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Comments

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Back To Faxes: Doctors Can't Exchange Digital Medical Records

Penguinisto Re:Like SAS etc (222 comments)

A lot of these vendors are locked into their own technologies.

I had interviewed at Epic once (didn't feel like moving to Wisconsin... sorry) and realized that they used M for most of what they did... not much interconnectivity there.

yesterday
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Aral Sea Basin Almost Completely Dry

Penguinisto Re:what, no man made global warming? (139 comments)

If you think about it, The Great Salt Lake is staring at the same issue (albeit on a longer timescale).

yesterday
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Aral Sea Basin Almost Completely Dry

Penguinisto Re:So it is not? (139 comments)

The old Soviet Union did enough ecological damage without having to hang that subject on it...

yesterday
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Aral Sea Basin Almost Completely Dry

Penguinisto Re:The water wars are coming (139 comments)

I don't think this particular story is a harbinger of that. Rather, I think it's a story of monumental stupidity caused by a totalitarian government that didn't bother looking forward, and was too eager by half to waggle their technological penises in front of the world.

The rivers feeding the Aral Sea haven't dried up - just that most of it got diverted to other uses, and the Aral Sea was the unfortunate loser in that bargain.

I don't disagree that yeah, potable water is going to eventually be a problem as climate slowly shifts and population grows. The climate and population growth are debatable and mostly unknown as to rate, direction and cause, but change they will.

yesterday
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Adobe Photoshop Is Coming To Linux, Through Chromebooks

Penguinisto Re:How important is that at this point? (192 comments)

Really, you think professional 3d modelers don't know what a vertex is? Really?

They have an idea as to what it might be ('a mathematical point in cartesian space' would be the description given if you're lucky), but, say, how it behaves under subdivision and which SubD algorithm produces the best results for a given use case is another story entirely. That's why I put the word "really" in the sentence you took your question off of.

Let me give a more concrete example: Raytracing. Sure, they'll know how it would (mostly) behave in their given suite (depending on which render engine(s) they send it to regularly), but knowing how light (and more importantly, shadows and occlusions thereof) behaves, so as to produce a better result, especially when shooting for realism? A pro photographer likely has a better idea of how light works than most of the schlubs who push mesh around. ;) Put it this way - I can count a very small percentage of folks who have done a good enough job of it to fool all but the most experienced eye.

yesterday
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Adobe Photoshop Is Coming To Linux, Through Chromebooks

Penguinisto Re:Nice, but... (192 comments)

Why don't you do it?

Because it would involve asking DAZ or Smith Micro for the respective proprietary source codes first, then getting permission to release the results. Both applications are currently ongoing products (DS is at 4.6 now, and Poser at "Poser Pro 2013" last I checked.)

DAZ Studio is doable - I used to work for them as a dev back when 1.0 was released, and they IIRC still use C++ and Qt. Could likely pull it off the OSX branch with only a little effort.

Poser is not so doable; they use a wide variety of weird crap on top of C, including Adobe AIR and the nightmare libs spawned by Kai Krause if I remember right. Not even sure if Linux would accept half of it without a complete rewrite.

All that said, I don't really need to bother - both run just fine on OSX 10.9. I want to see them on Linux mostly for ideological reasons these days.

2 days ago
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Adobe Photoshop Is Coming To Linux, Through Chromebooks

Penguinisto Re:How important is that at this point? (192 comments)

This, right here... and it ain't just Photoshop, either.

In the CG realm, you have people who learned "3DS Max", or "Poser", or "Modo", but few of them could tell you what a vertex really is, let alone half-edges, collision-detection, subdivision, and etc. A few folks do go out of their way to learn the fundamentals (which makes switching between tools less painful), but they're a distinct minority.

Part of the reason why you see so much of this is because every software house has their own oddball idea of what a user interface should do, and even how to approach a given task (NURBS modeling versus mesh extrusion for instance). It would positively scare you to learn one suite (say, 3DS Max) then get sat in front of another (e.g. Modo). The learning curve on each of them is astoundingly steep... Poser's ancient Kai Krause inspired interface, Blender's 48-mouse-button-inspired UI, Wings' (probably) EMACS-inspired sparse-as-hell interface... DAZ Studio's Qt-anchored one... they all approach most of the same things rather differently. It takes a lot of time to get comfortable with a given user interface, before you even take into consideration the behaviors and quirks.

