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Study Rules Out Global Warming Being a Natural Fluctuation With 99% Certainty

Phopojijo Re:Deniers (869 comments)

The first step to finding a solution is admitting you have a problem. That's where we start.

about 7 months ago
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NVIDIA's G-Sync Is VSync Designed For LCDs (not CRTs)

Phopojijo Re: Will it work with game consoles? (139 comments)

Actually, Gabe Newell at last year's CES (last January) was talking about NVIDIA Maxwell architecture. He claims NVIDIA will allow GPU virtualization for gaming applications. In other words, one PC could power multiple netbooks or Roku-style Steam boxes.

That said, split-screen (even multi-monitor "split-screen") is cool and occasionally occurs in PC games.

about a year ago
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NVIDIA's G-Sync Is VSync Designed For LCDs (not CRTs)

Phopojijo Re:But.. (139 comments)

Fir..! Dangit : ( Guess not.

about a year ago
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Phopojijo Re:Great if you have real broadband (84 comments)

"Perpetual Motion Engine" can operate on the FILE protocol. You can point the web browser to a web page located on your hard drive (or a USB thumb drive) and it will work.

It can be run from a website over HTTP, but does not need to be. Heck, you could even burn it to a DVD and double-click the index.html file in it.

about a year ago
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Phopojijo Re:summary has weird language (84 comments)

Actually the demo doesn't raytrace. In this demo "scene" (one triangle) it uses barycentric coordinates to determine if a pixel is inside or outside of a triangle. If it is inside? It shades it with one of two functions. These two functions derive red, green, and blue from how far the pixel is away from a vertex compared to the distance between that vertex and the center of the opposite edge (the animated function also has a time component). If it is outside the triangle? Pixel is skipped.

The specific algorithm is somewhat irrelevant (although it is actually pretty efficient for very large triangles). The point is that the GPUs are not limited to scanline triangles passed by a graphics API anymore.

about a year ago
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Phopojijo Re:and they can't use a 2nd/3rd/4th core why? (84 comments)

Because a GeForce Titan has about 2700 cores and about 4.5 teraflops of performance.

But yes, even CPUs have OpenCL drivers so (albeit Intel's is buggy as heck for the time being) so you could even select your CPU as your "graphics processor" and it would run... just slowly.

about a year ago
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Phopojijo Re:I/O Bandwidth (84 comments)

Only if you want it to! You can share resources between OpenCL and OpenGL without passing through the CPU.

Now, of course, you may wish to (example: copy to APU memory, run physics, copy to GPU memory, render)... but the programmer needs to explicitly queue a memory move command to do so. If the programmer doesn't move the content... it stays on wherever it is.

about a year ago
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Phopojijo Re:STAAAAAHP! (84 comments)

It's getting much closer. Most ASM.js demos show C++-compiled-into-Javascript is only half performance of native C++ (and getting faster). That's a difference between 30fps and 60fps if all code was Javascript. WebCL, on the other hand, is almost exactly OpenCL speeds... so for GPU-accelerated apps (depending on whether Javascript or WebCL is your primary bottleneck) you could get almost native performance.

SmallPtGPU, from the testing I did a while ago, seems to be almost the same speed whether run in WebCL via Javascript or OpenCL via C++

about a year ago
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Phopojijo Re:Missing the point? (84 comments)

Some want to use the same algorithms OpenGL and DirectX does... and those APIs are still for them.

Some do not. A good example is Epic Games who, in 2008, predicted "100% of the rendering code" for Unreal Engine 4 would be programmed directly for the GPUs. The next year they found the cost prohibitive so they kept with DirectX and OpenGL at least for a while longer. Especially for big production houses, if there is a bug or a quirk in the rendering code, it would be nice to be able to fix the problem directly rather than hack in a workaround.

about a year ago
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated By WebCL

Phopojijo Re:STAAAAAHP! (84 comments)

Actually, I look at web browsers as an art platform. It is programmed by a set of open standards which gives any person or organization the tools to build support for the content which is relevant to society. A video game, designed in web standards, could be preserved for centuries by whoever deems it culturally relevant.

For once, we have a gaming platform (besides Linux and BSD) which allows genuine, timeless art. If the W3C, or an industry body like them, creates an equivalent pseudo-native app platform... then great. For now, the web is the best we have.

about a year ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can Valve's Steam Machines Compete Against New Xbox, PS4?

