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Comments

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Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists

NotSanguine Re:The sad part is... (138 comments)

Actually, as Americans we have many rights not enumerated in the constitution.

All of that being true, there is still no "right to know" when applied to "everything that everyone in the government knows". For example, there is no "right to know" that the ambassador from some certain country is a dick and the best way to deal with him is to scratch his back a lot before asking for anything. What do you learn from that, and what does it benefit you to know? On the other hand, the idea that he's a dick is really counterproductive to future negotiations but is good to know so those negotiations can be productive.

And that kind of information is some of the really secret stuff that we all had a "right to know" from the Wikileaks documents.

Point taken. However, as Americans, we do have a right to audit our government and the actions of its officials. Too much of what is being done in our names (and everything the US Government does is done in the name of US citizens) is hidden from us. Especially the power grabs by the government (including warrantless surveillance, secret courts and widespread curtailment of individual liberties), the gross incompetence of various public servants, and the lies and obfuscation used to cover them up.

As you pointed out, it probably isn't politic to reveal our foreign policy strategies and/or tactics for dealing with foreign governments. Despite that, on balance, I'm glad Snowden made these documents public, as they've clearly shown the disdain that our government has for its people and for the ideals and institutions that make us a nation.

40 minutes ago
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Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists

NotSanguine Re:More bad science (138 comments)

I do believe that we have repeated history (in this case, history being the McCartney era nonsense with communists) and I think that lines were crossed using the new 'communist' (aka terrorist) threat as an excuse in exactly the same way that it happened during the McCartney era.

Thanks! Now Band On The Run makes much more sense to me!

4 hours ago
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Snowden's Leaks Didn't Help Terrorists

NotSanguine Re:The sad part is... (138 comments)

"... right to know?"

You made that right up. There is no such thing as a right to know.

There is such a thing though, as the right to be free of illegal search and seizure. That's difference between Snowden and Manning. A big one.

Actually, as Americans we have many rights not enumerated in the constitution. That was one of the arguments against implementing the "Bill of Rights" at the dawn of our Republic. Many were concerned that if we enumerated specific rights, it would be assumed that those were all there were.

That is not the case. The US constitution limits the power of the Federal government. It does *not* restrict the rights of the citizens. In fact, the Ninth Amendment clearly spells that out:
The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people

4 hours ago
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Torvalds: No Opinion On Systemd

NotSanguine Just As Relevant (344 comments)

Associated Press -- September 17, 2014
In his latest interview, Linus Torvalds shocked the world with his pronouncement that "Cheerios are delicious! Wheaties taste like fucking crap!" When asked to comment, a spokesperson for General Mills stated "Linus is right. Except about the Wheaties." The AP will stay on top of this breaking news and continue to bring you the latest on CerealGate, as it happens.

yesterday
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine Re:So-to-speak legal (417 comments)

If you classify ISP's as common carriers, the FCC will create a department or a sub-department to manage them. This department will get a budget, and that budget will have a mandatory yearly increase (This is how the government WORKS for EVERYTHING). Once the basic job has been done, and the processes are in place - what will these people do? They will want to keep their jobs secure. This is how HUMANS function in organizational hierarchies. They will do this by creating new reasons for their existence, new things that need to be regulated, new systems that need to be put in place, new needs for more people to increase the fiefdom. This is how absolutely everything in government works. Every time a new regulation is written... or a law is passed - this is what happens. This is exactly why we have a bloated Federal Government that's increasingly intrusive. It's do-gooders and well intentioned folks who fail to understand how this shit actually gets implemented that are the problem. So create a straw man (Did I say that regulating ISP's was EVIL? I did not) - and call me names all you want. I'm telling you HOW this grand idea is actually going to WORK in something called THE REAL WORLD. Once you flip the switch and do this, you won't be able to go back... ever. You will have created a monster that will simply grow, and grow, and grow consuming as much wealth as it can. So next you'll accuse me of not wanting to regulate anything, and you'll tell me I am against clean air and water, and if that doesn't work, then I am a racist. So boring, and so predictable it all is.

Please. Learn a little history. ISPs have historically been classified as common carriers. "Telecom" based ISPs still are. No organizational or regulation changes are required. Cable companies were exempted from this for a variety (many of which I disagreed with) of reasons which are no longer relevant.