Photoshop is no different in this regard, and that's why most folks who use it know Photoshop, but few of those users know the principles and concepts behind it.

2 days ago
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Adobe Photoshop Is Coming To Linux, Through Chromebooks

Penguinisto Nice, but... (192 comments)

...I went with GIMP years ago. I was able to use many of P-Shop's brushes and actions as-is, and I learned GIMP's actions and interface.

Mind you, I'm not a graphics pro by any means (though I am a heavy hobbyist in CG graphics, and GIMP is invaluable to me for postwork and touch-ups.) Even when I moved to using a Mac for most of my farting-around, the first thing I went for was GIMP for OSX. Just as most actual professionals stick with Photoshop (in spite of the brain-dead subscription model they have these days) because they learned on it, I do the same thing with GIMP... and it works just fine for me.

Now in the professional realm, PShop makes sense to have a Linux port. Strange thing though - a huge percentage of professional CG work is done in Linux nowadays, and has been for awhile, so I'm surprised that it's taken them this long to get around to it.

(now if only the hobbyist CG software shops (I'm looking at *you* Poser and DAZ|Studio!) would get off their asses and make a Linux port...

2 days ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

Penguinisto Re: Apples and Oranges (420 comments)

GP is speaking of global marketshare, not US. IIRC, Apple has a far higher marketshare in the US (not sure offhand what it is, but I think it's like 40% or so.)

2 days ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

Penguinisto Re:good (420 comments)

Just note that the evil(tm) will be compounded by the crapware that some OEMs *and* carriers tend to slather onto the phones, on top of what Google is going to require.

At this rate, I hope that every new Android smartphone comes with at least 8GB of onboard storage... I say this as someone who tends to buy phones on the low-end (my little Huawei has maybe 512MB of internal storage + the 32GB micro-SD card that I cannot move the as-built apps onto...)

2 days ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Penguinisto Re:Oh good (904 comments)

This is all well and good if you live in a city where one can rent a place with a shade-tree to practice your shade-tree mechanics, but many of us (like most of the of the country) live in areas with high populations and even less parking.

In that case, take public transit until you can save up and afford a more reliable car...

about a week ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Penguinisto Re:Oh good (904 comments)

You're right in that a good $300 car would be damn tough to find nowadays, but factor in inflation, and $600 still isn't too hard to do in a couple of months for anyone who makes more than minimum wage, and the typical high-interest car loan will usually cost you around $150-200/mo.

Note that I haven't even touched on the required full coverage insurance of a vehicle under loan.

Owning my cars free and clear lets me keep just liability on the older Sunfire, and liability+a few useful additions (e.g. collision, glass) on the Soul. Insurance on both costs me a total of around $100/mo - full coverage on each under loan would likely cost way more...

about a week ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Penguinisto Re:Oh good (904 comments)

They got rid of the "Buck Sgt." rank sometime at the end of 1991; I know this because I was in one of the very last classes @ Nellis AFB in the middle of that year (I was in what used to be the 37th FW up at TTR if that helps you figure out why and how that happened.) I did it with the intention of making a career out of it, but later events changed my mind; so no, that was not a typo.

I was recommended for it about a month after I made SrA.

about a week ago
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Miss a Payment? Your Car Stops Running

Penguinisto Re:Oh good (904 comments)

...and this is why I have never made a car payment since the early 1990's, when I got a car repo'd while I was off serving in Desert Storm (once I pointed out that the bank broke the law by doing the repo, I discovered the costs of bringing the car back across two states --or a lawyer to fight that-- was way out of scope for an E-4 sergeant's budget.) It was then that I resolved to never, ever make payments on a car again... ever.

Since then, I've driven some outright piles of crap throughout the 1990s, but I've always owned my cars free and clear. I save up the money as best I can until I have enough to buy something newer in reasonably decent condition.

This has progressed from $300-400 hoopties, to a 1988 Mustang (in 1999) for $400, to a 1991 Jeep Wrangler (in 2001) for $4500, to a 2003 Pontiac Sunfire (in 2007) for $7200, to a brand-new 2013 Kia Soul for $14,200.

