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Comments

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Cracked Game Released To Get Back At Pirates

Ostracus Re:slashdotted, cloudflare fail, here's a copy-pas (509 comments)

I agree with the publisher, but I'm afraid we're going to have to go far down the rabbit hole before the majority give up their pirate ways.

about a year and a half ago
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Artificial Skin Sensitivity Rivals That of Human Skin

Ostracus Overwelming. (29 comments)

I think the problem isn't having as many sensitive sensors as possible. It's integrating their output into a larger sensor framework.

about a year and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are There Any Good Reasons For DRM?

Ostracus Creativity doesn't need remuneration (684 comments)

And what about ALL the people who go to work every day? Are they being creative for a paycheck? Or is this argument the exclusive domain of artists?

about a year and a half ago
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Inside Mantis: a 2-Ton Hexapod Robot With a Linux Brain

Ostracus BEAM me up. (84 comments)

Wonder if BEAM is being used behind the scenes?

about a year and a half ago
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Do Nations Have the Right To Kill Enemy Hackers?

Ostracus Star Trek Justice. (482 comments)

Do Nations Have the Right To Kill Enemy Hackers?

I mandate that all enemy computers, be like the consoles in Star Trek. "Take THAT enemy combatant! *ZZZAAPPP!*".

about a year ago
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Nanoscale 3D Printer Now Commercially Available

Ostracus A buggy proposition. (127 comments)

So with this printer will I be able to create nano-spy-bugs?

about a year and a half ago
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Pwnie Express Releases Pwn Pad Ahead of Schedule

Ostracus Breaking & entering. (24 comments)

Today they've launched their latest product, continuing along the same line of hiding cutting edge open source security tools in plain sight

I'll be impressed when they come out with the Pwn Condom.

about a year and a half ago
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Can Valve's 'Bossless' Company Model Work Elsewhere?

Ostracus There's oil in that thair managment. (522 comments)

"I just listened to a fascinating podcast with Valve's economist-in-residence, Yanis Varoufakis, about the unusual structure of the workplace at Valve where there is no hierarchy or bosses.

Can't remember the book, but there was a Brazilian oil company that had a similar structure.

about a year and a half ago
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Tech Leaders Encourage Teaching Schoolkids How To Code

Ostracus Educational singularities. (265 comments)

"Code.org has released infographics and a video to explain why students should be taught to code in school.

I'm sure I'm going to offend quite a few, but in the grand scheme of things, why that particular set of skills? We could be teaching people other, just as important, fields, so why single out coding?

about a year and a half ago
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We Aren't the World: Why Americans Make Bad Study Subjects

Ostracus The myth of the "universal" westerner. (450 comments)

Studies show that Western urban children grow up so closed off in man-made environments that their brains never form a deep or complex connection to the natural world.

So what does their study say about "western" who have been raised rural?

about a year and a half ago
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Google Patents Staple of '70s Mainframe Computing

Ostracus It's not old til you've married it. (333 comments)

Hey, things are new if you've never seen them before!

Just wait till you all grow up and discover cougars.

about 2 years ago
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Discourse: Next-Generation Discussion/Web Forum Software

Ostracus Re:Interesting idea (141 comments)

How about putting close at hand the tools to make a better, more educated post? Note Spellcheckers, and Wikipedia are close by. Wolfram Alpha for another, although none are integrated. Grammar and math checkers next.

about 2 years ago
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WindowsAndroid Lets You Run Android 4.0 Natively On Your PC

Ostracus Android on a stick. (190 comments)

$25 ARM on a stick Plug that into my monitor's HDMI and using bluetooth and there's my "ICS" experience.

about 2 years ago
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CES: IN WIN Displays Costly but Beautiful Computer Cases (Video)

Ostracus Computer safety gear. (141 comments)

Looks like a roll-over cage for a computer. Handy if your computer crashes.

about 2 years ago
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Amid Fiscal Uncertainty, Venture Capital Is Way Down In Silicon Valley

Ostracus Taking stock of /. (421 comments)

Amid Fiscal Uncertainty Venture Capital Is Way Down In Silicon Valley

Ummm, is this a good time to invest in Slashdot? :)

about 2 years ago
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Tesla Motors Sued By Car Dealers

Ostracus Re:Translation: (510 comments)

For that my new business model is patenting making snarky comments, and making a fortune off of people like you.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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Virtualization, The Rise of the Avatar & the O

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "Odd as it may seem to some of you, my online persona is no different than millions of others. If you traverse the blogs and forums and websites of the World Wide Web, you will find that those who choose to be exactly what they are in real life on the net as well are in a minority. From elves to vampires, klingons to anime cat-girls, cartoon characters to movie stars, the face worn by the majority of netizens is rarely the one they wear in daily life."
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The Year's Most Pirated Videos

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus writes "Despite free streaming video sites like Hulu, peer-to-peer video piracy is booming.