In any case, I didn't call you any names, nor did I try to impugn your character or make any judgements about you as a person. I did (and do) disagree with your assertion that re-classifying *all* (as opposed to just some, which is currently the case) ISPs as common carriers would, necessarily, create some huge, money-sucking bureaucracy.

As I've repeatedly suggested, instead of making broad pronouncements which have minimal semantic value, how about addressing the issues and make some constructive suggestions, rather than asserting that I said things I did not.

Have a nice day, friend. I hope you and all those you care about are healthy, happy and fulfilled in their lives. May good fortune travel with you all of your days.

yesterday
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine Re:So-to-speak legal (417 comments)

The problem is once you build the agency... that will regulate the ISP's... it's sole mission will quickly become one of continuing it's existence, and getting ever larger automatic budget increases every year. The way you do this is to create new "crisis's" that require more regulation, and more people to enforce the regulations.

You mean the FCC? No one is suggesting any new regulatory agencies, or even any new regulations. All anyone is asking for is that *all* ISPs (not just "telecom" companies -- a distinction which is less relevant every day) be re-classified as common carriers. Sigh.

This is exactly how we got into the mess we are in on the Federal level. Because after the cry "There ought to be a law" nobody ever thinks about what's going to happen five, ten, twenty years down the road.

Which new law is it, in this case, that you're saying there's an outcry to create? I am aware of no bills or proposed legislation in this regard. Perhaps I'm ignorant -- please educate me.

While you're at it, I suggest that before making your "unassailable" pronouncements about how evil it is to regulate ISPs as common carriers, you take a little time and learn about the history of the regulation of ISPs. I think you'll find that your dire predictions didn't happen in the past, and reclassification of *all* ISPs as common carriers is both appropriate and beneficial to the Internet and its users.

If you're unwilling to understand how things actually were and are, and instead make knee-jerk judgements about the appropriateness of *anything*, you'll often come to faulty conclusions.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Advice On Building a Firewall With VPN Capabilities?

NotSanguine Re:Why VPN? (238 comments)

> I agree. I've been running a similar set up on a PIII-100 (remember those?) with 96MB RAM and a 200MB disk for almost twenty years.

--Dude, how high is your electric bill? o_O

--If you hook up a kill-a-watt to that beast, you might want to consider replacing that ancient machine with something like a Raspberry Pi / Cubietruck / Atom box - it will likely pay for itself within a year due to the power savings...

TS-836A Plug Power Meter = ~$16 on Amazon

Just to clarify, it's actually a Pentium Pro-200, not a PIII-100.

My electric bill is between me and the electric company. Thanks for your concern, though.

That said, I appreciate the suggestion, but my bill is already bit lower since I got rid of the Dell PowerEdge 6400 I was running for many years. What is more, when it's hot in the summer, my AC unit uses more power than all the other electric devices in my house. If I was really concerned, I'd sweat more. :)

Compared to the AC and the other systems I run, my firewall's power usage is negligible. I guess it's just a matter of perspective, eh?

2 days ago
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Say Goodbye To That Unwanted U2 Album

NotSanguine Re:Mommy's Poor Little Babies! (318 comments)

Although it's more like someone broke into your house and left you a gift you don't need.

While a nice thought the person shouldn't have broken into my house. They should've asked first.

Actually, it's more like you gave them the keys and said, "Come on in anytime you like, boys!" when enabling the auto-download feature. Whether or not they should have done it differently is a useful question, but (as you correctly pointed out) you have to enable auto-download manually. If someone did so and didn't realize that they were giving Apple carte blanche to rummage around in their device, that's thier mistake, not Apple's.

I'm not an Apple fan. I don't own any of their hardware, nor am I interested in purchasing any. I'm not even defending Apple's distribution choice in this case.

It just seems ridiculous to me that people are getting all mad at Apple about something that was in their control (again, as you and others have pointed out) all along.

Complaining about someone trying to do something nice for you (whether you want them too or not -- I guess you've never gotten a gift you didn't like -- as for not asking for it, the best gifts I've ever received were from people who just wanted to do something nice for me). It smacks of childish behavior, IMHO.

2 days ago
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Say Goodbye To That Unwanted U2 Album

NotSanguine Re:U2 poured 5 years of their soul into this album (318 comments)

Modded insightful because you think making music isn't real work? Idiots, all of them. I wonder what you consider real work?

