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Comments

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Apple Developing Curve Screen iPhones and Improved Sensors

PatPending Re:The cost of consonants (243 comments)

Is the possessive apostrophe particularly expensive these days?

"...told Bloomberg that Apple next iPhone models will come with..." and "...would be Apple largest iPhones."

Why not "Apple's next iPhone" and "Apple's largest iPhones?" Because as girlintraining posted elsewhere,

"Dice doesn't have dedicated slashdot editors anymore. They are editors of a dozen or so sites. Really now, what kind of quality do you expect now that they've sold out and now monetize the web synergies to create a new market paradigm of customer-focused informational advertisements?"

about 9 months ago
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India To Launch Mars Orbiter "Mangalyaan" Tuesday

PatPending Re:Will they... (109 comments)

Will they be building the first Martian call center?

Judging by the time I spend on-hold with their phone support, one would think the call is being routed via Mars!

about 9 months ago
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Japanese Researchers Build Rock-paper-scissors Robot That Wins 100% of the Time

PatPending Re:Story not a dup (114 comments)

Oh, c'mon! You're pulling my leg, right?

about 9 months ago
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Japanese Researchers Build Rock-paper-scissors Robot That Wins 100% of the Time

PatPending Re:Posted by Soulskill on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @1 (114 comments)

We'll have to wait until the robot that detects duplicate posts about duplicate stories is completed.

about 9 months ago
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Japanese Researchers Build Rock-paper-scissors Robot That Wins 100% of the Time

PatPending Once again... (114 comments)

Since Rock-Paper-Scissors dates back to the time of the Chinese Han Dynasty, the Japanese built this in order to diplomatically resolve the dispute with China over the Senkaku Islands.

Actually: in Japan, there's a "strip-poker" variant of rock-paper-scissors. The loser of each round removes an article of clothing. The game is a minor part of porn culture in Japan.

Once again, porn drives innovation!

about 9 months ago
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How Elon Musk Approaches IT At Tesla

PatPending Up in flames? (231 comments)

I wonder if this Telsa product will go up in flames?

about 9 months ago
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New Film Renders Screen Reflection Almost Non-Existent

PatPending Re:SONY "do not patronize" (112 comments)

Or Sony could moth-ball it.

more than 2 years ago
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New Film Renders Screen Reflection Almost Non-Existent

PatPending One major hurdle to overcome prior to production (112 comments)

Before Sony can commercially produce this, they have to overcome one hurdle: how to stop a device with this coating from gravitating to bright lights!

more than 2 years ago
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New Film Renders Screen Reflection Almost Non-Existent

PatPending Re:Moth-eye (112 comments)

I'll see your Wikipedia reference and raise you two USPTO patents granted to SONY for this:

8,027,090 and 7,633,045.

Note: according to another of SONY's patents, moth-eye can also be used to record info on optical media:

"Today, there are seven primary methods by which information can be recorded on optical media. All methods heat the recording layer to a certain temperature. The methods are known as ablative, alloying, bubble-forming, moth-eye, phase-change, dye/polymer and magneto-optic which cause or could cause some mechanical deformation of the substrate."

P.S.

Unlike TFA these patents include detailed drawings and SEM photographs.

P.S.S.

I remember when the authors of tech articles did this kind of background research. Sigh.

more than 2 years ago
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Rare Operating Apple 1 Rakes In $374,500 At Sotheby's Auction

PatPending Re:Well... (118 comments)

Assuming a 4% rate of inflation, in 35 years a new Apple computer will cost about $11,045.

more than 2 years ago
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Rare Operating Apple 1 Rakes In $374,500 At Sotheby's Auction

PatPending Re:Well... (118 comments)

$666.66 in 1976 had the same buying power as $2,710.75 in 2012.

Now, as then, that'll buy you Apple's latest and greatest computer.

