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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

PeterM from Berkeley Not sure you're right (641 comments)

Yes, you can still get infected, but if you keep running into people who are infected with measles, you'll either get a full-blown case, a mild case, or a subclinical unnoticeable case.

97% chance you'll get a subclinical unnoticeable case. That means you GET measles, but the replication is quickly shut down by your immune system, which is primed to fight it. However, having just fought it, your immune system is EVEN MORE primed to fight it.

And measles in particular is so very, very contagious that if ANYONE near you has it, you're going to be exercising your immunity to it.

So, yeah, it's a "matter of time" until you get infected, but your infection is likely to be such that you don't even notice.

People who have such subclinical infections are probably very unlikely to spread the disease.

--PeterM

2 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

PeterM from Berkeley Get the flu shot even if it is 0% effective (641 comments)

Why?

    Because Big Pharma doesn't like losing money. If the risk is REALLY high that they'll miss the circulating flu viruses and have a poor vaccine, and then NOBODY BUYS IT, they lose all their money.

    And POOF, you won't have a Big Pharma company producing flu viruses THAT DO WORK (which they usually do), because of the risk.

    If, however, Big Pharma sells flu vaccine regardless of whether they got lucky or not, then we'll get flu vaccine EVERY YEAR, and in MOST years, they'll be good!

    So there's good argument for getting flu shots that aren't "the best", because if you don't support the industry when it is down, it won't be around NEXT year.

    And this completely ignores the seemingly unsubstantiated but plausible claim that even a bad match of flu shot will make the flu you get less severe.

--PeterM

2 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

PeterM from Berkeley Be thankful you are "temporarily abled" (641 comments)

I'm glad to hear that you don't get sick much and so your 25 days of vacation is working out for you.

I'm lucky too and I don't get sick much. However, I'm not confident that'll always be true. I have a co-worker who got cancer and is out for a few days every time she gets chemotherapy.

Could you POSSIBLY see yourself as maybe being unlucky someday, and not being able to cope anymore on the pittiance you're currently "perfectly happy with"? Or are you an invincible superhero?

Me, I've been lucky. So far. I'm downright thankful my employer lets me pile up sick leave in a SEPARATE pool and keep it indefinitely. It spares me from having to purchase short term disability. Because I may need it someday. I'm only human and all my good health that I've enjoyed could be taken from me in an instant.

--PeterM

2 days ago
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Pope Francis: There Are Limits To Freedom of Expression

PeterM from Berkeley Maybe because they're oppressed? (873 comments)

And maybe the 3% of the population experiences 80% of the oppression?

I mean, I'm a member of the "elect". I'm mainstream in sexuality, race, age, income, etc. I have it pretty good. Why should I bitch and moan?

But gays? They can't marry, they get sometimes get beatings by the 97% and face all kinds of other discrimination, why shouldn't they complain?

Even if the questionable claim you make that 80% of the "bitching and moaning" comes from gays is true, it doesn't LOGICALLY follow that that bitching and moaning isn't PERFECTLY justified.

I mean, frankly, your unsubstantiated claim against them kind of proves their point about having cause to bitch and moan, so in a way your post is sort of brilliant. You accuse them and justify them all in the same post!

--PeterM

about two weeks ago
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Seismological Society of America Claims Fracking Reactivated Ohio Fault

PeterM from Berkeley Fracking doesn't PUT stress on faults (168 comments)

At worst, it can release stress that is already there. So they can "cause" an earthquake. But it's the big motions of the ground that we have no influence over that really puts stress in the ground.

Isn't it true that stress that builds up over time would get released anyway, SOMETIME? (Unless the forces that caused the stress in the first place reversed so as to release it....)

I mean, the release of chemicals, water pollution and consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions are all reasonable charges to make against fracking, but as far as earthquakes, weren't they inevitable anyway?

Also, wouldn't triggering an earthquake cause a quake of less magnitude than would occur if allowed to build up and release naturally?

--PeterM

about three weeks ago
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The Coming Decline of 'Made In China'

PeterM from Berkeley Automated manufacturing (327 comments)

Haven't you heard? Manufacturing is coming back to America, bigtime. It's just coming back automated. Relatively few jobs are coming back with the manufacturing.

Hate to sound like a luddite, but what's a person to do for a job? Farming is automated, manufacturing is automated, even service industry jobs are becoming automated (self checkout at grocery stores, robotic stocking, brick and mortar retail dying out in favor of Amazon). Driving/shipping jobs are going to be automated.