Complaining about ridiculous bullshit on /. That's real work!

2 days ago
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Say Goodbye To That Unwanted U2 Album

NotSanguine Mommy's Poor Little Babies! (318 comments)

This is just awful! Someone gave you a gift. It's unconscionable! How dare anybody give you a gift! Especially one that you don't like. And you can't even re-gift it. Apple is the worst company in the world!

If you don't like the music, don't listen to it. If you don't like that Apple can push content to your device, don't use Apple devices

I guess that on your birthday, when a relative gives you a gift you don't like, you yell at them and demand that they take it back because it's beneath you, huh?

Are you all a bunch of six year olds? EWWW! Bono has cooties! His music is touching my music! WAAAAHHHH! Please.

And if you're complaining (somehow) about Apple violating the sanctity of your music collection, then don't use iTunes.

Sigh.

2 days ago
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Schizophrenia Is Not a Single Disease

NotSanguine Re:DNA? (215 comments)

Let's be honest there is quite a bit of difference on a planet with 7 billion people to enact laws making procreation and child rearing a privilege and responsibility only for those appropriate to do so versus you can spit out all the ones you want expecting the rest of society to care for them and take responsibility for them, this versus extermination camps.

Suck it up, despite all the whining about how badly it was done in the past it will not ever stop all of us or future generations from biting the bullet, it is a matter of inevitability or total collapse from the 20 billion idiocracy taking over and an extinct species replacing them.

A whole lot of problems can be safely easily eliminated in a generation or three or we can continue to fail future generations with them.

Absolutely. Let's start with you. Seems reasonable to me. Do I hear a second?

2 days ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine Re:why? Better for Comcast to not know (417 comments)

This raises the question of why Comcast would care. For many years at least, the conventional wisdom among service providers and other carriers was that they'd prefer to NOT know what a customer uses the service for. If the ISP doesn't, and can't, know which sites customers are visiting, they can't be held responsible either legally or in regards to PR. I was shopping for a colo facility for the backup service I offer and the contract for one facility said "no porn". That was a definite deal-breaker for me - I most definitely do not want to look at what my customers are having backed up, and therefore become responsible for it. It would be a huge waste of my time to deal with any copyright violations, verify age reqirements, etc so the business is better off not know what the bits are. Just store the bits (or transfer them, in Comcast's case). That would save Comcast a bunch of money compared to monitoring and therefore needing to moderate the content.

My take is (regardless of the veracity of TFA) that Comcast has a vested interest in addressing "copyright violations" as their parent company owns a large stock of "intellectual property." If they can't tell whether or not you're "stealing" their IP because you're using TOR, they see that as taking food out of their mouths. Just sayin'.

3 days ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine You Keep Using That Word (417 comments)

TROLL.

I do not think it means what you think it means.

3 days ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine Re:So-to-speak legal (417 comments)

Broadband Internet service needs to become a public non-profit utility, charged at a maximum of $39.95 a month for 50MB Upload and download speeds with NO data caps. And no disconnection unless you are CONVICTED of doing something illegal with/over your internet service.

I disagree. The last mile connections should be a public/quasi-public non-profit utility, with ISPs paying fees to the utility to connect to the last mile. They can then compete with each other on price and features (including speed).

3 days ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine Re:So-to-speak legal (417 comments)

I'll cut right to the chase. You allow the government to take over the ISP business, it will be regulated like in China. I'm very serious about that statement. Give it another 10 years-ish to boil that frog, but yes, that severe.

Please give me just one credible example where someone (anyone) is advocating that the "government take over the ISP business" in the US. It doesn't even have to be long and involved.

I'm not talking about the pervasive monitoring by the NSA, DOD and other government agencies. That's a different issue. A very important one that deserves our attention and needs to be fought vigoriously. But that shouldn't be diluted with some paranoid fantasy about the US government trying to nationalize ISPs.

Please. Just one real example. Thought so.

3 days ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine Re:So-to-speak legal (417 comments)

So how much is Comcast paying you to say that? Internet service being classified as a common carrier can only be a good thing for customers but Comcast and their kind will do anything to fight that.

[Emphasis Added]

That's absurd on its face. "Anything" is a really broad term. "Comcast and their kind will murder babies in their cribs to fight Common Carrier status." "Comcast and their kind will enslave the residents of Teaneck, NJ to fight Common Carrier status." "Comcast and their kind will come to your house and force you to watch as they rape your daughters to fight Common Carrier status."

