.com) appears to be down as well.

Has anyone else seen these issues, or have any information as to what may be going on?"
top

Some of My Best Friends Are Germs

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Michael Pollan of the New York Times writes:

I can tell you the exact date that I began to think of myself in the first-person plural — as a superorganism, that is, rather than a plain old individual human being. It happened on March 7. That’s when I opened my e-mail to find a huge, processor-choking file of charts and raw data from a laboratory located at the BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As part of a new citizen-science initiative called the American Gut project, the lab sequenced my microbiome — that is, the genes not of “me,” exactly, but of the several hundred microbial species with whom I share this body. These bacteria, which number around 100 trillion, are living (and dying) right now on the surface of my skin, on my tongue and deep in the coils of my intestines, where the largest contingent of them will be found, a pound or two of microbes together forming a vast, largely uncharted interior wilderness that scientists are just beginning to map.
...
Justin Sonnenburg, a microbiologist at Stanford, suggests that we would do well to begin regarding the human body as “an elaborate vessel optimized for the growth and spread of our microbial inhabitants.”

I, for one, welcome our (not so) new bacterial overlords."
Link to Original Source

top

A Trail of Clicks, Culminating in Conflict

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Technology companies are up in arms about the FTC's pending rules change which would require explicit parental permission allowing websites to gather a wide range of data on children 13 and under.

From the NYT Article:


“If adopted, the effect of these new rules would be to slow the deployment of applications that provide tremendous benefits to children, and to slow the economic growth and job creation generated by the app economy,” Catherine A. Novelli, vice president of worldwide government affairs at Apple, wrote in comments to the agency.

But would that be a bad thing? As reported in the New York Times last week, Matt Richtel of the NYT writes:

There is a widespread belief among teachers that students’ constant use of digital technology is hampering their attention spans and ability to persevere in the face of challenging tasks, according to two surveys of teachers being released on Thursday.

So, will the new FTC rules end up helping children (by enhancing their privacy and, if industry pundits are right, reducing the amount of content available online for children — thus enhancing their attention spans), or will the negative effects on corporations have as deleterious an effect on the economy as to measurably reduce the quality of education?"
Link to Original Source

top

Official Stirs Texas City With Talk of Rebellion

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Manny Fernandez of the NY Times writes:

LUBBOCK, Tex. — A hearing on a proposed tax increase had just started at the county courthouse here Monday when Grace Rogers, a retired teacher, addressed local leaders. Ms. Rogers said she supported the idea of increasing the property tax to 34.6 cents per $100 valuation from 32.9 cents to finance the hiring of additional sheriff’s deputies — with one reservation. It was that, she said, “it does not fund a paramilitary to create an insurrection and rebellion against the United States.”

County Judge Tom Head is calling for the tax increase as he is concerned (or so he told Texas broadcaster Fox34) that If President Obama is re-elected, we should expect cvil unrest and that the president would send in United Nations troops to pacify the populace. Monies from the tax increase would be used to pay for “...trained, equipped, seasoned veteran officers..." to fend off the blue helmeted invaders."
Link to Original Source

top

Ask Slashdot: Quality FOSS/Commercial Enterprise Printer Client Management

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "We are nearing completion of Windows 7 (x64) images for our VDI and physical devices. Our Windows XP images included an in-house developed printer installation tool accessible to end-users.

This tool (written in VB6) will not run without installing a whole bunch of ancient libraries. As such, we'd like to obtain a new tool.
Management does not want to expend resources on scripting a new tool or updating the old one.

The environment consists of Windows systems in an Active Directory environment without print servers.
All printer assignments would be direct IP connections to the (mostly) HP printers.

I know there are a number of commercial tools out there, but I have no experience with them and competent reviews (AFAICT) are far and few between.

Do any /.ers out there have any recommendations for FOSS or commercial Windows printer client management tools with end-user interfaces?

Required Features:
1. Display available printers (preferably from data stored in AD)
2. Automated install of user requested printers and drivers (stored on a shared network resource)
3. Centralized management of printer/driver resources
4. Web or GUI-based for non-technical users


Nice to have features:
1. Remote client management of printer definitions
2. Remote batch installation/change/remove functions


Any suggestions, recommendations or information would be greatly appreciated!"
top

Justice Dept., FBI to review use of forensic evidence in thousands of cases

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "From The Washington Post Article:

The Justice Department and the FBI have launched a review of thousands of criminal cases to determine whether any defendants were wrongly convicted or deserve a new trial because of flawed forensic evidence, officials said Tuesday. The undertaking is the largest post-conviction review ever done by the FBI. It will include cases conducted by all FBI Laboratory hair and fiber examiners since at least 1985 and may reach earlier if records are available, people familiar with the process said. Such FBI examinations have taken place in federal and local cases across the country, often in violent crimes, such as rape, murder and robbery.

"

Link to Original Source
top

Spearheads and DNA Point to a Second Founding Society in North America

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "In a follow up to my earlier post, the New York Times reports that a team from the University of Oregon has published a paper (paywalled) detailing recent finds in caves near Paisley, Oregon that point to non-Clovis people living in the area at the same time that the Clovis People inhabited North America. From the New York Times article:
"Stone spearheads and human DNA found in Oregon caves, anthropologists say, have produced firmer evidence that these are the oldest directly dated remains of people in North America. They also show that at least two cultures with distinct technologies — not a single one, as had been supposed — shared the continent more than 13,000 years ago.""