(Actually it's $2,799.00 but still remarkably close given this span of 36 years!)

more than 2 years ago
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Adobe Releases Sandboxed Flash Player For Firefox

PatPending Note: not for XP (104 comments)

From Adobe's news release:

[Emphasis added]

The restrictions we apply to this sandboxed process come from the Windows OS. Windows Vista and Windows 7 provide the tools necessary to properly sandbox a process. For the Adobe Reader and Acrobat sandbox implementation introduced in 2010, Adobe spent significant engineering effort trying to approximate those same controls on Windows XP. Today, with Windows 8 just around the corner and Windows XP usage rapidly decreasing, it did not make sense for the Flash Player team to make that same engineering investment for Windows XP. Therefore, we've focused on making Protected Mode for Firefox available on Windows Vista and later.

more than 2 years ago
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Of currently dead inventors, my favorite is ...

PatPending Re:Al Gore, of course (542 comments)

He also invented Algorithms.

more than 2 years ago
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Pix of my girlfriend's boobs will land me, master hacktivist, in jail? EXIF!

PatPending BOY BUSTED BY BUSTY BABE'S BOOBIES! (3 comments)

Boy busted by busty babe's boobies! Film at 11.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Google: Gmail users have no expectation of privacy

PatPending PatPending writes  |  about a year ago

PatPending (953482) writes "FTFA: Google has made it clear that people who send or receive email via Gmail should not expect their messages to remain private.

In a 39-page motion filed in June to have a class-action data-mining lawsuit dismissed, the Web giant cites Smith v. Maryland, a 1979 Supreme Court decision that upheld the collection of electronic communications without a warrant.

"Just as a sender of a letter to a business colleague cannot be surprised that the recipient's assistant opens the letter, people who use web-based email today cannot be surprised if their emails are processed by the recipient's [email provider] in the course of delivery. Indeed, 'a person has no legitimate expectation of privacy in information he voluntarily turns over to third parties.'""

Link to Original Source
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Shields for Privacy in a Smartphone World

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "Anytime, anywhere: co-workers, strangers, and others are using their smart phones to secretly take your photograph, record your conversations, and record videos to potentially be used against you. What can one do to protect one's right to privacy in the face of technology? (Aside from never leaving your mom's basement.)"
Link to Original Source
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How repurposed military tracking technology is remaking the NBA

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "FTA:

The technology was originally developed to track missiles. Now, SportVU systems hang from the catwalks of 10 NBA arenas, tiny webcams that silently track each player as they shoot, pass, and run across the court, recording each and every move.

Their system captures the X/Y coordinates of all the players and refs--along with the X/Y/Z (3-D) coordinates of the ball--25 times every second (or 72,000 times a game). Algorithms take into account all sorts of variables to keep the system accurate, from the lines on the court to the reflections of flashing billboards. Another layer of software at a central server puts this raw data together into something meaningful. Information as specific as player ball touches and dribbles can be calculated within 60 seconds of being spotted by SportVU cams. Stats can generate these values in simple, automated reports.

On one hand, deeper data seems inevitable--and no one is disagreeing that SportVU has incredible potential with deep data--on the other, with no teams all that interested in sharing how they’re potentially innovating with that data, it’s making his job no easier. “I know for a fact some of those teams are using it quite a bit. They don’t tell me exactly what they’re doing with it. Some teams are fairly open and they ask for our help. Others are very secretive,” Kopp says. “Because, for a while, it is all about how you’re using it. Once they figure out something they think is meaningful, they don’t want anyone to get a whiff of it.”"

Link to Original Source
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Hacked companies fight back with controversial steps

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "FTA:

Frustrated by their inability to stop sophisticated hacking attacks or use the law to punish their assailants, an increasing number of U.S. companies are taking retaliatory action.

Known in the cyber security industry as "active defense" or "strike-back" technology, the reprisals range from modest steps to distract and delay a hacker to more controversial measures. Security experts say they even know of some cases where companies have taken action that could violate laws in the United States or other countries, such as hiring contractors to hack the assailant's own systems.

Other security experts say a more aggressive posture is unlikely to have a significant impact in the near term in the overall fight against cybercriminals and Internet espionage. Veteran government and private officials warn that much of the activity is too risky to make sense, citing the chances for escalation and collateral damage."

Link to Original Source
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Google accused of invading privacy with pictures of house numbers

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "FTA: "Internet users are being asked to read random property numbers snapped by Google's Street View cameras, as part of new security checks.