Why not use a bit less hyperbole and a little more constructive argument? How about, "Comcast is using its virtual monopoly status and huge resources to influence politicians, spread FUD and muddy the waters to fight common carrier status." That would be much more useful and might even suggest courses of action. Wasn't that easy?

This is what I thought of when reading your post:

I cannot overemphasize the importance of good grammar.

What a crock. I could easily overemphasize the importance of good
grammar. For example, I could say: "Bad grammar is the leading cause
of slow, painful death in North America," or "Without good grammar, the
United States would have lost World War II."

-- Dave Barry,

3 days ago
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Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

NotSanguine Re:So-to-speak legal (417 comments)

Anyone with any awareness of history AT ALL should not want a government controlled internet. If you want the Federal government to do anything maybe it should forcing ISPs like Comcast who have infrastructure that depends on granted monopoly rights easements and the like be operated as common carriers but you definitely don't want them any more involved than that!

[Emphasis Added]

That's regulation. So, it's not regulation you're against, it's the Federal government encroaching on your civil liberties. Not all regulation is bad, and common carrier status for all ISPs would be (it was at one time, and hopefully will again) a good regulation. I'd also point out that reclassifying ISPs (regardless of the type of infrastructure, e.g., cable vs. telecom) as common carriers is about the farthest the FCC *could* go. No one is asking them to do anything more than that.

I'm mad about government surveillance and attempts to throttle free speech and personal liberties too. But knee-jerk reactions aren't helpful at all. Sadly, we likely won't get common carrier status for all ISPs. What's worse is that the state/local/municipal politician sale will continue, with entrenched players having their lap dog politicians keep them safe from competition.

If a free and vibrant Internet is important to you, start with your local government. You and your neighbors have a much better chance to effect change there than at the Federal level

3 days ago
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Oculus Rift CEO Says Classrooms of the Future Will Be In VR Goggles

NotSanguine Re:Transformative Platforms! (182 comments)

Television, in addition to carrying on the benefit of radio, shows students the world rather than simply referring to points on a map. Different cultures and environments can be described in full color with fluid video, rather than hoping the student understands a short text description that too often seems absurd due to its foreign context.

Really?

Yes, really. There's much more, but you can find that for yourself. No, it doesn't replace classroom learning, but it can be an excellent adjunct to it.

3 days ago
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Oculus Rift CEO Says Classrooms of the Future Will Be In VR Goggles

NotSanguine An Unbiased Opinion, Eh? (182 comments)

In other news, a spokesman for gun maker Smith & Wesson said today that "gun ranges are the classrooms of the future." Film at eleven.

3 days ago
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Navy Guilty of Illegally Broad Online Searches: Child Porn Conviction Overturned

NotSanguine Re:Problem? (286 comments)

If this saved the life and virtue of even one child, then I have a hard time feeling like they did anything wrong.

Okay. So let's have all your passwords and full access to your home, office and other property to make sure you're not breaking any laws. What? You have nothing to hide? Good. So we can install audio and video monitoring devices in your car and your house, including the bedroom, bathroom, providing full 24/7 coverage. Nothing to worry about citizen, this is for your protection.

3 days ago

Submissions

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New dates rewrite Neanderthal story

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a month ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The BBC reports on research detailing the decline of Neanderthals in Europe. The international research team tested samples from over 400 Neanderthal sites, resulting in a new timeline for the decline and extinction of Homo Neanderthalensis, hinting at a much longer period of coexistence with modern humans. A summary of the research is available on the Nature web site.

From the BBC article:

The results provide the clearest insight yet into the interaction between our ancestors and Neanderthals, when they first encountered each other and why the Neanderthals went extinct, according to the lead researcher, Prof Thomas Higham of the University of Oxford. "I think we can set aside the idea of a rapid extinction of Neanderthals caused solely by the arrival of modern humans. Instead we can see a more complex process in which there is a much longer overlap between the two populations where there could have been exchanges of ideas and culture."

"

Link to Original Source
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Compromise struck on cellphone unlocking bill

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 months ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The US Senate has passed a bill (S.517) today allowing users to unlock their phones when moving to another provider.

