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Iran Plans To Unplug the Internet, Launch Its Own 'Clean' Alternative

Original Replica Re:It is a dirty place... (301 comments)

I am amused by how easily I got a "troll" rating for a post that spoke jokingly in favor of internet censorship.

more than 2 years ago
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Iran Plans To Unplug the Internet, Launch Its Own 'Clean' Alternative

Original Replica Re:Conservatism (301 comments)

I think you find that totalitarians of any political bent are the ones who want "top-down, society-comes-from-the-government policies. " Yes, in America the liberal whackjobs are more likely to call for totalitarianism. However, when it comes to actual government leaders and what it is that they actually do with their power, I think you will find very little difference between "liberal" and "conservative" in the march towards increasing government control. They only differ on the route they take, supposed liberals take the welfare/healthcare/gun-control route while supposed conservatives take the military/DHS/War-on-Drugs route. The "conservative embrace of a constitutional republic's checks and balances" is only embraced by the conservative voters, not the people they elect to represent them. Ron Paul being the exception that proves it. Look to effect of the NDAA 2012 combined with the Enemy Expatriation Act and the level of bi-partisan support for those Constitution destroying bills.

more than 2 years ago
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Best Buy CEO Brian Dunn Resigns After $1.7 Billion Loss

Original Replica Re:Only choice (513 comments)

Having a brick and mortar option is important. One of Best Buy's big problems was "showcasing", where people would come in, look and touch the physical products, deciding which they wanted, and then go search the internet for the lowest prices. This also highlights a big problem with modern capitalism: if a company isn't eternally growing, then they are deemed a failure. Simply providing goods and services and jobs doesn't count as success. It's only if you have ever rising stock prices that you are "successful".

more than 2 years ago
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Iran Plans To Unplug the Internet, Launch Its Own 'Clean' Alternative

Original Replica It is a dirty place... (301 comments)

As far as a "clean" internet goes it does have some merit. The real internet is 35% porn.It is defensible to want a cleaner, walled garden version of it. Maybe Iran could just use AOL.

more than 2 years ago
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Internet Responds To Racist Article, Gets Author Fired

Original Replica Re:Few to admit it, but a lot of parents teach thi (1208 comments)

Sorry but white males are never ever allowed to be the victim. It would cause a huge crash in the value of the race card, and that might require people to take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences.

more than 2 years ago
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Internet Responds To Racist Article, Gets Author Fired

Original Replica Re:Few to admit it, but a lot of parents teach thi (1208 comments)

Or do they simply learn that their roles aren't valued by society and take any chance they can to assert dominance

Therein cementing their devaluation by society. The only way that anti-black racism will go away in America is for the vast majority of black people to identify productivity, competence and civility as their cultural hallmarks, and actively separate themselves from the black people who don't uphold those ideals. (in much the same way as average white people actively separate themselves from white trash) As proof of concept, look to the Asian-Americans. Asians are just as visually distinctive, yet very little discrimination comparatively, there is even some preferential treatment in the job market.

more than 2 years ago
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Internet Responds To Racist Article, Gets Author Fired

Original Replica Re:Few to admit it, but a lot of parents teach thi (1208 comments)

In the areas of theft, robbery, and violent crime the demographic break down of convictions is very close to the demographic break down reported to the police by the victims. There is not an inherent racism in the justice system along that line. It would be just as ridiculous to say that there is inherent sexism in the justice system because the vast majority of convicts are male. Even when a crime victim identifies their attacker as a male, the police should look at women as well when searching for the assailant, just to make sure they aren't being sexist.

While it has nothing to do with racial genetics, there is an American sub-culture, largely among urban blacks, that is accepting or even encouraging of criminal activity. Thug Life ideals are just as much a generator of crime and violence as Aryan Nation ideas, yet the they have very different levels of acceptability in general society. The first step towards fixing a problem is admitting that there is a problem.

more than 2 years ago
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FBI Says American Universities Infiltrated by Spies

Original Replica Re:How about sharing? (418 comments)

When did the competition between countries end in your world?

