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Comments

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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

NotSanguine Re:Strawman argument (715 comments)

Then I'm sure you won't mind when I call you an idiot, because the question is obviously if being abusive is morally correct and helpful. No one's saying you *can't* act like a jerk, they're saying you shouldn't, especially when holding a respected position.

Please. Speak your mind. If you don't like what I say, say something about it.

I would point out that context is an important part of any communication. I emphatically did not say that I think being verbally obnoxious, abusive, or as you put it, act like a jerk was a good idea, nor did I advocate it.

My point, since you obviously didn't get it the first time, was that if you limit one person's expression (whether that be via law, custom, culture or social pressure), you diminish us all, and set a dangerous precedent.

What is more, your morality is not my morality. Nor is it anyone else's. Morality is our behavior based on the moral choices each of us makes when confronted with a moral choice. That is not a group activity. Each individual must make their own moral choices and be willing to accept responsibility for the actions they take based on their individual moral choices.

I specifically noted that it is an open question as to whether Linus Torvalds' speech is helpful or not. But it's not my place (nor is it yours or the GP's) to attempt to restrict Mr. Torvalds' freedom of expression. If you don't like what he says, say so. Even better, explain why you don't like it. Perhaps you'll convince him.

2 days ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

NotSanguine Re:Strawman argument (715 comments)

Ah, the old may/may not can/can not confusion.

In case you didn't notice, you didn't reply to what the GP said. You replied to a twisted version of it. A straw man version of it, one might even say.

What is more, I replied to SuperBanana's assertion that:

I specifically said: it's fine to tell people they did something wrong. What you may not do is be abusive.

Where exactly did I twist things in my response? How is my response a straw man? Perhaps I'm just a bit slow, but I don't get it.

N.B. This is more rope for you. Please, by all means, take it.

2 days ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

NotSanguine Re:Strawman argument (715 comments)

Ah, the old may/may not can/can not confusion.

In case you didn't notice, you didn't reply to what the GP said. You replied to a twisted version of it. A straw man version of it, one might even say.

Your complaint about my word choice is wrong too. Strawman indeed.

Please carry on and don't take anything I wrote here as an admonition to cease expressing yourself. I would recommend that you give a little more thought to the things you say, folks might take you a bit more seriously if you did.

Justice Brandeis was and is correct that "... the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence."

2 days ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

NotSanguine Re:Actually, I can be abusive if I choose to be. (715 comments)

No you can't, because the existence of abuse is dependant on the perceptions of person who believes they have been abused. It is not possible to abuse a rational person, you are simply correct or incorrect in your claims and they way you package the data is just a question of efficiency.

So has Linus made and incorrect claim and or done so inefficiently? I'd say no, the message was accurate, clear and memorable.

If people feel that Linus is being abusive they are in the wrong industry, or they can go and write their own OS, cuddlinix.

An excellent point, which fits nicely with the claim that the remedy is more speech, not censorship. And "Political Correctness" is a framework for cultural censorship.

That's not to say that I think courtesy and politeness are passe. Quite the contrary, in fact. However, Linus has continued to speak plainly, does not suffer fools gladly, and generally embeds (at least IME) his sharp (and often salty) comments in a matrix of humor and good sense.

2 days ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

NotSanguine Re:Strawman argument (715 comments)

Actually, I can be abusive if I choose to be.

No you cannot. We have extensive laws against it.

How's this? Fuck you. You gonna arrest me now?

2 days ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

NotSanguine Re:Strawman argument (715 comments)

Strawman argument. Nobody except you has posited that "all opinions are valid", and nobody suggested that criticisms can't be made. You invented that position to attack it.

I specifically said: it's fine to tell people they did something wrong. What you may not do is be abusive.

Actually, I can be abusive if I choose to be. It may not win me many friends and it may alienate the ones I do have, but I can certainly do so if I want.

Whether or not Linus advances Linux because of, or in spite of, being abusive is an open question.