From a recent article at thehill.com:

“Consumers should be able to use their existing cell phones when they move their service to a new wireless provider,” Leahy said in a statement. “Our laws should not prohibit consumers from carrying their cell phones to a new network, and we should promote and protect competition in the wireless marketplace,” he said. Grassley called the bipartisan compromise “an important step forward in ensuring that there is competition in the industry and in safeguarding options for consumers as they look at new cell phone contracts.” “Empowering people with the freedom to use the carrier of their choice after complying with their original terms of service is the right thing to do,” he said. The House in February passed a companion bill sponsored on cellphone unlocking from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.).

"

Link to Original Source
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Forensic Genetics And The Law

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 10 months ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "C-SPAN Covered the 2013 10th Circuit Bench And Bar Conference in Colorado Springs, CO. While this isn't new (from August, 2013), the topics and issues covered were both interesting and pertinent to many discussions about how DNA technology can be used in legal contexts.

From the site description:

Panelists talked about genetics, forensics, and their use in the criminal justice system and society.They discussed the DNA evidence routinely used in criminal cases as well as in investigations of mass graves, missing persons, and for identification.After the break, Nita Farahany talked about how behavior sciences impact the legal system, and Hank Greely talked about whole genome sequencing, the implications of pre-natal genetic testing, and the privacy and ethical issues raised when everyone’s genomes are known and stored.Speakers used PowerPoint during their presentations.Images included skeletons, mass graves, and DNA sources.Panelists responded to questions from members of the audience after their individual presentations and as a group.

"

Link to Original Source
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Network Solutions Outage?

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Network Solutions, Inc. DNS servers are not responding to name resolution requests. The corporate website (http://www.networksolutions.com) appears to be down as well.

Has anyone else seen these issues, or have any information as to what may be going on?"
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Some of My Best Friends Are Germs

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Michael Pollan of the New York Times writes:

I can tell you the exact date that I began to think of myself in the first-person plural — as a superorganism, that is, rather than a plain old individual human being. It happened on March 7. That’s when I opened my e-mail to find a huge, processor-choking file of charts and raw data from a laboratory located at the BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As part of a new citizen-science initiative called the American Gut project, the lab sequenced my microbiome — that is, the genes not of “me,” exactly, but of the several hundred microbial species with whom I share this body. These bacteria, which number around 100 trillion, are living (and dying) right now on the surface of my skin, on my tongue and deep in the coils of my intestines, where the largest contingent of them will be found, a pound or two of microbes together forming a vast, largely uncharted interior wilderness that scientists are just beginning to map.
...
Justin Sonnenburg, a microbiologist at Stanford, suggests that we would do well to begin regarding the human body as “an elaborate vessel optimized for the growth and spread of our microbial inhabitants.”

I, for one, welcome our (not so) new bacterial overlords."
Link to Original Source

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A Trail of Clicks, Culminating in Conflict

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Technology companies are up in arms about the FTC's pending rules change which would require explicit parental permission allowing websites to gather a wide range of data on children 13 and under.

From the NYT Article:


“If adopted, the effect of these new rules would be to slow the deployment of applications that provide tremendous benefits to children, and to slow the economic growth and job creation generated by the app economy,” Catherine A. Novelli, vice president of worldwide government affairs at Apple, wrote in comments to the agency.

But would that be a bad thing? As reported in the New York Times last week, Matt Richtel of the NYT writes:

There is a widespread belief among teachers that students’ constant use of digital technology is hampering their attention spans and ability to persevere in the face of challenging tasks, according to two surveys of teachers being released on Thursday.

So, will the new FTC rules end up helping children (by enhancing their privacy and, if industry pundits are right, reducing the amount of content available online for children — thus enhancing their attention spans), or will the negative effects on corporations have as deleterious an effect on the economy as to measurably reduce the quality of education?"
Link to Original Source

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Official Stirs Texas City With Talk of Rebellion

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Manny Fernandez of the NY Times writes:

LUBBOCK, Tex. — A hearing on a proposed tax increase had just started at the county courthouse here Monday when Grace Rogers, a retired teacher, addressed local leaders. Ms. Rogers said she supported the idea of increasing the property tax to 34.6 cents per $100 valuation from 32.9 cents to finance the hiring of additional sheriff’s deputies — with one reservation. It was that, she said, “it does not fund a paramilitary to create an insurrection and rebellion against the United States.”