Each time, I saved my pennies and paid cash, which gave me a drastically lower pricetag, and I own the thing up-front. As a bennie, I still have both the Sunfire and the Soul (my wife drives the latter, and the former is still rolling along just fine at 150k miles), and the Soul is fully covered under warranty for the next 8 years. The Jeep finally died for good in 2013 (too much rust decayed the frame), prompting the new Kia. I gained the advantage of being very handy around a vehicle with tools and knowing junkyards very well, though most of that was self-taught over the years from turning outright shit-piles into decent running cars.

Long story short? Yeah it sucks that you can't drive some NewShiny that gathers all the babes, but start small and build up over time. Save, save, save... and always pay cash. You wind up paying less over the long run, the salesman suddenly wants to kiss your ass, and you get a better deal overall.

Oh, and in many of the cases up there, I managed to sell the older cars for more than I paid for them (though nowadays I figure I'll just drive the ones I have until they finally die for good.)

about a week ago
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Microsoft On US Immigration: It's Our Way Or the Canadian Highway

Penguinisto Re:Fine! (363 comments)

Since open source does not pay its developers (in most cases), developers don't get paid whether MS outsources or if open source products are used.

...actually, you'd be amazed at the number of OSS devs who do get paid; many are hired by OSS-based companies (e.g. RedHat), but many more are hired by large tech firms who find it in their interest to do so, such as Intel, IBM, HP, Dell (no, seriously!), and etc. Intel still has a sizable OSS dev group, for instance.

about a week ago
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Microsoft On US Immigration: It's Our Way Or the Canadian Highway

Penguinisto Re:Fine! (363 comments)

Yeah, I can picture the howling of "socialism" from the Tea Party and the Republicans now.

Because to them, if it means corporate profits, it's a good thing.

You may want to get out more, then, because I doubt that you'd find an actual conservative anywhere (who doesn't own a company) that would fit the sterotype you propose. Seriously - I'm very right-leaning in my ideology, but I can tell you right now that I'd love to see corporations get slammed in taxes for off-shoring (and if you actually looked beyond your circle of like-minded friends and pundits, you'd find that I'm not the only one saying it.)

The only difference we have is in justifying the levy, which in your case is faulty, and here's why - I do not *ever* want to have government policy based on anything like the nebulous (and TBH stolen from the Catholic Church) concept of "social justice" in any form.

Instead, I'd much prefer it be based on more objective measures, to wit: If you, as a corporation, move part of your operations overseas, then you proportionally lose your status as a full American corporate 'citizen', and should therefore be subject to tariff in equal proportion. The more jobs you move outside the US, the greater the proportion of a foreign corporation you become, and therefore the greater the tariff you should pay as a portion of your revenue (notice the tax-basis should remain firmly in EBIT, so as to avoid accounting tricks.)

See? No need to appeal to emotion, or to vague (and IMHO dangerous) reasoning like "the real costs". You only need to set and maintain one loophole-free tax rate, tied to a simple metric (percentage of employees of foreign nationality both contracted and on your payroll).

about a week ago
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Seattle Passes Laws To Keep Residents From Wasting Food

Penguinisto Re:Another terrible article courtesy of samzenpus (383 comments)

Same story here as sibling... here in Portland metro, I pay a private company to haul it off. I get three cans: yard waste (compost), recyclables, and garbage.

'course, there have been times when they've left the recycling can sitting un-emptied because they saw a plastic bag in it (no, seriously... isn't that shit supposed to be recyclable)? No big, it's amazing how little I actually do throw away (just me n' the spouse, no kids in the house).

Personally, I cannot wait to move into a completely rural area where I can either compost it or burn it. Saves $40/mo for as little as they have to do at my bit of the street.

about a week ago
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Physicist Claims Black Holes Mathematically Don't Exist

Penguinisto Re:Well of course. (356 comments)

,,,and here I thought it would be struck down because someone would point out that it was somehow funded by an oil company to justify profits... /me ducks and runs like hell

In all seriousness though, It'll be interesting to watch the scientific process at work in proving/disproving what the dude published, since there's no political figures who have staked their careers on the existence/non-existence of black holes. This should make it a fairly clean environment.