As Louis Brandeis (and correctly, IMHO) pointed out, "If there be time to expose through discussion the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the process of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence."

3 days ago
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Precisely what makes a comment valuable to the FCC?

NotSanguine Mod This Funny...Or Sad (2 comments)

The FCC works for the American people, if we want something, that should be sufficient reason to rule in our favor."

I assume that was an attempt at humor? Either that or you need to stop smoking that stuff before posting. The FCC hasn't worked for the American people in at least a decade.

about a week ago
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Finding Life In Space By Looking For Extraterrestrial Pollution

NotSanguine Re:Major disappointment... (95 comments)

After all these years of running SETI@Home, we still haven't found any extraterrestial TV signals carrying alien porn. :/

It was on the tee-vee, friend. :)

about a week ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

NotSanguine Re:No More Limited Upload Globally (234 comments)

Note that I most certainly did not say that those who disagree with me are probably brain-dead. I said that if the examples I gave weren't enough to elucidate my point that:

You were trying to drive into me your point that I hadn't said anything to the contrary about. Yes, calling people "brain-dead" because they don't accept your point is insulting and non-productive.

Actually, I wasn't responding to you in particular. Your post prompted me to express my thoughts about symmetrical bandwidth in general, and was not meant as a jab at you. Sigh.

Are you feeling a bit stressed today?

You cannot drop the insulting attitude even after it is pointed out to you and you pretend that you didn't mean it in the first place.

Actually, I can proceed as I choose. As can you (not pretending to give you permission, just pointing out what is). If you choose to interpret my statements in a way I didn't intend, that's your privilege. Language is inexact and without other, non-language cues as to my, as you put it, "attitude" I can see why you might interpret my writing that way. I suspect that your idea that I have some axe to grind with you (which I assure you, I don't) is based on the fact we disagree.

Your assessment of my state of mind is of no concern to me. Feel free to interpret me (or not) as you like. It doesn't irk me that you think I'm being disingenuous, although it does raise the idea that perhaps I should be more explicit in the future. In any case, please do carry on. Once again, have a nice day!

about a week ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

NotSanguine Re:No More Limited Upload Globally (234 comments)

I could go on, but if you don't get the idea by now, you're probably brain-dead.

I get the idea that you become insulting when someone doesn't value symmetric data service as much as you do. Was there another point, because if there was your insulting tone did a good job of masking it.

Note that I most certainly did not say that those who disagree with me are probably brain-dead. I said that if the examples I gave weren't enough to elucidate my point that:

It seems to me that providing symmetric high-speed connections is critical to the future of free speech, innovation, creative output and communications the world over.

I don't count disagreeing with me as not getting the idea. Given your response, you clearly did "get the idea" even though you disagree.

It seems you took offense at something not meant for you. Are you feeling a bit stressed today? Perhaps a cold drink, a massage, and some soothing music will calm you. Or not. It's not my concern. Nor is the fact that you disagree with me. I'm okay with that too.

I asserted that symmetric bandwidth was important to our society in a variety of ways, and gave several (IMHO clear and concise) examples as to why I believe that. Take from that what you will. Or not. Either way, have a nice day!

about two weeks ago
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Activist Group Sues US Border Agency Over New, Vast Intelligence System

NotSanguine Re:No Decent Solution (82 comments)

In 2013 almost a million people immigrated to the US legally.

I know. Recognizing sarcasm isn't your strong suit, eh?

about two weeks ago
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Activist Group Sues US Border Agency Over New, Vast Intelligence System

NotSanguine Re:No Decent Solution (82 comments)

A strong nation ID card would help such that even casual employment was not possible without prior approval by local police would go a long way towards stopping illegals from having the desire to get here. Yet businesses love lowering the wage pool by flooding illegal immigrants into the nation. I wonder just how much the price of groceries would jump if illegal farm labor was shut down. And the absolute bottom line is that reproduction as well as immigration degrades the quality of life for all of us. We need strict population size control.

