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San Francisco's Housing Crisis Explained

Ost99 Re:BS (359 comments)

And that matters why?
The cost of living there is interest + maintenance.

If you had the money already, the cost of living there is the interest you could have gotten on an investment of similar risk + maintenance.

4 days ago
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San Francisco's Housing Crisis Explained

Ost99 Re:BS (359 comments)

Irrelevant.
What was interest rates back then?
The relevant number is the % of income spent on paying interest on your mortgage.

4 days ago
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Transhumanist Children's Book Argues, "Death Is Wrong"

Ost99 Re:Irresponsible or what? (334 comments)

Current capacity is somewhere north of 50 billion. That's without any new technology.

about a month ago
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Ask Slashdot: MMORPG Recommendations?

Ost99 Re:I recommend non - MMO (555 comments)

Try EVE. No two days are ever the same.

about 5 months ago
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Why Not Fund SETI With a Lottery Bond?

Ost99 Re:Well (191 comments)

Detectable in a SETI sense, that is detactable from 10s or 100s of lightyears away.

Good luck picking up a satellite-TV or DAB radio transmission 100 light years away.
Communication is moving away from high effect broadcast to point-to-point.

about 5 months ago
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Why Not Fund SETI With a Lottery Bond?

Ost99 Re:Well (191 comments)

We've more or less stopped using detectable radio signals ourselves. Most communication is now carried in fiber optics, and the radio we use is either satellite or many small low power transmitters transmitting encrypted traffic.

Give it another 20-30 years, and we would not be transmitting anything by radio that could be picked outside our solar system.

about 5 months ago
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What Valve's Announcements Mean for Gaming

Ost99 Re:This is the future (182 comments)

You see, it's because if you want a standard platform for gaming, there's one above the rest - Windows. Like it or not, that's the truth.

What Valve understood, but you fail to understand is that this is the way it WAS. It's no longer true with Windows 8, 8.1 and Microsofts plans and new limitations.

about 7 months ago
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What's Causing the Rise In Obesity? Everything.

Ost99 Re:Sugar (926 comments)

HFCS and regular sugar are similar, but there's still a difference in how the body responds.
Tests on animals have shown significant damage from intake of HFCS not present in animals consuming the same amount of regular sugar.
Why? Don't think they know yet.

Regular sugar contains fructose and glucose in the form of sucrose. HFCS contains free fructose and glucose and also contains various traces from the starch -> sugar conversion.

Does the hydrolysis in the body that breaks up sucrose also trigger something else that reduces the effect of fructose in the liver?
Does sucrase regulate hydrolysis of sucrose and thereby reduces the amount of glucose and fructose available to the body compared to HFCS?
Does HFCS somehow disturb sucrase production?

Is is possible that the HFCS still contains enough trace amounts of the amino acids used to break down the starch to create a similar reaction in the food consumed together with the HFCS?
Are the proteins present after the HFCS process harmful?

about 8 months ago
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Evolution of AI Interplanetary Trajectories Reaches Human-Competitive Levels

Ost99 Re:Optimization by hand sucks. (52 comments)

Eh.
It's not beating optimization by hand, it's beating computerized optimization of all plausible options worked on by experts in the field.

about 9 months ago
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According To YouGov Poll, Snowden Support Declining Among Americans

Ost99 Re:Weasely "interpretation" of Constitution (658 comments)

Gitmo is just as bad, if not worse than post-Stalin gulag. I'd take work-camps over systematic torture any day.

As for the 2nd paragraph, I don't understand what your argument is. The USSR fell in large part due to influence from western agents.

about 9 months ago
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According To YouGov Poll, Snowden Support Declining Among Americans

Ost99 Re:Weasely "interpretation" of Constitution (658 comments)

Western agents posed a much more real threat to the USSR and the USSR way of life than terrorists pose the US and the american way of life.

Evil has taken root in your government, and you must speak out now before doing so will be outlawed and you find yourself shipped off to your version of the gulag.

Make no mistake, the current abuses of power in the US is just as bad as anything that happened in post Stalin USSR.

about 9 months ago
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Teenage League of Legends Player Jailed For Months For Facebook Joke

Ost99 Re:So much for... (743 comments)

Oh -- and about seatbelts: There's no question that they make folks who are belted in safer. However, it's also well-established that they make people who aren't belted in -- such as pedestrians -- less safe: Drivers behave more recklessly when they feel secure, and seat belts and anti-lock brakes provide such security.