The tests weed out "bots" by ensuring that users are human. But Google has been accused of exploiting the data submitted in by the public for commercial gain — by adding the information to its own mapping system.

Campaign groups said that the use of pictures of real house numbers presents “serious” security issues, and accused the internet company of being “underhand and crude”.""

Link to Original Source
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Adobe's latest critical security update pushes scareware

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "Summary: Adobe just released a critical Flash Player security update. Good news: it includes a new automatic updater for Windows. Bad news: Adobe’s download page pushes a misleading “system optimizer” designed to scare users into paying for unneeded repairs.

A video of the entire process (approximately 10 minutes) is here.

This year alone, three Flash Player security updates have been issued by Adobe: one on February 15, one on March 5, and one on March 28."

Link to Original Source
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Judge: BitTorrent Downloads Are Protected Anonymous Speech

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "Oh, no: please disregard my prior submission due to this UPDATE: "Update: Shortly after this article was published we learned that the order in question has been vacated.

It turns out that the order was drafted by a defense attorney and Judge Schumacher apparently signed it by mistake, assuming all parties agreed on it. This is bad news for the defendants and means that the mass-BitTorrent lawsuits in Florida state courts are very much alive for now.""

Link to Original Source
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Judge: BitTorrent Downloads Are Protected Anonymous Speech

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "FTA: "Miami Judge Marc Schumacher has issued a landmark order in which he protects accused BitTorrent downloaders from mass-lawsuits filed by copyright holders. One of the main arguments of the judge is that these “fishing expeditions” violate BitTorrent users’ right to anonymous speech, which is protected by the constitution. The order effectively kills all BitTorrent lawsuits in Florida state courts.""
Link to Original Source
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Apple's new iPad can max out your data plan in 10 minutes

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "From the article: "Combine the realities of multimedia file size and a blazing fast connection that allows transfer of said files at unprecedented speeds, and you have a recipe for potentially expensive disaster. One careless download of a 1080p high-definition movie from the iTunes Store over 4G could eat up your entire monthly plan and then some. In fact, if you could achieve download speeds at the theoretical maximum 72Mbps of LTE, you could blow through a 5GB plan in just under 10 minutes, and Verizon's largest 10GB tier in about 20. Real-world speeds of course are actually going to be somewhat lower, but we're still talking about the potential to obliterate your entire expensive monthly data plan in much less than a single day.""
Link to Original Source
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Anonymous, Decentralized and Uncensored File-Sharing is Booming

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "FTA: "The RetroShare network allows people to create a private and encrypted file-sharing network. Users add friends by exchanging PGP certificates with people they trust. All the communication is encrypted using OpenSSL and files that are downloaded from strangers always go through a trusted friend.

In other words, it’s a true Darknet and virtually impossible to monitor by outsiders.

RetroShare founder DrBob told us that while the software has been around since 2006, all of a sudden there’s been a surge in downloads. “The interest in RetroShare has massively shot up over the last two months,” he said.""

Link to Original Source
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Google in EU showdown over privacy rules

PatPending PatPending writes  |  about 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "From the "here we go again department:" Google has found itself on a collision course with European regulators after a provisional finding that its new privacy policy breaches European law.

Despite a fresh request from regulators to postpone the March 1 adoption of the new policy, the US search company gave no sign of backing down on Tuesday and reiterated its defense of its new approach to handling user data."

Link to Original Source
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Smithsonian Aims to Make All Objects In Museum Collection 3-D-Printable

PatPending PatPending writes  |  about 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "A new effort under way at the world's largest museum and research institution could eventually mean more of its 137 million objects will be publicly available, even if just via 3D digital models. The only problem? They need more companies that, like RedEye On Demand, have the resources to help bring the efforts to fruition."
Link to Original Source
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Google offers $1 million reward to hackers who exploit Chrome

PatPending PatPending writes  |  about 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "This year at the CanSecWest security conference, Google will once again sponsor rewards for Google Chrome exploits. This complements and extends their Chromium Security Rewards program by recognizing that developing a fully functional exploit is significantly more work than finding and reporting a potential security bug."
Link to Original Source
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Google to Sell Heads-Up Display Glasses by Year's End

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "The Google X offices are working on a wearable computing device that is Android-based and will include a display positioned a few inches from the wearer's eyes. It will include 3G or 4G connection, motion sensor, GPS, and a relatively low-resolution camera.