You're absolutely right. Those people don't deserve to live here, thinking they can come to this country and have their descendants live here too! And all those wetback children using our diapers are a disgrace! We Americans have been here since the beginning of the American continent, formed as the super-continent Pangaea broke up starting about 175 million years ago. Immigrants must be stopped. They never gave us anything but trouble. But why stop with just keeping out the immigrants and limiting procreation (that's worked out really well in China, no?)? Let's get Swiftian on their asses! MMMM babies!

about two weeks ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

NotSanguine Re:No More Limited Upload Globally (234 comments)

"Fair" is a very subjective word. Who says it is fair to have everyone paying for service that they wont' use? Most people don't need the same upstream speed as they need down. Not even those who are using Netflix or downloading large Linux distributions need the same up as down. Only those sending out large amounts of data will see any difference, and that's only if the transmission is monitored in real-time and not just a background task.

As someone else pointed out, this change will make very little difference in the load imbalance at the peering points since most people aren't hitting an upload limit to start with.

It seems to me that providing symmetric high-speed connections is critical to the future of free speech, innovation, creative output and communications the world over.

When I can serve up my documentary on government malfeasance and allow dozens, if not hundreds of other people to pull my content easily -- and those folks can then host it for tens or hundreds of thousands more people, it becomes much harder for the "big lie" to succeed.

When I can host my own "social network" that links to those people I give a crap about, and there's no corporate slime drooling all over my personal data because I own *and* host it (think Diaspora) and my friends and connections host their own servers that I can connect or not connect with -- at my discretion, some semblance of privacy is recovered.

When I can write my own software or music or literature and distribute it without the (economic) censorship of the corporate world stifling me or that same crowd sucking up most of the profits, innovation and creativity will blossom.

I could go on, but if you don't get the idea by now, you're probably brain-dead.

about two weeks ago
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States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth

NotSanguine Re:Of course employment went up (778 comments)

...The owner will have to decide between passing the overhead to the customer by raising rates (potentially losing customers due to the rate hike) or terminating a helper plus working longer hours to compensate. This type of hard choice happens all the time for small businesses anytime a major unexpected change occurs in the mechanics of the world that power that business. Computer repair shops weren't doing so hot a few years ago when Thailand flooded and new hard drive prices literally doubled overnight, for example; I wonder how many of them went out of business because of the spike.

What you're leaving out is that just as that employer is required to pay more, all the other employers are required to do so as well. This eliminates the crux of your main argument. No additional pressures are put on the business, since all other like businesses need to conform to the same standard. It's possible that prices might rise as a result, depending on the profit margins desired by the business owner.

What happens when more people have more income? Perhaps they'll be able to afford goods and services they were unable to afford in the past, or weren't able to purchase in the quantities desired/required without the wage increases.

Applying minimum wage hikes (perhaps $.50/hour each year in addition to increases to address inflation, until the minimum wage is, in fact, a living wage) would drive folks who don't save to spend more, driving consumer demand and pulling the economy along with it.

Feel free to disagree, but don't expect me to subscribe to your (IMHO) incorrect assessment of the situation.

about two weeks ago
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Dealing With 'Advertising Pollution'

NotSanguine Re:Ads are good for the internet. (394 comments)

And since the Internet as we know it has become, thanks to scum-sucking advertizers, a hive of scum and villainy,

Headquartered at Mos Eisley, I presume?

about two weeks ago
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US House Passes Permanent Ban On Internet Access Taxes

NotSanguine Re:So then no public funded internet? (148 comments)

I'd love to see the "last mile" connection maintained by public utilities, breaking all cable company monopolies everywhere,

I couldn't agree more.

about two weeks ago
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US House Passes Permanent Ban On Internet Access Taxes

NotSanguine Re:So then no public funded internet? (148 comments)

If a city or state wanted to have a public utility type state owned ISP instead of the current craze of profit/rent seeking privately owned ISP, this would incentivize the status quo.

There. FTFY.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Unattended Maintenance Windows?