A word of advice to film and television execs frustrated by online video piracy: Stay away from superheroes."

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Computer scientist mods Xbox 360 to detect heart a

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus writes "A computer scientist at the University in Warwick has developed a method to use Microsoft's Xbox 360 to detect heart defects and help prevent heart attacks."
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The Cellphone, Navigating Our Lives

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "The cellphone is the world's most ubiquitous computer. The four billion cellphones in use around the globe carry personal information, provide access to the Web and are being used more and more to navigate the real world. And as cellphones change how we live, computer scientists say, they are also changing how we think about information."
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Professors could rescue newspapers

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "New York — The American newspaper is dead. Long live the American newspaper!

OK, so reports of the demise of daily journalism are a bit premature. But you can't open up the newspapers today without reading bad news about the papers.

Declining circulation and advertising revenues have forced newsrooms to trim their staffs, which means less real reporting. A few city papers have closed — the most recent victim was Denver's 150-year-old Rocky Mountain News — while others fill their pages with fluff pieces or wire-service stories. Put simply, it's getting too expensive to gather news.

So here's a novel idea: Let's get university professors to do it. For real. And, best of all, free of charge."

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Crisis in the US newspaper industry

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "If the economic crisis goes on much longer, will there be any newspapers left in the US to write about it?
America's newspaper industry has been badly hit by the downturn, and a number of titles face closure. The latest casualty is the venerable San Francisco Chronicle, whose owners on Wednesday announced they were planning to cut a "significant" number of jobs to meet cost-cutting targets, and that if the targets are not met, then the paper would be sold or closed down."

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Could 'liquid wood' replace plastic?

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "Almost 40 years ago, American scientists took their first steps in a quest to break the world's dependence on plastics.

But in those four decades, plastic products have become so cheap and durable that not even the forces of nature seem able to stop them. A soupy expanse of plastic waste — too tough for bacteria to break down — now covers an estimated 1 million square miles of the Pacific Ocean.

Sensing a hazard, researchers started hunting for a substitute for plastic's main ingredient, petroleum. They wanted something renewable, biodegradable, and abundant enough to be inexpensive."

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Self-Assembling Optics

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "A group of researchers led by Peidong Yang, a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, have recently created nanoscale particles that can self-assemble into various optical devices. These include photonic crystals, metamaterials, color changing paints, components for optical computers and ultrasensitive chemical sensors, among many other potential applications. The new technology works by controlling how densely the tiny silver particles assemble themselves."
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ATI RV740 - A 40nm RV770 In Disguise

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "RV740 is often misunderstood as the successor to RV730 which in fact is far from it. RV740 is expected to take the market by storm by Q2 next year as the best value/performance chip from AMD. It is AMD's first 40nm GPG chip with all IP being re-designed and characterized for 40nm."
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If Gamers Ran The World

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "I don't think it can have escaped anyone's attentions that there was a reasonably significant election in America recently. And they got me thinking.

Barack Obama is 47. By contrast, David Cameron — who leaps to mind as another potential national leader in the coming years, whatever you may think of that fact — is 42. I got to thinking about what a national leader might look like in ten years time, 2018. Let's suggest, based on Obama and Cameron, that they're 45.

They're 45 in 2018 when they stand for office — that means they were born in 1973. They would have been four when Taito released Space Invaders came out; seven when Pac Man came out. In 1985, when they were 12, Nintendo would launch the NES in the west. At 18, just as they would have been heading to University, the first NHL game came out for the Genesis/Megadrive and might consumed many a night in the dorm. At 22, the Playstation was launched. At 26, they could have bought a PS2 at launch; at 31, they might have taken up World of Warcraft with their friends.

They would have been a gamer all their lives. Not someone who once played videogames, trotting out the same anecdote about "playing Asteroids once" in interviews; someone for whom games were another part of their lives, a primary, important medium. Someone who understood games.

And if that was the case, what might they have learned?"