County Judge Tom Head is calling for the tax increase as he is concerned (or so he told Texas broadcaster Fox34) that If President Obama is re-elected, we should expect cvil unrest and that the president would send in United Nations troops to pacify the populace. Monies from the tax increase would be used to pay for “...trained, equipped, seasoned veteran officers..." to fend off the blue helmeted invaders."
Link to Original Source

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Ask Slashdot: Quality FOSS/Commercial Enterprise Printer Client Management

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "We are nearing completion of Windows 7 (x64) images for our VDI and physical devices. Our Windows XP images included an in-house developed printer installation tool accessible to end-users.

This tool (written in VB6) will not run without installing a whole bunch of ancient libraries. As such, we'd like to obtain a new tool.
Management does not want to expend resources on scripting a new tool or updating the old one.

The environment consists of Windows systems in an Active Directory environment without print servers.
All printer assignments would be direct IP connections to the (mostly) HP printers.

I know there are a number of commercial tools out there, but I have no experience with them and competent reviews (AFAICT) are far and few between.

Do any /.ers out there have any recommendations for FOSS or commercial Windows printer client management tools with end-user interfaces?

Required Features:
1. Display available printers (preferably from data stored in AD)
2. Automated install of user requested printers and drivers (stored on a shared network resource)
3. Centralized management of printer/driver resources
4. Web or GUI-based for non-technical users


Nice to have features:
1. Remote client management of printer definitions
2. Remote batch installation/change/remove functions


Any suggestions, recommendations or information would be greatly appreciated!"
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Justice Dept., FBI to review use of forensic evidence in thousands of cases

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "From The Washington Post Article:

The Justice Department and the FBI have launched a review of thousands of criminal cases to determine whether any defendants were wrongly convicted or deserve a new trial because of flawed forensic evidence, officials said Tuesday. The undertaking is the largest post-conviction review ever done by the FBI. It will include cases conducted by all FBI Laboratory hair and fiber examiners since at least 1985 and may reach earlier if records are available, people familiar with the process said. Such FBI examinations have taken place in federal and local cases across the country, often in violent crimes, such as rape, murder and robbery.

"

Link to Original Source
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Spearheads and DNA Point to a Second Founding Society in North America

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "In a follow up to my earlier post, the New York Times reports that a team from the University of Oregon has published a paper (paywalled) detailing recent finds in caves near Paisley, Oregon that point to non-Clovis people living in the area at the same time that the Clovis People inhabited North America. From the New York Times article:
"Stone spearheads and human DNA found in Oregon caves, anthropologists say, have produced firmer evidence that these are the oldest directly dated remains of people in North America. They also show that at least two cultures with distinct technologies — not a single one, as had been supposed — shared the continent more than 13,000 years ago.""

Link to Original Source
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Earliest Americans Arrived in Waves, DNA Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Nicholas Wade of the New York Times writes:

North and South America were first populated by three waves of migrants from Siberia rather than just a single migration, say researchers who have studied the whole genomes of Native Americans in South America and Canada.
Some scientists assert that the Americas were peopled in one large migration from Siberia that happened about 15,000 years ago, but the new genetic research shows that this central episode was followed by at least two smaller migrations from Siberia, one by people who became the ancestors of today’s Eskimos and Aleutians and another by people speaking Na-Dene, whose descendants are confined to North America

The study, published online (this is a paywalled site, sorry.) investigated geographic, linguistic and genetic diversity in native American populations."
Link to Original Source

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Florida accused of concealing worst tuberculosis outbreak in 20 years

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The state of Florida has been struggling for months with what the Centers for Disease Control describe as the worst tuberculosis outbreak in the United States in twenty years.

Although a CDC report went out to state health officials in April encouraging them to take concerted action, the warning went largely unnoticed and nothing has been done. The public did not even learn of the outbreak until June, after a man with an active case of TB was spotted in a Jacksonville soup kitchen.

The Palm Beach Post has managed to obtain records on the outbreak and the CDC report, though only after weeks of repeated requests. These documents should have been freely available under Florida’s Sunshine Law."

Link to Original Source
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Moody's Cuts Credit Ratings of 15 Big Banks

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Moody's Investor's Service says they're concerned about risks to the big (including the "too big to fail") banks. Predictably, the banks try to deflect the issue by claiming that Moody's is living in the past and all that risky stuff should be considered water under the bridge. So which is it? Are the banks still engaging in risky activities which could give us a repeat of 2008, or is Moody's just looking to shake down the banks?