NotSanguine Re:Murphy says no. (265 comments)

In general, don't do anything that isn't your core business. Or another way of saying it, Do What Only You Can Do.

If you are an insurance company, is building and maintaining hardware your business? No, not in the slightest. You have no more business maintaining computer hardware as you have maintaining printing presses to print your own claims forms.

Maintaining hardware and the rest of the infrastructure stack however, is the business of Amazon AWS, Windows Azure, etc. The "fantasy" you're referring to is the crazy idea that you, as some kind of God SysAdmin, can out-perform the world's top infrastructure providers at maintaining infrastructure. Even if you were the best SysAdmin alive on the planet, you can't scale very far.

Sure, any of those providers can (and do, frequently) fail. Still, they are better than you can ever hope to be, especially once you scale past a handful of servers. If you are concerned that they still fail, that's good, yet it's still a problem worst addressed by taking the hardware in house. A much better solution is to build your deployments to be cloud vendor agnostic: Be able to run on AWS or Azure (or both, and maybe a few other friends too) either all the time by default or at the flip of a (frequently tested) switch.

Even building in multi-cloud redundancy is far easier, cheaper, and more reliable than you could ever hope to build from scratch on your own. That's just the reality of modern computing.

There are reasons to build on premises still, but they are few and far between. Especially now that cloud providers are becoming PCI, SOX, and even HIPAA capable and certified.

Yes. AWS, Azure, etc. are focused on (and are actually pretty good at) providing compute services (whether that be PaaS or straight-up VMs). However, what they are not is contractually responsible for the safekeeping or integrity of your data.

There are definitely use cases for using "someone else's servers." Use them for external-facing resources like a web presence, customer portal, extranet services or even email. But when it comes to business critical systems and data, no one has a more compelling motive to secure and maintain them than an internal IT staff.

I imagine you'll disagree with me, which is fine. I would point out that despite the costs of implementing and maintaining a highly availabile internal virtualization environment, many of those costs are significantly offset by the usage and maintenance contracts as well as network connectivity required to support internal access to "someone else's servers."

In the end, it's a matter of balancing the costs against the criticality and confidentiality of the data, IMHO.

Assuming it would require me to provide personal information, remind me not to do business with whatever company you work for. Then again, if you're a shill for a "cloud" (marketing-speak for "someone else's servers), I understand. Either way, carry on.

about three weeks ago
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Arecibo Radio Telescope Confirms Extra-galactic Fast Radio Pulses

NotSanguine Re:First contact? (95 comments)

Please tell me the novel doesn't wreck the ending in some weird appeasement to religion like the movie did.

The novel was written by Carl Sagan, so religion isn't treated gently, and rightly so.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Compromise struck on cellphone unlocking bill

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  5 days ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The US Senate has passed a bill (S.517) today allowing users to unlock their phones when moving to another provider.

From a recent article at thehill.com:

“Consumers should be able to use their existing cell phones when they move their service to a new wireless provider,” Leahy said in a statement. “Our laws should not prohibit consumers from carrying their cell phones to a new network, and we should promote and protect competition in the wireless marketplace,” he said. Grassley called the bipartisan compromise “an important step forward in ensuring that there is competition in the industry and in safeguarding options for consumers as they look at new cell phone contracts.” “Empowering people with the freedom to use the carrier of their choice after complying with their original terms of service is the right thing to do,” he said. The House in February passed a companion bill sponsored on cellphone unlocking from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.).

"

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Forensic Genetics And The Law

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 8 months ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "C-SPAN Covered the 2013 10th Circuit Bench And Bar Conference in Colorado Springs, CO. While this isn't new (from August, 2013), the topics and issues covered were both interesting and pertinent to many discussions about how DNA technology can be used in legal contexts.

