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Comments

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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

Overzeetop Is 10,000 your personal peak, perhaps? (181 comments)

Perhaps 10,000 hours is what it takes to reach your personal level of mastery. The average or the genius - once you've put in your 10,000 (or 6000 or 14,000; 10,000 is only one significant digit), you've essentially gotten as good as you will every get, down to some number far to the right of the decimal.

yesterday
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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

Overzeetop Dungeons and Dragons got it right (181 comments)

10,000 hours isn't some magical perfect answer to every one of life's skill and talent questions. It's a round number - notice that there's only a single significant digit. And "mastery" really changed depending on your subject. But more importantly, you're parent rolled 3d6 for all 6 of your attributes and, god damnit, if you got a 5 for intelligence you are never going to be a fucking magic user no matter how many hours you study. Hell, you could have rolled an 18, but you're still going to need to get some experience if you really want to cast a delayed blast fireball.

10,000 hours is about 5 years of working at something - diligently - full time. Your profession, your reason for being, your everything. Yes, somebody is going to be better than you and beat you to it with less time. There are 7 billion people in the world, the chances of finding somebody with more innate talent is pretty damned high. And, hey - no matter how long you practice, the chances of you becoming a master in something for which you have no aptitude or - worse - missing some serious prerequisites is going to be very low. But take the average person with average aptitude and give him or her 10,000 hours to practice or train with the goal of becoming proficient in a chosen field, and they're going to learn enough to be considered a "master". Not the best in the world, probably not the second or third best, or whatever you want to call the absolute cream, but you will have mastered it.

And, lets face it, even after 10,000 hours you're still not going to be able to cast a Wish spell and get what you want, but you can sure as hell go on a quest with me 'cause after 10,000 hours you're going to be one bad ass magic user. Or dragon poo. (which I understand goes for a fair sum to the right NPC)

 

yesterday
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World's Smallest 3G Module Will Connect Everything To the Internet

Overzeetop Re: Why? (117 comments)

If you're a distance runner, especially one who runs off-road, having a way to contact someone in case of injury is a big deal. It may not be a matter of life and death, but it could be a matter of a more serious injury. Twisting an ankle may result in a week or two off running; twisting an ankle and then having to walk on it for several miles to get back to a place to call for/get help can mean months of (very expensive) rehab. Think of it as insurance - a $100 of service covers him for several years against a potential $20,000 medical bill and months of lost time.enjoyment.

2 days ago
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Why India's Mars Probe Was So Cheap

Overzeetop Re:NASA in Vegas (200 comments)

For the shuttle program, 2% failure rate was a major embarrassment and resulted on major, worldwide news stories and grounding of the fleet for years at a time.

When that's framing your risk tolerance, there's going to be a lot more care (and money) involved.

5 days ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Overzeetop Re:Wow (903 comments)

"Lenders must be made whole, even though they are charging a higher rate on these loans due to the added risk they are supposedly taking on"

Seriously, do you think lawyers, eviction/repossession proceedings are free or 100% guaranteed? That's where that extra money goes. That's not to say that there aren't unscrupulous lenders in the market, but if it were you lending the money, you'd be pretty disturbed if someone stiffed you for it and you went hungry as a result.

5 days ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Overzeetop Re:These people are doing it to themselves (903 comments)

Ambulances don't make you pay up front. All medical fees are negotiable on the back side. Otherwise they'd require a deposit, retainer, or bond before a doctor looked at you.

5 days ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Overzeetop Re:This is evil (903 comments)

Maybe why usury was forbidden in the bible?

5 days ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Overzeetop Re:These people are doing it to themselves (903 comments)

"Being days past the "due date" does not make you late."
Well, paying before the due date makes you "on time," so for the common definition of late, they'd be late.

"Being 1 billing cycle past the due date makes you late, in most states, and under Federal lending laws."
citation? I suspect there's a different term

5 days ago
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Users Report Warping of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus

Overzeetop Re:Typical Engineering mistake (421 comments)

Actually, it is a problem with engineering. The design parameters haven't changed (pocketable device), the designers have simply decided to ignore that constraint because it doesn't work with their aesthetic.