"According to several Google employees familiar with the project who asked not to be named, the glasses will go on sale to the public by the end of the year. These people said they are expected “to cost around the price of current smartphones,” or $250 to $600.""

Link to Original Source
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Smartphone Shipments Surpass PCs

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "Manufacturers of smart phones shipped more devices than manufacturers of personal computers (sans tablet PCs) in the fourth quarter of 2010, according to research, making mobile devices as the computing platform of choice earlier than many industry-watchers had expected.

The growth in smart phones will continue to surge, analysts said, as the high-end models improve and the middle tier gets more affordable."

Link to Original Source
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Hackers Penetrate Nasdaq Computers

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "From the article:

Hackers have repeatedly penetrated the computer network of the company that runs the Nasdaq Stock Market during the past year, and federal investigators are trying to identify the perpetrators and their purpose, according to people familiar with the matter.

The exchange's trading platform—the part of the system that executes trades—wasn't compromised, these people said. However, it couldn't be determined which other parts of Nasdaq's computer network were accessed.

Investigators are considering a range of possible motives, including unlawful financial gain, theft of trade secrets and a national-security threat designed to damage the exchange.

"

Link to Original Source
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Domestic use of aerial drones by law enforcement

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "In a prior Slashdot story, Honeywell To Sell Miami-Dade Police a Surveillance Drone, and this summary of Drones on The Home Front, drones are now used by the Texas Department of Public Safety; the Mesa County Sheriff's Office, Colorado; the Miami-Dade County, Florida, Police Department; and the Department of Homeland Security. But what about privacy concerns? "Drones raise the prospect of much more pervasive surveillance," said Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union's Speech, Privacy and Technology Project. "We are not against them, absolutely. They can be a valuable tool in certain kinds of operations. But what we don't want to see is their pervasive use to watch over the American people.""
Link to Original Source
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German firm develops Internet eraser for photos

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "German firm X-pire is poised to launch software the third week of this month allowing users to have photos uploaded to websites erased automatically after a certain time, said Michael Backes, founder of X-pire. The software will cost two euros per month.

Their software assigns an electronic key to each photo; the key is valid for a limited time period. Thereafter the web server checks whether the photo has expired and blocks it from being displayed if its time is up.

Internet surfers already have the power to delete photos from social networking websites like Facebook, but "experience shows that they don't get round to it," Backes said. "Most Facebook users, for example, are passive users. They go on, they put on a lot of private information and almost never come back on or they forget their password," he said.

"The software is not designed for people who understand how to protect their data but rather for the huge mass of people who want to solve the problem at its core and not to have to think about it any more," added Backes.

However, it will not protect cautious users against third parties downloading their pictures and saving them. "When people put photos on line, it's so they can be seen... our software is not a panacea, not absolute protection," he said."

Link to Original Source
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Using LED ceiling lights for digital communication

PatPending PatPending writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PatPending (953482) writes "A Minnesota start-up company, LVX, is developing products under several patents and about a dozen pending applications, e.g., "Building illumination apparatus with integrated communications, security and energy management", that puts clusters of LEDs in a standard-sized ceiling light fixture. The LEDs are in optical communication with special modems attached to office computers. The first generation of the LVX system will transmit data at speeds of about three megabits per second, roughly as fast as a residential DSL line. LVX Chief Executive Officer John Pederson said a second-generation system that will roll out in about a year will permit speeds on par with commercial Wi-Fi networks. It will also permit lights that can be programmed to change intensity and color. Pederson said the next generation of the system should get even more efficient as fixtures become "smart" so the lights would dim when bright sunlight is coming through a window or when a conference room or hallway is empty. Hurdles: speed and installation costs. No word on the reliability and security of this system."
Link to Original Source

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