When we realized that the competition only serves to increase the wealth and power of the aristocracy (in what ever form it takes in different countries)

Any rich country will sooner carpet bomb a poor country that lower it's standard of living to reach the average.

Obviously false. The US exported it's entire manufacturing sector to China to do exactly the opposite of that. It raised China towards the average and stagnated the US median, while vastly increasing the wealth of the aristocracy.

more than 2 years ago
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FBI Says American Universities Infiltrated by Spies

Original Replica Re:OH MY GOD (418 comments)

The CIA will never ever be able to admit peace, safety, or success. There must always be impending doom to keep the CIA budget high and the oversight low.

more than 2 years ago
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FBI Says American Universities Infiltrated by Spies

Original Replica Re:World Responds (418 comments)

Virtually all of us are infested with CIA. What's the problem?

The CIA: The cause of, and solution to, all of America's problems.

more than 2 years ago
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Major Textbook Publishers Sue Open-Education Textbook Start-Up

Original Replica Re:Boo hoo for the dinosaurs (278 comments)

Which is why we need a law that requires the claimant to pay for the defense's legal costs if the case is found to be frivolous or abusive. I believe there is such a law in the UK. I shed no tears for textbook publishers getting their well deserved comeuppance.

more than 2 years ago
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Slashdot Poll

Original Replica CFLs are so 2010 (3 comments)

I have a dimmable, white light LED bulb in every overhead fixture in my apartment. It's wasn't cheap but it was worth it for the energy savings. They put out a much better light then the CFLs and they are dimmable, but they dim grey not amber the way an incandescent does. That takes getting used to.

more than 2 years ago
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Civil liberties through complex mathamatics?

Original Replica you could only use it in a 1st amendment zone (2 comments)

Building any information distribution system that would be too difficult for the government to shut down would likely be labeled as an act of cyber-terrorism and the builder and users would be subject to military detention under the NDAA. You can't use the internet like the when it's 1984.

more than 2 years ago
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Earth's Core Made In Miniature

Original Replica Re:How they know... (175 comments)

I believe the physical model will experience gravity in one direction, whereas the simulated model doesn't have to?

Does not the Earth also experience gravity in primarily one direction? I hope they built the model so that gravity pulls at 57.5 degrees off the spinning axis.

more than 2 years ago
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Scott Adams Proposes a Fourth Branch of Government

Original Replica Re:Better idea (341 comments)

"political donations of any type are a form of corruption".

Donations should only be allowed to candidates that the donor is legally allowed to vote for. Corporations, unions, and lobbies could not give any money. Also multi-millionaires could not give outside of their state or district. All donations should be fed through a "Voter Contribution Department" that sends donations to the intended candidate, but anonimizes the donors, not only removing the names, but issuing the moneys daily to the campaign on a rolling one month average. Advertising "paid for by The Friends of CandidateX" should then be illegal and all contributors to "Friends of CandidateX" should be prosecuted for tampering with the election process. People may only place advertisements on land they own, and speak support from the mouth (and online identities) that they own.

more than 2 years ago
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Simulated Mars Mission 'Returns' After 520 Days

Original Replica Re:Zero G (201 comments)

Why on why would they ever send out a Mars mission without spinning the living quarters on a long tether? Counter weight the tether with computers/sensors/batteries and put the weight variable items like fuel at the axis. 2000' tether at 1/2 rpm will give a reasonable gravity and have minimal nausea producing effects. If ISS did any real experiments, instead of shoebox tests designed by high school classes, centrifugal gravity for space would have most of the kinks worked out by now.

more than 2 years ago
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Hacker Group LulzSec Challenges FBI

Original Replica Re:Haha (308 comments)

Sadly the service that LulzSec is providing is that of: "Now Feds have reason for totalitarian internet laws and broad ISP log searches."

more than 3 years ago
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High-Tech Gas Drilling Is Fouling Drinking Water

Original Replica Re:but but (390 comments)

Is there, or is there not a strong geographic and temporal correlation between fracking sites and flammable well water?