(OTOH, I think I heard Stephen Hawking howl in righteous in rage... Disturbance in the Force and all that.)

about a week ago
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Remote Exploit Vulnerability Found In Bash

Penguinisto Re:So now it's the year of the Linux desktop (399 comments)

You do realize that bash is (nowadays) installed in damned near every *nix out there (though I think HPUX is still holding out.)

Hell, even Solaris started chucking it in at around 5.10 (Solaris 10) or so (or was it 9?), and I thought that would take an act of Congress or the Divine to happen.

(get this - you can even get bash for Windows, which might improve that OS by at least a factor of 20).

about a week ago

Submissions

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Some US Hospitals Now Data-Mine Patients' Purchases, Lifestyle

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  about 3 months ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "A new article up on Bloomberg shows that in at least two hospital chains, your doctor can know more about you than you may want them to: "Information compiled by data brokers from public records and credit card transactions can reveal where a person shops, the food they buy, and whether they smoke. The largest hospital chain in the Carolinas is plugging data for 2 million people into algorithms designed to identify high-risk patients, while Pennsylvania’s biggest system uses household and demographic data."

Question is, how soon before your health insurance broker demands/contracts and gets that kind of information, and what privacy can you expect in the future?"
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Want to Prove How Dinosaurs Walked? Pin a Tail on a Chicken

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  about 7 months ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "Researchers have recently gotten a cool idea: If you want to prove how a dinosaur walked, why not test the theory on today's birds? They decided to test things out by putting prosthetic tails on chicks to provide the same balance issues that a T-Rex (and similar bipedal dinosaurs) faced. The prosthetic tails were periodically replaced with larger versions as the chicks grew. The results were astonishing: After 12 weeks, the chickens' legs were measured, and were discovered to have decreased range-of-motion in the knees while their femurs grew longer... just like the T-Rex. You can also see a nifty video of how they did this."
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Ellison's Team Oracle Racing Yacht Capsizes in SF Bay

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  about 2 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "The America's Cup hopeful and Ellison's favorite $8 million racing yacht Team Oracle capsized today underneath the Golden Gate Bridge. (video). They were testing out a new $2 million sailing wing when the boat suddenly "pitch-poled", capsizing immediately. 14 people were aboard, though no one was hurt. The 13,000 lb boat was pulled four miles offshore by currents before it could be recovered. According to the crew, the boat can be salvaged, but the new multimillion-dollar sailing wing was a "total loss" as it broke up in the bay."
Link to Original Source
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Pending Copyright Treaty a Secret?

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "According to CNET, a request for information by Knowledge Ecology International about a pending copyright treaty was denied. Even stranger, the Freedom of Information Act request was denied for "national security" reasons (PDF). While it is not unusual for the White House of any administration to block FOIA requests for national security reasons, One would think that a treaty that affects civil interests alone wouldn't qualify for such secrecy. Not exactly sure what involvement the former RIAA mouthpiece Donald Verelli (a recent Obama pick for the DOJ) may have in this..."
Link to Original Source
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AT&T Is Next To Impose Bandwidth Caps

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "It seems that after Comcast has successfully imposed a 250GB/mo. bandwidth cap on its users, AT&T wants to give it a try, starting in Reno, Nevada. However, they intend to have lower caps, based on your rate plan. For lower-end users (768Kb DSL),this means you only get 20GB/mo. max, while the highest-paying users (10Mb DSL) get 150GB/mo. at the most (compared to Comcast's across-the-board 250GB/mo. cap). Initially, AT&T will only impose this on new customers, or existing customers who break the 150GB/mo. limit, but expect to impose this to all customers. The relatively good news? Instead of being cut off, users who reach 80% of their caps will be contacted, then pay $1/GB for every GB used over the limit once it is reached."
Link to Original Source
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Microsoft Caught Disrespecting Photogs' IP rights.