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Nokia Calling All Innovators

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "Nokia, and Segway's inventor, Dean Kamen, recently announced a competition which invites innovators to submit new applications for mobile communications that can improve the world. The prize, $25,000, will be given in three different categories: eco-challenge, emerging markets, and technology showcase, along the guaranteed fame that tends to be attached to the "saving the world" title."
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Special GUI for Your Eyes Only

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "Researches at the University of Washington have recently developed a system, which for the first time, offers an instantly customizable approach to user interfaces. Each participant in the program is placed through a brief skills test and then a mathematically-based version of the user interface optimized for his or her vision and motor abilities is generated. The current off-the-shelf designs are especially discouraging for the disabled, the elderly and others who have trouble controlling a mouse, because most computer programs have standardized button sizes, fonts, and layouts, which are designed for normal users."
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Bored at work? Read this.

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  about 6 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "Nicole Haase would like to work harder than she does. But as a receptionist and payroll administrator for a manufacturing firm in Milwaukee, she finds limited opportunities to take on more duties.

"Work is slow, and we're a small company, so it's not always easy to find other things to do," Ms. Haase says. To fill empty moments, she e-mails friends and works on freelance writing assignments. "The Internet is my friend — anything to make the time pass," she says, adding that the strain of having too little to do creates its own kind of burnout."

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Plastic Logic E-Newspaper

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  about 6 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "Plastic Logic, a spin-off company from the Cambridge University's Cavendish Laboratory, has recently released its design of a future electronic newspaper reader. This lightweight plastic screen copies the appearance, but not the feel, of a printed newspaper. This electronic paper technology was pioneered by the E-Ink Corporation and is used in the current generation Sony eReader and Amazon.com's Kindle. Plastic Logic's device, yet to be named, has a highly legible black-and-white display and a screen more than twice as large compared to current versions available on the market."
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Valve Tried to Trick Half Life 2 Hacker Into Fake

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  about 6 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "After the secret source code for its then-unreleased shooter Half Life 2 showed up on BitTorrent in 2003, gamemaker Valve Software cooked up an elaborate ruse with the FBI targeting the German hacker suspected in the leak, even setting up a fake job interview in an effort to lure him to the United States for arrest."
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The Best Fictional Doomsday Devices

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  about 6 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "America's love affair with the doomsday device is a turbulent one. First popularized in comic books and James Bond movies, then lampooned by Austin Powers, we love them because their ridiculousness makes us feel safe — like the exhilarating false danger of a roller coaster. Wired looks at eight of the best fictional devices."
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First Trek film footage unveiled

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  about 6 years ago

Ostracus (1354233) writes "Lost creator JJ Abrams has unveiled footage from his Star Trek prequel at a press event in London. The clips featured US actor Chris Pine as the young Captain Kirk, Heroes star Zachary Quinto as Mr Spock and Simon Pegg as Enterprise engineer Scotty. The audience also saw Leonard Nimoy reprise his role as the older Mr Spock in one of four excerpts from the film. In his introduction, Abrams said he wanted the film, to be released in May 2009, to feel "legitimate and real". Speaking at London's Vue West End cinema on Tuesday morning, the film-maker admitted he had "never really been a huge Star Trek fan"."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Some kind of awesome.

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 2 years ago

For 2012 I have two routers, a cloud NAS, and three ATAs running various software in which I have to bring together in some kind of awesome. This should be interesting.

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PopUrl

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 5 years ago Well let's see if anyone reads these things. Basically Popurl is a meta-site that aggregates all those consensus filter sites .e.g. Slashdot for one. Here's the url.

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Camera

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Well managed to order a Panasonic DMC-LX3. What a pain that was. From lots of reading both manuals and reviews. To finding a decent price from a reputable company. BTW stay away from Prestige Camera based in NY. Classic Bait and Switch. Website says nothing about the camera offered being the import model. The US model was about a $100 more. And a 2 GB card was about $39.00. After an "issue" with my card I canceled and went with an outfit based in Washington state. Paid more but what you see is what you got and paid plus the sales person was pleasant and the even shipped it out that day late as it was (for me). I even got an 8GB card for about the same that a 2 GB would have run. I'll post later about the camera itself.

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In the beginning...

Ostracus Ostracus writes  |  more than 6 years ago

There were blank journals and he saw this wasn't so good. So he created man to fill those journals. And man filled those journals but soon realized he was bored writing for himself. So then God created the comment and said let others fill this space. So others soon came and filled the journals with comments and he saw this was all good.

Heh, sure beats an "It was a dark and stormy night" as an opener. Anyway lets make this space productive. One I like Trance and Dance. I also have two questions for the community. I have TWC (Time Warner Cable) and like most they have digital phone. What are people's experiences with it and how does it compare to the alternatives? Also a bit more general and a nice "Ask Slashdot". Can anyone come up with examples of things that wouldn't exist without broadband internet? Not internet. Broadband internet.

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