We do not know what the incidence of methane in the water was in those wells before the gas companies started fracking.

What is the probability that people previously failed to notice flammable water?

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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"Shut up! You don't get a lawyer."

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Original Replica (908688) writes "The National Defense Authorization Act, basically codifies "1984" into US law.

The NDAA contains a ludicrously un-American and anti-democratic section allowing the US military to detain, torture/interrogate, and even kill American citizens without providing access to a trial or attorney. All that required is the accusation of being a terrorist.

"I'm very, very, concerned about having U.S. citizens sent to Guantanamo Bay for indefinite detention," said Sen. Rand Paul R-Ky

"Congress is essentially authorizing the indefinite imprisonment of American citizens, without charge," said Sen. Dianne Feinstein D-Calif

Senator Lindsey Graham, R-SC, said it would be “crazy” to exempt Qaeda suspects who are Americans and are arrested inside the country from battlefield-style detention. He argued that, to stop other attacks, they must be interrogated without the protections of the civilian criminal justice system. Citizens who are suspected of joining Al Qaeda are opening themselves up “to imprisonment and death,” Mr. Graham said, adding, “And when they say, ‘I want my lawyer,’ you tell them: ‘Shut up. You don’t get a lawyer.

This is a problem for everyone."

Link to Original Source
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GOP IT consultant dies in unlikely plane crash

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Original Replica writes "Mike Connell, a top level Republican IT consultant who was set to testify in a case alleging GOP election tampering in Ohio He was scheduled to testify in an election tampering case. Add to this: "Mr. Connell has confided that he was being threatened, something that his attorneys also told the judge in the Ohio election fraud case,"
I'm not sayin' he was assasinated, but Occam sure does."

Link to Original Source
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Bill to make anonymous internet posting illegal

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Original Replica (908688) writes "Soon the law might require that your name and address would be attached to your goatse troll, +5 insightful or anything else you care to contribute to any online discussion.

Do you really want your online persona to be visibly connected to your real life home address?"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 5 years ago "Consider the difference in accountability between individuals unable to pay their debts and corporations that default on their pension plans. Under the new bankruptcy law enacted last year by a Congress eager to reward their campaign contributors in the credit industry, the vast majority of common folk saddled by unmanageable debt--usually because of severe misfortune, such as medical emergencies, job loss, or divorce - will be deemed to be in possession of "excess income" and will no longer be permitted to wipe the slate clean. Instead, they'll be put on an accelerated payment schedule for a 3-5 year period at a much higher rate of interest and forced to pay for "fiscal management" classes in addition to lawyers' fees. How poor will you have to be to avoid this fate? Let's put it this way. A couple each earning measly minimum wage for a total of $21,840 per year with no dependents? According to the new "means test," that couple is $9,720 over the so-called poverty threshold, or stated similarly, earning 80.2% "excess" annual income. Those sluggards will just have to pay up. But it's an entirely different story when corporations fail to meet their financial obligations to their workers--which is increasingly the case. As Roger Lowenstein notes in a recent article on the end of pensions, "Corporations were happy to offer rich retirement plans to their workers as long as accounting tricks and federal insurance made it easy to delay the day of reckoning." And why not? When the day of reckoning comes, the firm won't sell off its assets to pay for the failed plan or garnish the wages of the CEO (who, on average, earned $9.84 million, or 358 times the average worker's pay last year). Debt from the failed plan becomes the responsibility of the government's pension insurer, the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC)--currently in the red to the tune of $23 billion (and estimated to bloom to $200 billion within two decades). Which means that average taxpayers like you and me will pay the corporation's debts while it goes merrily on its way. Because that's what "personal responsibility" really means to this administration. When it comes to covering bad debt from corporations that underestimate how much they need to put away to keep their commitments, it's on us. Ditto for when businesses game the system by exploiting lax rules that allow them to get away with inadequately funding their pension plans. Or promise the world to their workers, knowing that there's a safety net if they ever get in too deep. And when it comes to shouldering debt from bad individual luck, that's on us too."http://rawstory.com/news/2005/The_new_Gilded_Age_0104.html