And belt-mounted pouch...I'm nearly speechless. I gave up belt holsters when I retired my pocket protector and horn rims.

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Keep Students' Passwords Secure?

Overzeetop Re:Lastpass (191 comments)

You don't deal with school systems much, I see. In most places this isn't a simple request. And have you ever used Lastpass on an original iOS device (original iPads cannot update past iOS 5.1.1)? Convenient isn't the word I would use.

Besides, what happens if the 7 year old forgets his or her master password? If he has it in his notebook, the teacher can help him. If not, she will spend the next hour setting up and approving all of his logins on all of the sites they use. And 7 year olds forget things like passwords. A lot.

5 days ago
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IBM Solar Concentrator Can Produce12kW/day, Clean Water, and AC

Overzeetop Re: Desalinisation (268 comments)

And that's why I should always read the article. They are running at 1500C (though how they're achieving theoretical carnot efficiency is a mystery). They also spelled adsorption wrong. *sigh*

about a week ago
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IBM Solar Concentrator Can Produce12kW/day, Clean Water, and AC

Overzeetop The sickness of science and reality (268 comments)

Hey, I love solar power. Of all the "green" ways to produce energy, it's my favorite because it is direct from the source and generally produces the lowest byproduct problems.

However, the GP is correct - the article is so fraught with errors that anyone with any scientific knowledge assumes the project management to be either utterly incompetent or, more likely, dealing in absolute fraud. Anyone who has passed basic science classes knows that if your units come out wrong when you do math, it means your answer is guaranteed to be wrong. If you do a problem which requires that your answer be in units of volume, and you come out with length to the ninth power, you've made an error. If you need power (kwh) and you come up with energy (kw) you've missed a term (or several). Any time the units for a project are incorrect, you invalidate your arguments.

Now, there are better articles on this - no doubt. But defending this makes you look like the legion of people who funded that LED roadway indegogo project. It's not that it isn't cool, but if you assumed they got the efficiency they wanted and it worked perfectly and ran their own numbers, you find out that to make their ultimate goal work would cost something like 250 Trillion dollars. But, hey, a pretty picture and an promise is all we need, right?

about a week ago
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IBM Solar Concentrator Can Produce12kW/day, Clean Water, and AC

Overzeetop Re: Desalinisation (268 comments)

"80% efficiency number may come in part from factoring in the reclamation of said waste heat"

I would say that would be absolutely necessary, given that the most perfectly efficient process possible with a room temperature heat sink would require that the active portion of the generator be running at 1500C (Carnot efficiency = 80% with a sink at 25C)

It is nice that they spelled adsorption correctly, given that practically every other technical part of the article gets the units so wrong they're scientifically impossible.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Keep Students' Passwords Secure?

Overzeetop Physical notebooks are perfect for this age (191 comments)

Notebooks are non-installable (no e-viruses), portable, inexpensive, and do not require access to a third party online service (school access whitelists work).

They are as secure as they need to be - students are to use their own notebooks and note share them, and as long as a notebook is closed it is secure from prying eyes. These aren't nuclear codes, they're access to textbook sites used by grade school kids. If you're so concerned, have your child get a small, pocket sized notebook and write them down there, and remind him or her that they should keep it with them at all times and bring it home every night and back to school each morning.

PS - The admonition not to share passwords is a good way to train kids that security information should not be shared, even though it's not really a critical safety concern at this point.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: How To Keep Students' Passwords Secure?

Overzeetop LastPass, 1Password, KeePass....all impossible (191 comments)

It's school; all the computers are locked down and limited in access only to approved sites (whitelist). No outside software may be installed, and all USB ports are frozen. No personal electronics are allowed to be brought in by kids.

Remind me again how LastPass, 1Password, and KeePass work in these environments?

about a week ago
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BlackBerry Launches Square-Screened Passport Phone

Overzeetop Re:Awful awful timing of launch (189 comments)

You do realize that stainless (in it's most common forms) is no stronger than typical structural aluminums, right?

about a week ago
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Users Report Warping of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus

Overzeetop Re:So what? (421 comments)

LG G3; front pocket 4-12 hours a day and she's absolutely pristine. Maybe if Apple hadn't made the 6 so fucking long, or weakened the case with side buttons, or insisted on a (fairly) rigid material with poor toughness this wound't be an issue. But it's damned pretty when it's all fresh and new!