From the site description:

Panelists talked about genetics, forensics, and their use in the criminal justice system and society.They discussed the DNA evidence routinely used in criminal cases as well as in investigations of mass graves, missing persons, and for identification.After the break, Nita Farahany talked about how behavior sciences impact the legal system, and Hank Greely talked about whole genome sequencing, the implications of pre-natal genetic testing, and the privacy and ethical issues raised when everyone’s genomes are known and stored.Speakers used PowerPoint during their presentations.Images included skeletons, mass graves, and DNA sources.Panelists responded to questions from members of the audience after their individual presentations and as a group.

"

Link to Original Source
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Network Solutions Outage?

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  1 year,13 days

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Network Solutions, Inc. DNS servers are not responding to name resolution requests. The corporate website (http://www.networksolutions.com) appears to be down as well.

Has anyone else seen these issues, or have any information as to what may be going on?"
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Some of My Best Friends Are Germs

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Michael Pollan of the New York Times writes:

I can tell you the exact date that I began to think of myself in the first-person plural — as a superorganism, that is, rather than a plain old individual human being. It happened on March 7. That’s when I opened my e-mail to find a huge, processor-choking file of charts and raw data from a laboratory located at the BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado, Boulder. As part of a new citizen-science initiative called the American Gut project, the lab sequenced my microbiome — that is, the genes not of “me,” exactly, but of the several hundred microbial species with whom I share this body. These bacteria, which number around 100 trillion, are living (and dying) right now on the surface of my skin, on my tongue and deep in the coils of my intestines, where the largest contingent of them will be found, a pound or two of microbes together forming a vast, largely uncharted interior wilderness that scientists are just beginning to map.
...
Justin Sonnenburg, a microbiologist at Stanford, suggests that we would do well to begin regarding the human body as “an elaborate vessel optimized for the growth and spread of our microbial inhabitants.”

I, for one, welcome our (not so) new bacterial overlords."
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A Trail of Clicks, Culminating in Conflict

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about a year and a half ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Technology companies are up in arms about the FTC's pending rules change which would require explicit parental permission allowing websites to gather a wide range of data on children 13 and under.

From the NYT Article:


“If adopted, the effect of these new rules would be to slow the deployment of applications that provide tremendous benefits to children, and to slow the economic growth and job creation generated by the app economy,” Catherine A. Novelli, vice president of worldwide government affairs at Apple, wrote in comments to the agency.

But would that be a bad thing? As reported in the New York Times last week, Matt Richtel of the NYT writes:

There is a widespread belief among teachers that students’ constant use of digital technology is hampering their attention spans and ability to persevere in the face of challenging tasks, according to two surveys of teachers being released on Thursday.

So, will the new FTC rules end up helping children (by enhancing their privacy and, if industry pundits are right, reducing the amount of content available online for children — thus enhancing their attention spans), or will the negative effects on corporations have as deleterious an effect on the economy as to measurably reduce the quality of education?"
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Official Stirs Texas City With Talk of Rebellion

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Manny Fernandez of the NY Times writes:

LUBBOCK, Tex. — A hearing on a proposed tax increase had just started at the county courthouse here Monday when Grace Rogers, a retired teacher, addressed local leaders. Ms. Rogers said she supported the idea of increasing the property tax to 34.6 cents per $100 valuation from 32.9 cents to finance the hiring of additional sheriff’s deputies — with one reservation. It was that, she said, “it does not fund a paramilitary to create an insurrection and rebellion against the United States.”

County Judge Tom Head is calling for the tax increase as he is concerned (or so he told Texas broadcaster Fox34) that If President Obama is re-elected, we should expect cvil unrest and that the president would send in United Nations troops to pacify the populace. Monies from the tax increase would be used to pay for “...trained, equipped, seasoned veteran officers..." to fend off the blue helmeted invaders."
Link to Original Source

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Ask Slashdot: Quality FOSS/Commercial Enterprise Printer Client Management

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "We are nearing completion of Windows 7 (x64) images for our VDI and physical devices. Our Windows XP images included an in-house developed printer installation tool accessible to end-users.