"I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me and causes me to tremble for the safety of my country. As a result of the war, corporations have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until all wealth is aggregated in a few hands and the Republic is destroyed."- Abraham Lincoln

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Too big to fail, and Monopoly law.

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 5 years ago Various corporations around the world have recently been in danger of collapse because of poor financial choices. However they were deemed "too big to fail" and were bailed out by taxpayers, because the failure of said companies was deemed a great danger to the global economy. Now let us turn to ideas behind anti-trust law and see what light this shines on companies whose influence is so great that their failure could endanger the global economy.Now anti-trust laws came to be in order to deal with companies that controlled such a high percentage of a commodity, that they could unfairly influence or destroy other businesses trading in that commodity, and that they could restrict supplies to the public in such a way that would allow for price gouging or denial of that resource to the public. Standard Oil had such a monopoly, both on oil and on jobs in the oil industry. They would use unfair influence and market leverage to destroy or absorb competing companies and they would use their control of the oil job market to unfairly manipulate their workforce. They controlled the flow of oil and they held hostage the jobs in the oil industry. Standard Oil controlled roughly 88% of the US refined oil market. But is such a high percentage of control necessary to present those same dangers when the commodity in question is money itself, and what percentage of the GDP does a company need to present a national or international danger if it were to suddenly go bankrupt?

I'm far from the first person to ponder such things. Some say that you cannot disallow banks to be too-big-to-fail " since substantially all the major banks are at this point TBTF. And you can't just break up a bank like you might break up a monopoly, along natural lines of business, since even if JP Morgan spun off its derivatives desk into an independent trading house, that independent trading house would still be TBTF."
While others argue "the anti-capitalist large corporations are not monopolies - they are oligopolistic that can still extract profits through their ability to distort the free market. Is the fact they are not a monopoly really that relevant? Enforcing rules that prevent businesses from using their size and power to extract outsized profits is the right thing to do. Anti-trust laws are the proper tool." Being forced to buy up the bad investments of those companies (because of their size) isn't all that different then the use of size to extract outsized profits, or simply extorting money from the taxpayers.
Regardless of whether the market would have corrected itself had those companies been allowed to collapse, the situation we are in now has made every giant corporation a potential liability to the taxpayer. Does that liability justify maximum limits on the economic size of a corporation? Does that mean that Communism has achieved the same kind of victory that Capitalism did in the 80's, proof of superiority through the economic collapse of the opposing ideology?

Kevin Phillips wrote in his book, Wealth and Democracy: "The current of extreme economic disparities are simply not sustainable without serious damage to the country's productivity patterns and performance." Perhaps this collapse is just a symptom of a terribly unbalanced system.

This economic implosion was predicted back in 2002.

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The national security oxymoron