Or is it both? Where was Moody's during the housing boom? Busy giving high ratings to instruments jam-packed with bad loans. It's kind of hard to trust these guy now, eh?"

Link to Original Source
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Web Sites Shine Light on Petty Bribery Worldwide

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The cost of claiming a legitimate income tax refund in Hyderabad, India? 10,000 rupees.
The going rate to get a child who has already passed the entrance requirements into high school in Nairobi, Kenya? 20,000 shillings.
The expense of obtaining a driver’s license after having passed the test in Karachi, Pakistan? 3,000 rupees.
Such is the price of what Swati Ramanathan calls “retail corruption,” the sort of nickel-and-dime bribery, as opposed to large-scale graft, that infects everyday life in so many parts of the world.

Ms. Ramanathan and her husband, Ramesh, along with Sridar Iyengar, set out to change all that in August 2010 when they started ipaidabribe.com, a site that collects anonymous reports of bribes paid, bribes requested but not paid and requests that were expected but not forthcoming."

Link to Original Source
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Scannable Condoms Allow Users to 'Check-In' During Safe Sex

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Want to take social media to the next level? Chances are you’ve probably never heard of “checking in” when you have sex, or more specifically when you and your partner are engaging in protected sex.

Now you can brag to the world you’ve just got laid by checking in to a new geo-location website with details of where, why, who you used a condom with, and how the “safe sex was”"

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Marijuana Smoking Does Not Harm Lungs, Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "A large new government study has found that smoking marijuana on a regular basis, even over many years, does not impair lung function.

The study, abstract here (full JAMA article paywalled), concluded that "Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use was not associated with adverse effects on pulmonary function." By contrast, the researchers found that compared to nonsmokers, marijuana users performed slightly better on lung function tests, though the improvement was minuscule."

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Plan to Widen Availability of Morning-After Pill I

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Wednesday overruled the Food and Drug Administration's decision that emergency contraceptives be sold freely over the counter, including to teenagers 16 years old and younger.

The pill, called Plan B One-Step, has been available without a prescription to women 17 and older, but those 16 and younger have needed a prescription — and still will because of Ms. Sebelius’s decision.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, wrote that all the studies and experts agreed that young women would benefit from having easy access to Plan B.

The agency’s scientists, she wrote, “determined that the product was safe and effective in adolescent females, that adolescent females understood the product was not for routine use, and that the product would not protect them against sexually transmitted disease.”

This is a cabinet officer in a *Democratic* administration, and a female one at that, doing such a blatantly anti-women, anti-choice, anti-good sense thing! Geez Louise!"

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The Way Forward Moving From the Post-Bubble, Post-

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The title of the white paper is, admittedly, a mouthful: “The Way Forward: Moving From the Post-Bubble, Post-Bust Economy to Renewed Growth and Competitiveness.” It was commissioned by the New America Foundation, which hoped that it might “re-center the political debate to better reflect the country’s deep economic problems,” according to Sherle Schwenninger, the director of the foundation’s Economic Growth Program. Its authors are Daniel Alpert, a managing partner of Westwood Capital; Robert Hockett, a professor of financial law at Cornell and a consultant to the New York Federal Reserve; and Nouriel Roubini, who is, well, Nouriel Roubini, whose consistently bearish views have been consistently right. It is scheduled to be released on Wednesday."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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I Made A Foe Today

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about two weeks ago

I'm not really sure why. I don't recall ever interacting with that user before. I guess they don't like the things I have to say.

It seems to me that a better way to handle that would be engage me in conversation so we can both explore our views.

At the same time, if that's the way this person feels, I can handle it. If it was me, I'd just ignore them. But if someone wants to expend their energy hating, who am I to say they shouldn't?

I took the easy way out, I guess. I friended the user who made me a foe. I expect that may annoy them, but that's not my problem.

It does feel a little strange, though. After years on /., no one else has done that. Perhaps I'm gaining an (anti)following? Who knows?

It also prompted me to write my first journal entry. I'm not too happy about its content but I really just wanted to talk about this momentous occasion.

I'VE FINALLY MADE THE BIG TIME!!! WOO-HOO!

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