This tool (written in VB6) will not run without installing a whole bunch of ancient libraries. As such, we'd like to obtain a new tool.
Management does not want to expend resources on scripting a new tool or updating the old one.

The environment consists of Windows systems in an Active Directory environment without print servers.
All printer assignments would be direct IP connections to the (mostly) HP printers.

I know there are a number of commercial tools out there, but I have no experience with them and competent reviews (AFAICT) are far and few between.

Do any /.ers out there have any recommendations for FOSS or commercial Windows printer client management tools with end-user interfaces?

Required Features:
1. Display available printers (preferably from data stored in AD)
2. Automated install of user requested printers and drivers (stored on a shared network resource)
3. Centralized management of printer/driver resources
4. Web or GUI-based for non-technical users


Nice to have features:
1. Remote client management of printer definitions
2. Remote batch installation/change/remove functions


Any suggestions, recommendations or information would be greatly appreciated!"
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Justice Dept., FBI to review use of forensic evidence in thousands of cases

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "From The Washington Post Article:

The Justice Department and the FBI have launched a review of thousands of criminal cases to determine whether any defendants were wrongly convicted or deserve a new trial because of flawed forensic evidence, officials said Tuesday. The undertaking is the largest post-conviction review ever done by the FBI. It will include cases conducted by all FBI Laboratory hair and fiber examiners since at least 1985 and may reach earlier if records are available, people familiar with the process said. Such FBI examinations have taken place in federal and local cases across the country, often in violent crimes, such as rape, murder and robbery.

"

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Spearheads and DNA Point to a Second Founding Society in North America

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "In a follow up to my earlier post, the New York Times reports that a team from the University of Oregon has published a paper (paywalled) detailing recent finds in caves near Paisley, Oregon that point to non-Clovis people living in the area at the same time that the Clovis People inhabited North America. From the New York Times article:
"Stone spearheads and human DNA found in Oregon caves, anthropologists say, have produced firmer evidence that these are the oldest directly dated remains of people in North America. They also show that at least two cultures with distinct technologies — not a single one, as had been supposed — shared the continent more than 13,000 years ago.""

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Earliest Americans Arrived in Waves, DNA Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Nicholas Wade of the New York Times writes:

North and South America were first populated by three waves of migrants from Siberia rather than just a single migration, say researchers who have studied the whole genomes of Native Americans in South America and Canada.
Some scientists assert that the Americas were peopled in one large migration from Siberia that happened about 15,000 years ago, but the new genetic research shows that this central episode was followed by at least two smaller migrations from Siberia, one by people who became the ancestors of today’s Eskimos and Aleutians and another by people speaking Na-Dene, whose descendants are confined to North America

The study, published online (this is a paywalled site, sorry.) investigated geographic, linguistic and genetic diversity in native American populations."
Link to Original Source

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Florida accused of concealing worst tuberculosis outbreak in 20 years

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  about 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The state of Florida has been struggling for months with what the Centers for Disease Control describe as the worst tuberculosis outbreak in the United States in twenty years.

Although a CDC report went out to state health officials in April encouraging them to take concerted action, the warning went largely unnoticed and nothing has been done. The public did not even learn of the outbreak until June, after a man with an active case of TB was spotted in a Jacksonville soup kitchen.

The Palm Beach Post has managed to obtain records on the outbreak and the CDC report, though only after weeks of repeated requests. These documents should have been freely available under Florida’s Sunshine Law."

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Moody's Cuts Credit Ratings of 15 Big Banks

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Moody's Investor's Service says they're concerned about risks to the big (including the "too big to fail") banks. Predictably, the banks try to deflect the issue by claiming that Moody's is living in the past and all that risky stuff should be considered water under the bridge. So which is it? Are the banks still engaging in risky activities which could give us a repeat of 2008, or is Moody's just looking to shake down the banks?

Or is it both? Where was Moody's during the housing boom? Busy giving high ratings to instruments jam-packed with bad loans. It's kind of hard to trust these guy now, eh?"