Link to Original Source
top

Earliest Americans Arrived in Waves, DNA Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Nicholas Wade of the New York Times writes:

North and South America were first populated by three waves of migrants from Siberia rather than just a single migration, say researchers who have studied the whole genomes of Native Americans in South America and Canada.
Some scientists assert that the Americas were peopled in one large migration from Siberia that happened about 15,000 years ago, but the new genetic research shows that this central episode was followed by at least two smaller migrations from Siberia, one by people who became the ancestors of today’s Eskimos and Aleutians and another by people speaking Na-Dene, whose descendants are confined to North America

The study, published online (this is a paywalled site, sorry.) investigated geographic, linguistic and genetic diversity in native American populations."
Link to Original Source

top

Florida accused of concealing worst tuberculosis outbreak in 20 years

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The state of Florida has been struggling for months with what the Centers for Disease Control describe as the worst tuberculosis outbreak in the United States in twenty years.

Although a CDC report went out to state health officials in April encouraging them to take concerted action, the warning went largely unnoticed and nothing has been done. The public did not even learn of the outbreak until June, after a man with an active case of TB was spotted in a Jacksonville soup kitchen.

The Palm Beach Post has managed to obtain records on the outbreak and the CDC report, though only after weeks of repeated requests. These documents should have been freely available under Florida’s Sunshine Law."

Link to Original Source
top

Moody's Cuts Credit Ratings of 15 Big Banks

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Moody's Investor's Service says they're concerned about risks to the big (including the "too big to fail") banks. Predictably, the banks try to deflect the issue by claiming that Moody's is living in the past and all that risky stuff should be considered water under the bridge. So which is it? Are the banks still engaging in risky activities which could give us a repeat of 2008, or is Moody's just looking to shake down the banks?

Or is it both? Where was Moody's during the housing boom? Busy giving high ratings to instruments jam-packed with bad loans. It's kind of hard to trust these guy now, eh?"

Link to Original Source
top

Web Sites Shine Light on Petty Bribery Worldwide

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The cost of claiming a legitimate income tax refund in Hyderabad, India? 10,000 rupees.
The going rate to get a child who has already passed the entrance requirements into high school in Nairobi, Kenya? 20,000 shillings.
The expense of obtaining a driver’s license after having passed the test in Karachi, Pakistan? 3,000 rupees.
Such is the price of what Swati Ramanathan calls “retail corruption,” the sort of nickel-and-dime bribery, as opposed to large-scale graft, that infects everyday life in so many parts of the world.

Ms. Ramanathan and her husband, Ramesh, along with Sridar Iyengar, set out to change all that in August 2010 when they started ipaidabribe.com, a site that collects anonymous reports of bribes paid, bribes requested but not paid and requests that were expected but not forthcoming."

Link to Original Source
top

Scannable Condoms Allow Users to 'Check-In' During Safe Sex

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Want to take social media to the next level? Chances are you’ve probably never heard of “checking in” when you have sex, or more specifically when you and your partner are engaging in protected sex.

Now you can brag to the world you’ve just got laid by checking in to a new geo-location website with details of where, why, who you used a condom with, and how the “safe sex was”"

Link to Original Source
top

Marijuana Smoking Does Not Harm Lungs, Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "A large new government study has found that smoking marijuana on a regular basis, even over many years, does not impair lung function.

The study, abstract here (full JAMA article paywalled), concluded that "Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use was not associated with adverse effects on pulmonary function." By contrast, the researchers found that compared to nonsmokers, marijuana users performed slightly better on lung function tests, though the improvement was minuscule."

Link to Original Source
top

Plan to Widen Availability of Morning-After Pill I

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Wednesday overruled the Food and Drug Administration's decision that emergency contraceptives be sold freely over the counter, including to teenagers 16 years old and younger.

The pill, called Plan B One-Step, has been available without a prescription to women 17 and older, but those 16 and younger have needed a prescription — and still will because of Ms. Sebelius’s decision.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, wrote that all the studies and experts agreed that young women would benefit from having easy access to Plan B.

The agency’s scientists, she wrote, “determined that the product was safe and effective in adolescent females, that adolescent females understood the product was not for routine use, and that the product would not protect them against sexually transmitted disease.”

This is a cabinet officer in a *Democratic* administration, and a female one at that, doing such a blatantly anti-women, anti-choice, anti-good sense thing! Geez Louise!"

Link to Original Source
top

The Way Forward Moving From the Post-Bubble, Post-

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The title of the white paper is, admittedly, a mouthful: “The Way Forward: Moving From the Post-Bubble, Post-Bust Economy to Renewed Growth and Competitiveness.” It was commissioned by the New America Foundation, which hoped that it might “re-center the political debate to better reflect the country’s deep economic problems,” according to Sherle Schwenninger, the director of the foundation’s Economic Growth Program. Its authors are Daniel Alpert, a managing partner of Westwood Capital; Robert Hockett, a professor of financial law at Cornell and a consultant to the New York Federal Reserve; and Nouriel Roubini, who is, well, Nouriel Roubini, whose consistently bearish views have been consistently right. It is scheduled to be released on Wednesday."
Link to Original Source

Journals

NotSanguine has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>