  (I'd argue cyclic loading/fatigue, since Aluminum is *very* poor in such conditions, but nobody has had a 6 long enough to induce a fatigue crack).

about a week ago
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Users Report Warping of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus

Overzeetop The ultimate irony - hipsters with holsters (421 comments)

The return of the phone holster will be next years hot accessory. The iPhone 4 made bumpers cool, now they're going to bring back the day of the belt-mounted phone clip.

Please excuse me while I go throw up.

about a week ago
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Users Report Warping of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus

Overzeetop Re:is that an iPhone in your pocket? (421 comments)

Even more interestingly, the Samsung didn't permanently bend, but the flex of the case allowed damage to the screen. The Sony failures occurred in BACK pockets. The sole Blackberry bend occurred from "unknown causes" - which could have been anything the owner doesn't want to admit, not just a front-pocket failure.

about a week ago
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Users Report Warping of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus

Overzeetop Re:Don't worry (421 comments)

It's mostly aluminum with very little ferrous metals. The most that will do is melt the iron parts of the sensors and components.

Better to just set it up on a grating and heat it vigorously from below with an oxy-acetylene torch. It still won't fix it, but it may make a satisfying popping sound from time to time.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Cloud provider Livedrive has critically failed leaving users without access

Overzeetop Overzeetop writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Overzeetop (214511) writes "For three days, Livedrive has been offline, denying access to users files except through their one-file-at-a-time web interface. The support forum, which is limited to registered users only and is submission moderated, has had no posts since late February 23rd, just before the first major service error occurred. Since the service went offline on March 6th, there have been no status updates except to indicate a new date on the status page. Will this service interruption finally kill off the UK-based cloud service provider, which has been losing £1,000,000 a year?"
Link to Original Source
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Digital versions of popular books to be delayed

Overzeetop Overzeetop writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Overzeetop (214511) writes "Simon and Schuster and Hachette have recently announced that they will delay e-book releases by up to 4 months. This comes on the heels of literary agent recommending such a plan just days prior. This seems like a potential stumbling block for people who are considering picking up an e-reader this holiday season. Will Amazon or Barns and Noble consider playing hardball with the publishers to get the electronic versions released earlier?"
Link to Original Source
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Overzeetop Overzeetop writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Overzeetop (214511) writes "What solutions are there for non-Outlook based calendaring and contact software that can be used on both a Windows desktop and a Windows Mobile device? I need shared contacts and calendaring with others in my small office, and would like to take that "on the road" with my new (yet to be purchased) pda/phone. I really don't want to go to Exchange server. Is there something that will work on both the desktop and a mobile device that doesn't use the Outlook database?"

Journals

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Overzeetop Overzeetop writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Many people mistake my sig to mean that I'm suprised that so many people (half!?!) are of sub-average intellegence. Quite the contrary, there are plenty of people out there who are intellegent.

My problem is that there are so many people who choose not to exercise their intelligence in any useful fashion. No, I'm not talking about proofreading emails or journal entries. I mean just plain old, walking around common sense.

You hear somthing incredible on the radio, or from a friend, or (the worst) read it in an email. Rather than saying, "that sounds pretty unusual, I should check it out for myself," it gets repeated to eveyone you know as if it were handed to you on stone tablets you received at Mount Sinai. Urban legends take the cake (stolen kidneys?). But it applies to current events, too.

Somtimes it's even simpler. When you're driving on a highway and an exit ramp is coming up, most of the time an entrance ramp will immediatly follow. A quick glance will show you if it is a busy interchange. Are you in the right lane? Is there anyone in the next lane over? No? How about switching lanes so you don't play chicken with the cars entering. Stupid AND inconsiderate (they seem to go hand in hand).

It's not about how intellegent people are; that isn't suprising. It's about how many people choose not to use that intellegence; that always amazes me.

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