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "Microsoft and Nikon had launched a recent competition called Iconic Britain", but had actively encouraged participants to scrape images off of the Web, and to submit the ones they thought best represented the UK. Problem is, this encouragement fell a bit short in the 'respecting others' copyrights' department... there has been a discussion thread on Flickr expressing various proofs and shades of outrage by users at having their photos ripped off. CNET News reports that they had contacted Microsoft and was told that Microsoft is currently "obtaining the rights", but does not have them yet (but still displays the images). Competition partner Nikon has pulled themselves out of the promotion entirely."
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Microsoft Blesses LGPL, Joins Apache Foundation

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "According to a somewhat jaw-dropping story in The Register, it appears that Microsoft has performed a trifecta of geek-scaring feats: They have joined the Apache Software Foundation as a Platimum member(at $100K USD a year), submitted LGPL-licensed patches for ADOdb, and have pledged to expand it's Open Specifications Promise by adding to the list more than 100 protocols for interoperability between its Windows Server and the Windows client. While I sincerely doubt they'll release Vista under a GPL license anytime soon, this is certainly an unexpected series of moves on their part, and could possibly lead to more OSS (as opposed to "Shared Source") interactivity between what is arguably Linux' greatest adversary and the Open Source community."
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US Senate pledges $1bn to stop P2P Child Porn

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Penguinisto writes "A US Senate panel approved a bill, setting up $1bn USD to help federal, state, and local police forces create special software that will track P2P networks in an attempt to catch child pornographers. Given the foibles and follies of MediaDefender, coupled with the possibility of criminal charges (instead of civil lawsuits) hinging on a similar application's results, this may prove to be sticky indeed with any innocent party who winds up getting accidentally fingered... Nothing yet on how they intend to address the conceptual and technical flaws that Media Defender have been shown to exhibit. Other provisions of the bill include closing existing potential loopholes in how child porn is generated and disseminated (e.g. altering an innocent image to make it look sexual in nature, etc). While I doubt that anyone would defend someone who actually engages in child exploitation and abuse, the technical underpinnings could have wider future implications as to how governments track and prosecute computer crimes."
Link to Original Source
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Saudi Arabia Detains Blogger

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "Saudi Arabia's Interior Ministry has confirmed that it is detaining Fouah al-Farhan for violation of 'security laws'. Farhan apparently knew it was coming, and warned about it almost two weeks in advance on his blog. Even in Pro-Western Saudi Arabia, laws are known to be rather draconian... while the poor guy most likely won't get his tongue cut out (so far they said that they merely wanted him to sign and post an apology), this bodes not well for attempts at opening up societies in the Middle East."
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SCO Admits It May Go Under Soon

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  about 7 years ago

Penguinisto writes "It appears that now even SCO is seeing that they're doomed. CNET reveals that in a public statement by SCO yesterday, it was announced that: "If a significant cash payment is required, or significant assets are put under a constructive trust, the carrying amount of our long-lived assets may not be recovered." So as a parallel to RMS Titanic, has the bow finally dropped below the waves, as shareholders and SCO employees scramble for the last few remaining lifeboat slots?"
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Law & Order Actor, Child Porn, and Geek Squad

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "After the last incident involving Geeks Squad and pornography, one would think they would tend to avoid prowling through users' hard drives. Then again, sometimes it can have, well positive consequences. Yet in supreme irony (in more ways than one), actor Albert Insinnia (of the television show Law and Order: Special Victims Unit) took his PC in to Geek Squad, where a worker there found child porn on his hard drive and turned him in to the cops."
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Citrix to buy XenSource for $500m

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "Apparently Citrix doesn't want to be left out in the cold when it came to Virtualization.So, it decided to snap up Xen Source in whole, with a combination of cash and stock. Question is, what impact exactly will this have on Linux as a whole? (Xen runs on/under Windows too, but Linux is arguably its biggest playground to date). Also, is this a defensive move on Citrix' part, given Microsoft's development of potential VMWare and Xen competitor Viridian?"
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AMD officially cuts prices, Intel likely to follow