And there just isn't much economic demand for lots of engineers and scientists and artists--a few of each can serve the entire planet and thus everyone who labors is trying to "supply" a few jobs with little demand for labor. And we can't all just doctor/nurse and sue each other. I don't see us making money entertaining each other either, there have to be people who can afford and pay for entertainment. Wages are going to crash, then what?

-PM

about three weeks ago
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Science Cannot Prove the Existence of God

PeterM from Berkeley But religion makes positive assertions about truth (755 comments)

One, religion asserts that God exists. Existence itself, but perhaps not meaning or other intangibles, certainly seems open to scientific enquiry.

However, it's hard to turn up evidence of existence of God.

Two, many religions assert origin stories for the universe. None of these match the physical evidence we have obtained without VERY liberal interpretation.

It is these types of assertions that the scientifically minded question the truth of. Softer assertions, like "people ought to be good to each other" don't find the same sort of opposition from science and logic.

about a month ago
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The One Mistake Google Keeps Making

PeterM from Berkeley Re:And for the people who can't drive (386 comments)

I haven't made a detailed study of the topic, if you really want to know you should research it.

However, my understanding is that prior to the creation of Social Security, the aged and infirm were often living in horrible conditions because they were no longer able to make income to take care of themselves and hadn't saved sufficiently to support themselves in old age.

Hence the establishment of Social Security, to alleviate this suffering. Most Americans, even today, save only a small fraction (if any) of their income for a "rainy day". When the paychecks stop coming, without Social Security, their situation gets quite dire.

However, with Social Security and better health care, fewer kids, and other Government mandated savings programs, the "old" demographic has become the richest, by and large, in the USA.

Personally I think it is time to stem the tide of wealth transfer from the now-poorer, younger demographics to the richest demographic (robbing from the poor to give to the rich) by raising the retirement age, ending the wage cap on social security tax, making the benefits taxable above a certain income threshold, and lowering the social security tax on the folks who are still working.

I don't think it makes much sense to have a Government program to make the most rich even richer at the expense of the poorer.

As for the social security recipients who will cry about this, well, take some responsbility. YOU voted in the Governments who spent the social security surplus into broader Government debt, now YOU can live with reduced benefits.

--PeterM

about a month ago
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The One Mistake Google Keeps Making

PeterM from Berkeley And for the people who can't drive (386 comments)

We have ever increasing armies of people who should not drive any longer, namely, the partly-disabled elderly.

Do they want to be dependent upon deliveries of food and drivers to go anywhere? Self-driving cars give this demographic independence, and it is a demographic that is growing. And it is a demographic that has THE MOST MONEY. (Yes, old people are the richest demographic in the USA now.)

Would YOU rather get a $60k car and be independent or not be able to go anywhere without a benefactor?

--PeterM

about a month ago
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Trees vs. Atmospheric Carbon: A Fight That Makes Sense?

PeterM from Berkeley Japan has managed to reforest (363 comments)

The rest of the world could do that too, but shouldn't do it the way Japan has done. They planted a monoculture of cedar trees, which produce lots of pollen and do little for biodiversity, and water retention. But they do a lot to promote allergies in the Japanese, 10% of whom now suffer from pollen allergies.

Instead of only planting economically useful trees, a good ecological mix should be planted....

--PM

about a month ago
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Trees vs. Atmospheric Carbon: A Fight That Makes Sense?

PeterM from Berkeley I'm for planting trees (363 comments)

But a major constraint to planting trees, at least in my area, is water. It's not like I can just stick them anywhere and they'll grow.

The arid conditions here pretty much preclude widespread reforestation.

As it is, the only trees I plant are trees that I will water, take care of, and eat the fruit from.

--PM

about a month ago
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Trees vs. Atmospheric Carbon: A Fight That Makes Sense?

PeterM from Berkeley Actually, most of that mass would be oxygen. (363 comments)

You are mostly water, 70%. Most of water by weight is oxygen by far. (16 parts in 18). So your heavy people plan would mostly sequester oxygen, temporarily.

--PeterM

about a month ago
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Trees vs. Atmospheric Carbon: A Fight That Makes Sense?

PeterM from Berkeley I have a lot of sympathy for planting fruit trees (363 comments)

But I don't think it's a practical solution to apply on a large scale in cities.

On my own property, if I'm going to water it, I'm going to eat it. But I take care of my trees and manage pests and clean up after them. I pick up every last fruit that drops. I put nets on the trees to keep the birds away so they don't damage 20x the fruit they eat.