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Web Sites Shine Light on Petty Bribery Worldwide

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The cost of claiming a legitimate income tax refund in Hyderabad, India? 10,000 rupees.
The going rate to get a child who has already passed the entrance requirements into high school in Nairobi, Kenya? 20,000 shillings.
The expense of obtaining a driver’s license after having passed the test in Karachi, Pakistan? 3,000 rupees.
Such is the price of what Swati Ramanathan calls “retail corruption,” the sort of nickel-and-dime bribery, as opposed to large-scale graft, that infects everyday life in so many parts of the world.

Ms. Ramanathan and her husband, Ramesh, along with Sridar Iyengar, set out to change all that in August 2010 when they started ipaidabribe.com, a site that collects anonymous reports of bribes paid, bribes requested but not paid and requests that were expected but not forthcoming."

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Scannable Condoms Allow Users to 'Check-In' During Safe Sex

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Want to take social media to the next level? Chances are you’ve probably never heard of “checking in” when you have sex, or more specifically when you and your partner are engaging in protected sex.

Now you can brag to the world you’ve just got laid by checking in to a new geo-location website with details of where, why, who you used a condom with, and how the “safe sex was”"

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Marijuana Smoking Does Not Harm Lungs, Study Finds

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "A large new government study has found that smoking marijuana on a regular basis, even over many years, does not impair lung function.

The study, abstract here (full JAMA article paywalled), concluded that "Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use was not associated with adverse effects on pulmonary function." By contrast, the researchers found that compared to nonsmokers, marijuana users performed slightly better on lung function tests, though the improvement was minuscule."

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Plan to Widen Availability of Morning-After Pill I

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Wednesday overruled the Food and Drug Administration's decision that emergency contraceptives be sold freely over the counter, including to teenagers 16 years old and younger.

The pill, called Plan B One-Step, has been available without a prescription to women 17 and older, but those 16 and younger have needed a prescription — and still will because of Ms. Sebelius’s decision.

FDA Commissioner Dr. Margaret A. Hamburg, wrote that all the studies and experts agreed that young women would benefit from having easy access to Plan B.

The agency’s scientists, she wrote, “determined that the product was safe and effective in adolescent females, that adolescent females understood the product was not for routine use, and that the product would not protect them against sexually transmitted disease.”

This is a cabinet officer in a *Democratic* administration, and a female one at that, doing such a blatantly anti-women, anti-choice, anti-good sense thing! Geez Louise!"

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The Way Forward Moving From the Post-Bubble, Post-

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "The title of the white paper is, admittedly, a mouthful: “The Way Forward: Moving From the Post-Bubble, Post-Bust Economy to Renewed Growth and Competitiveness.” It was commissioned by the New America Foundation, which hoped that it might “re-center the political debate to better reflect the country’s deep economic problems,” according to Sherle Schwenninger, the director of the foundation’s Economic Growth Program. Its authors are Daniel Alpert, a managing partner of Westwood Capital; Robert Hockett, a professor of financial law at Cornell and a consultant to the New York Federal Reserve; and Nouriel Roubini, who is, well, Nouriel Roubini, whose consistently bearish views have been consistently right. It is scheduled to be released on Wednesday."
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An Immune System Trained to Kill Cancer

NotSanguine NotSanguine writes  |  more than 2 years ago

NotSanguine (1917456) writes "A year ago, when chemotherapy stopped working against his leukemia, William Ludwig signed up to be the first patient treated in a bold experiment at the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Ludwig, then 65, a retired corrections officer from Bridgeton, N.J., felt his life draining away and thought he had nothing to lose.
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Gene Therapy
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University of Pennsylvania

Tiny magnetic beads force the larger T-cells to divide before they are infused into the patient.

Doctors removed a billion of his T-cells — a type of white blood cell that fights viruses and tumors — and gave them new genes that would program the cells to attack his cancer. Then the altered cells were dripped back into Mr. Ludwig’s veins."

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