But the overall reduction in fatalities is still reduced significantly.
Where I live the fatalities pr transported km have been reduced by a factor of 20 for children since before seat belt and child safety seats where required by law. For adults the reduction due to improved cars, airbags etc. is a factor of 4 in the same period.

We have ~200-250 car related fatalities a year, of which ~20 are pedestrians.
Of the ~150 car related ones ~50% did not wear a seat belt. 1-2% of the population does not wear seat belts.

about 10 months ago
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Boston Marathon Bomber Charged With Using 'Weapon of Mass Destruction'

Ost99 Re:We're making this all up anyway (533 comments)

Depends on your POV.
Elections are peaceful revolutions. Use that power to throw out the clowns.

about 10 months ago
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When GPL Becomes Almost-GPL — the CSS, Images and JavaScript Loophole

Ost99 Re:HTML is a container (224 comments)

CSS, images and javascript (if the code itself is not derived from the platform source) is no more a derivative work than a photo frame is a derivative work of a (specific) photo.
Both can change the look of another work without changing the original work - both can, with minor adjustments, be used with other works.

I don't like what they are doing, but I don't understand how any sane interpretation of copyright laws could find this to be considered infringement.
If this somehow creates a derivative work, then all browser-plugins that change the way any webpage looks or behaves is also infringing.
Adblock -> gone
In browser spellcheck -> gone
Screen reader for the blind -> gone
Firebug -> gone
Selector gadget -> gone

about 10 months ago
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When GPL Becomes Almost-GPL — the CSS, Images and JavaScript Loophole

Ost99 Re:HTML is a container (224 comments)

AFAIK the GPL only applies to linking. The JS and the server software are not combined to form one program in any sensible definition of linking.

BUT if the non-free javascript / css itself is a derivative of the javascript or css it replaces, it becomes GPL.

about 10 months ago
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When GPL Becomes Almost-GPL — the CSS, Images and JavaScript Loophole

Ost99 Re:No, it's not. (224 comments)

Categorizing javascript as art might get earn you a new shirt and a nice padded room without a view.

It all depends on whether the javascript (or CSS) is a derivative work of the platform code or not.

about 10 months ago
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Mining the Heavens: In Conversation With Planetary Resources' Chief Engineer

Ost99 Re:Creepy libertarianism (80 comments)

It's not a chicken-and-egg problem, it's a delusion and cluelessness problem.

Several of the worlds most successful businessmen are investing in this.
Take a look at the list of advisers and investors: http://www.planetaryresources.com/team/
Clueless would not be the first word that comes to mind as characteristic for that group.

With plans for permanent lunar installations, probably within the next 10-20 years (China, India and Japan all have plans for permanent facilities on the moon - the US might also enter the race) the market will be there by the time the asteroid capture and mining is up and running. Add the possibility of Mars mission(s) (American, Chinese or private) before 2040 and the mining business looks good.

Any new space station (ISS replacement, moon logistics station at L1 or low moon orbit, mars staging station at Moon L2) would benefit tremendously from having materials available without having to pay the gravity tax.

about 10 months ago
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Mining the Heavens: In Conversation With Planetary Resources' Chief Engineer

Ost99 Re:My usual question, not answered thus far... (80 comments)

We'll probably remove more mass than we add.
Asteroid mining is for getting materials for space based structures and industry.
Very few materials have a high enough value on earth to justify the cost of asteroid mining.

about 10 months ago
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Mining the Heavens: In Conversation With Planetary Resources' Chief Engineer

Ost99 Re:Creepy libertarianism (80 comments)

Chicken and egg problem. Who cares if the market is not there yet? We will get nowhere in any field if we let details like that stop us. And it's going to take decades just developing the tech and getting the first roids. The investors are in it for long term, and from what they've said publicly, it's just as much about enabling a space presence as profiting from it.

We cannot build a large scale infrastructure in space without either asteroid mining or a space elevator. There seems to be less technological unknowns that needs to be solved in order to start asteroid mining.

It makes more sense to start with the mining, then build whatever you need in space.
They are probably decades away from making the mining a reality. Eventually there will be a market for it.

about 10 months ago
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Mining the Heavens: In Conversation With Planetary Resources' Chief Engineer

Ost99 Re:Creepy libertarianism (80 comments)

The raw materials are never meant to be returned to earth.
While a ton of iron ore is worth less than nothing here, transporting it to LEO costs $10M (multiply that by 5 if you want it on the moon).
Our space capabilities are limited by the cost of getting stuff out of earths gravity well.

Asteroid mining would sell raw materials and water to other space ventures, private or public.

about 10 months ago

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