I don't think we'd like what would happen to rodent and pest populations in cities if we didn't manage the fruit trees actively. Plus, with such widespread planting and without adequate systematic disease control, fruit tree diseases would become rampant and reduce your production greatly and perhaps even damage commercial production by supplying a large pest and disease reservoir.

I think it makes sense to plant fruit trees where you can convince locals to take over maintenance and management such that these are up to adequate levels. It'd be a good addition to the standard landscaping tree mix.

But the indiscriminate use of fruit trees that you're advocating would probably generate a counter-reaction as the nuisance consequences of unmanaged fruit trees builds up.

--PM

about a month ago
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Sony Pictures Leak Reveals Quashed Plan To Upload Phony Torrents

PeterM from Berkeley Seems like honeypots would work (130 comments)

For credit cards anyway. Put a bunch of "fake" credit cards out there. Some of them "work" but are actually traces. Users of these CC numbers get investigated and arrested immediately, because there are NO authorized users.

--PM

about a month ago
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Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

PeterM from Berkeley Re:Arsenic is NOT added to the water supply! EVER (1051 comments)

I didn't say it wasn't IN the water, I said it wasn't ADDED to city water supplies in order to kill rats.

about a month and a half ago
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Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

PeterM from Berkeley The draft (1051 comments)

If I can be forced into military service and be made to go fight and die, why can't I be forced, for the greater good, to get a jab in the arm that protects me (and everyone else) from getting some REALLY nasty diseases?

Or would you argue that compulsory military service is unconscionable too?

--PeterM

about a month and a half ago
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Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

PeterM from Berkeley Military service? (1051 comments)

Sir,

    If I can be made to join the military, be ordered to go fight and die, (for the greater good) by the Government, then I do NOT see why I can't be made to take a shot!

--PeterM

about a month and a half ago
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Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

PeterM from Berkeley Cough medicine in general doesn't really work (1051 comments)

Hate to tell you, but most OTC cough medicines don't really work very well at all, according to some studies that have come out recently.

http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-...

There *is* a study that says that dark chocolate, of all things, is pretty good at suppressing coughs.

http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-...

I welcome it if you cite sources to refute the credibility of either of the links I gave. At least you're thinking about the subject then. Myself, I'm actually not sure that cough medicines DON'T work and I'm not sure that chocolate does. But I sure like chocolate.

--PM

about a month and a half ago
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Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

PeterM from Berkeley The Government can force you to FIGHT and DIE (1051 comments)

In military service. I figure if I can be drafted, and be made to fight and quite possibly die to protect this country, I can be forced to get stuck with a needle to protect this country too!

Military service is FAR more invasive and dangerous, by many orders of magnitude, than a vaccination.

By that standard, forcing EVERYONE in this country to GET VACCINATED for the COMMON GOOD is about the most resounding slam dunk I've ever considered.

--PeterM

about a month and a half ago
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Time To Remove 'Philosophical' Exemption From Vaccine Requirements?

PeterM from Berkeley Arsenic is NOT added to the water supply! EVER (1051 comments)

And certainly not to kill rats! Any level of arsenic in the water supply that would kill rats would kill every PERSON who drinks it in short order!

In fact, the standard for "potable" water, at least in the USA, says that effort should be made to drive the concentration of arsenic in tap water to ZERO.

--PM

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Magnetic monopoles observed as emergent property

PeterM from Berkeley PeterM from Berkeley writes  |  more than 5 years ago

PeterM from Berkeley writes " This brief from Science Daily reports the claimed detection of magnetic monopoles an emergent property in a crystalline lattice of Dysprosium Titanate at temperatures between .6K and 2K. According to the article, these magnetic monopoles interact similarly to electrically charged particles. These are not isolated magnetic monopoles in the same sense that electrons are isolated, mobile charges: instead these monopoles appear at the end of tubes of magnetic flux called "Dirac strings". These were theorized in 1931 by Dirac, but have only just now been observed."
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First ever application of string theory

PeterM from Berkeley PeterM from Berkeley writes  |  more than 5 years ago

PeterM from Berkeley writes "Scientists are claiming to have made the first practical application of string theory to the problem of high temperature superconductivity, a physical phenomenon no one has previously been able to explain. This brief from Science Daily presents an overview of an article published in Science. String theory has come under fire for producing no testable predictions. This would represent a first application of string theory to a practical problem and one where other theories have provided no explanation."

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