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "Well, here it comes, as we hear AMD cry "Havok!" and let slip the pricetags of war". From the article: "the price cuts mean that all of the company's dual-core Athlon 64 X2 processors will be priced at less than $200, with the top-end Athlon 64 X2 6000+ now selling for $178. The two low-end models in AMD's dual-core line, the Athlon X2 3600+ and 3800+, have been dropped, making the Athlon X2 4000+ the new entry-level dual-core model at $73." Coupled with impending Intel price slashing, do we sit around and wait for the prices to get real good, or upgrade the older beasties among our collections this summer?"
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Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "A business has so far felt the very real pain of sotware patent enforcement — but this time, it is a large company who extinguished the little guy. Reyes Infografica had recently sent a Cease and Desist notice to a small Poser hobbyist programmer named Phil Cooke for his "Clothing Creator" program, claiming that it violates one of their patents (Phil's own site/support forum contains the copy of Reyes' C&D, Phil's announcement, and relevant discussions.) Clothing Creator has been out for a couple of years now. Basically, it builds quick custom clothing for humanoid 3d figures within the 3d compositing/rendering program called Poser. Recently, E-Frontier, the current owner of Poser, had partnered with Reyes to sell a competing product in E-Frontier's online store, called "Virtual Fashion". To E-Frontier's credit, they recently announced that they would stop selling the Reyes product until the dispute is settled, though at time of writing the product is still available for sale. So is this the "innovation" that software patents were supposed to foster?"
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Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Penguinisto (415985) writes "A few days ago, Phil Cooke, a small-time hobbyist 3D/CG programmer, was sent a Cease and Desist notice from Reyes Infografica over a small 3D/CG clothes-generating program he had sold for years (it generated clothing mesh for a figures in a CG hobbyist program known as Poser). The program has since been pulled from the maker's site, as he cannot afford to retain counsel with which to fight back. Apparently, Phil's program had collided against a software patent that Reyes filed in 2001 (the patent was filed in the US and Spain). The C&D notice, and some of the discussion surrounding it can be found a PhilC's site discussion forums. While we usually see stories about small-time patent trolls raking in huge bucks from large companies, is this an indication of a disturbing trend by larger companies using software patents to intimidate and eliminate their smaller competition? And if so, then how on Earth is this supposed to foster innovation and creativity?"

Journals

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Gawd, that felt good... or, trolling for Mac-Heads on /.

Penguinisto Penguinisto writes  |  more than 10 years ago ----Update, 12/06/04: I've recently sold my G4 Cube ($700 on eBay - go me!) and my brand new dual G5 will be arriving today via UPS...)---

Original journal entry below:

After a long stint of enjoying the grand experience here, and with more than just a little mischief, I decided to have a bit of fun with the masses.

I'd been toying around with the subject matter, and while reading comments in a rather decent article on securityfocus.com, it hit me: most folks claim that Linux users are some sort of ugly zealot-packed mob that rabidly attacks anything that dares impugn the Holy Penguin(tm, pat. pending, etc...)

Now, from experience, I know full well that Linux users are naught but docile saints compared to one particular segment of humanity: Mac users. Being bored, and having the appropriate mood, a wee article appeared that presented the perfect opportunity.

Knowing the shelf-life of a /. story, I had to act fast, but I think I pulled off a fairly decent entry that would separate the intelligent from the raving, drooling, eternally-pissed-off Mac zealots.

As of this writing, there are approximately three responses that successfully avoided the bait - two that actually approached it with some intelligence, one with a good dose of wit, and the rest? Well, the rest proved my point... a seething pack of anger-ridden zealots in the truest sense of the word. I bet most are still shaking at their desks from the adrenalin overload, clutching their iPods and grinding their teeth in white-hot rage.Click the link above and enjoy the show... :)

Perhaps I should include some caveats: One, I am a Macintosh user, and am the proud owner of a G4 Cube which I have successfully modified quite extensively. (I also own a P4-based PC, but I only use it for games and CG art proggies I can't find a Mac version for.) I guess I should also include the fact that I own neither a Dell DJ or an iPod... I instead prefer to play my music via the mp3 player on my Compaq 3536 PocketPC loaded with Linux Familiar and a big fat CF card... (this way I can play music and games on it, grab email, etc... )

Ah well, I guess I should be getting back to the site and read up about how my fellow Mac afficianados think I'm gay, an idiot, a clueless dumbass, etc etc. It's damned funny in a way, and I can always point to it in the future whenever the clueless folk at SecFocus decide to screech about "linux zealotry" or somesuch.

Until next time, Mousketeers...

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