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 6 years ago So often these days we are presented with measures that claim to be for "National Security" which claim that we must surrender various rights to protect our nation. But to determine the veracity of these statements we must carefully consider: What is our nation? Certainly the president is a big part of our nation, but only for four years at a stretch. Maybe Congress is the core of our nation, for a few decades of service from the most successful congressmen. Maybe the nation's core is our people, although we have such a wide variety of viewpoints and beliefs and they change throughout our lifetimes. So what is the lasting core of our nation? The Constitution is that thing that makes America the place that is. If the Constitution read like Mao's little red book, then America would be like the PRC rather than the country we have. If China had been operating for the last 200 years with the US Constitution as it's government's foundation, then China would be a vastly different place.
Ok so the Constitution (and rule of law) is the core of America, why does that matter? We still have to stop the terrorists. Well it matters because of National Security. If the core of our nation is the Constitution, then the foremost objective of National Security should be ensuring that the Constitution remains undamaged as the driving force of our government. National Security should be protecting the rights and protections and balances of the Constitution from fear of Nazis or fear Communists or fear of Terrorists. Allowing those fears to distort or weaken the Constitution does far more damage than bombs or bullets. People die. Building crumble. New people are born, and new buildings are built. But a wound to the Constitution will endure throughout the duration of America's existence as a country.
Some may say: "In extreme times we must damage America to save America." It cannot be done, there have always been and will always be "extreme times". There will always be a foreign danger, there will always be internal struggles. There are some who may say: "I will do what ever must be done to protect my country, the law be damned." What is the damage you are protecting us from that is so huge that you must diminish the rule of law to overcome it? Let us imagine that you must protect us from something as terrible as ICBM Nuke hitting New York City. Well what would happen? 10 million people (3% of our population) would die earlier than they would have otherwise. The global financial world would take a huge hit. A major cultural center would be lost. It might an entire generation before enough new business leaders and artists and capital grew to replace that lost to a nuked NYC. But America would recover so long as we all held fast to those things which make us American. But what is lost when the power of the Constitution and the rule of law is diminished? Well, on average, the rule of law explains 57 percent of countries' intangible capital while schooling accounts for 36 percent. The World Bank has devised a rule-of-law index that measures the extent to which people have confidence in and abide by the rules of their society. An economy with a very efficient judicial system, clear property rights, and an effective government will produce higher total wealth. So when our Constitution is damaged, we loose some of our intangible capital, that's not so bad is it? Take a look at the transition Zimbabwe has made in the last ten years if you want to know what a major loss of intangible capital will do. Once the protections and rights of a people are seized by the government they do not ever return under that power of that same government. So either America will crumble or every following generation will suffer the loss when government agents act in ways which diminish the rule of law. This isn't the place to do a cost benefit analysis of the CIA, but I have no doubts that we would have won the Cold War without their help, and we would be far more loved and respected in the world community if they had never existed. And we would have more intangible capital, and we would be a wealthier and more free nation.

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Bill proposed to make anonymous internet posting illegal

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 6 years ago Soon the law might require that your name and address would be attached to your goatse troll, +5 insightful or anything else you care to contribute to any online discussion.

Do you really want your online persona to be visibly connected to your real life home address?

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The death of Fair Use and Internet Radio

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 7 years ago From Reason Magazine, we get the history of the pay-per-listener fees that are now going to kill all Internet Radio. "October 1992, when President George Bush signed the Audio Home Recording Act, which taxed digital audio equipment and media in order to "pay back" copyright holders for their added risk in this brave new digital era. Next, the World Intellectual Property Organization debates of the mid-90s advanced the idea that the United State had to "normalize" its copyright rules to the rest of world. A world that, interestingly enough, lacked either fair use or a First Amendment."

But apparently that is just the tip of the liscensing iceberg."Make no mistake, the death of Net radio is merely a means to an end--the end being the rollback of any notion of fair use of copyrighted digital content. The goal is nothing less than a licensing regime for all digital music that recognizes no ownership rights, fair or otherwise." http://www.reason.com/news/show/121281.html

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OneVoice = peace for the people.

Original Replica Original Replica writes  |  more than 7 years ago As many people realize, the existance of a "common enemy" is an excellent political tool for gaining power. It is used the world over, both to polarize the masses and to silence dissent. OneVoiceMovement.org has taken the approach of bypassing the "leaders" and connecting the people to affirm want everyone wants: peace and prosperity. All this from a YouTube Video.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34bVcLMrcRs Could a similar approach be used to mend America/Iraqi relations, and diffuse the attack/counterattack cycle?

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