Phopojijo Is it supposed to? (1 comments)

I am not really sure Valve is intending to compete with the next generation of consoles. To me, Steam Machines seem to be filling the niche left behind by "Media Center Extenders". In other words, using the PC ecosystem to widen the market currently dominated by Rokus and invaded by consoles. It will overlap with consoles, and may even prove them redundant, but I do not see Steam Machines as aimed at consoles.

about a year ago
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Console Manufacturers Want the Impossible?

Phopojijo Re:Really? (316 comments)

Some quarters they make a lot of money, other quarters they lose a lot of money; net is pretty near zero over the whole console life-cycle.

Had they not wasted so much money and worked on an open platform, they would have steady profits almost the entire time.

about a year and a half ago
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Console Manufacturers Want the Impossible?

Phopojijo Re:Let me get this straight... (316 comments)

(2) Seems to be the theme of the last two generations.

about a year and a half ago
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Console Manufacturers Want the Impossible?

Phopojijo Re:Really? (316 comments)

Not only that, but that is roughly 2000$ of license fees (~$10/game + 50$/yr * 10 years + "tons of peripherals and crap" which I'll conservatively say is $500) that you did not need to pay if you didn't game on a console.

And once your consoles break and are out of support... all that money has nothing to run on.

Not only is it not profitable for Microsoft and Sony... but customers, like you, who overpaid for disposable content.

about a year and a half ago
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HSA Foundation Formed By AMD, ARM, Ti, Imagination, and MediaTek

Phopojijo Re:What we programmer needs ... (51 comments)

The ironic part is that an X86 instruction hasn't been mapped to dedicated hardware for decades. It just signals a series of micro-ops to perform the calculation.

That started back when we were still doing most of our applications in assembly... and people were begging Intel for the most arbitrary of operations in-silicon.

Then of course when we switched to compilers only about 10% of those operations were used 90% of the time... which is why ARM got so efficient and cheap... because they built their committee around that Turing-complete small set of instructions that compilers would most likely use... rather than Intel's obfuscation to make assembly programmers not want to light themselves up in a gas fire.

So I guess... sort of a bad example?

more than 2 years ago
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HSA Foundation Formed By AMD, ARM, Ti, Imagination, and MediaTek

Phopojijo Re:What we programmer needs ... (51 comments)

Actually it is a bit bigger of a problem than that.

There actually is a form of assembly language for GPUs. NVIDIA has PTX... I don't know what ATi/AMD's is called but I saw some of it in passing.

The actual problem from my perspective is that the assembly language is modified and optimized by the drivers before it reaches the chip. The assembly-style PTX code you send to the drivers does not relate to the machine code which the GPU executes. That kind-of defeats the purpose of the assembly language.

That seems to be one of the reasons why you see people like John Carmack who do unique things always complain about boxing GPU drivers... and why it is so difficult to virtualize a GPU. Maybe that will be solved starting with GK110? We will have to find out exactly what makes NVIDIA's latest part so easy to run through a VM to figure that out unfortunately. Hopefully it means the end of ridiculously complicated drivers.

more than 2 years ago
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HSA Foundation Formed By AMD, ARM, Ti, Imagination, and MediaTek

Phopojijo Re:Ti (51 comments)

Samsung is a big developer of processors and one of the world's few FABs actually. ((I actually forgot to mention Qualcomm as an absentee for some reason -- they're a big no-show too.)) Though Apple, I agree, is little love lost. They design chips... but barely; they would not really contribute much to this arrangement; and if they sink by excluding themselves then it will only be them to be hurt in that deal.

more than 2 years ago
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HSA Foundation Formed By AMD, ARM, Ti, Imagination, and MediaTek

Phopojijo Re:Ti (51 comments)

Yeah... the list of major absentees is NVIDIA, Apple, Samsung, and Intel. Pretty big holes... but pretty big names present too. We shall see.

more than 2 years ago
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HSA Foundation Formed By AMD, ARM, Ti, Imagination, and MediaTek

Phopojijo Re:Ti (51 comments)

Hah -- yeah I noticed that just after I clicked submit. Somehow I missed it while I was writing it and previewing it. Oh well.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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AMD's Chief Architect of Mantle on Asymmetric GPU Pairings and Graphics Pipeline

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  about 9 months ago

Phopojijo (1603961) writes "Guennadi Riguer, chief architect of Mantle at AMD, answered a few questions about the technical details of their new graphics API. Of particular note, he discussed the potential for game developers to load balance across mismatched Mantle-supporting GPUs (for example, if an end user purchased a new video card and installed it alongside their old one). He also discussed how the graphics pipeline is evolving and the possibility of fixed-function hardware doing the same."
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Ask Slashdot: How to Protect Your Passwords from Amnesia.

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  about 10 months ago

Phopojijo (1603961) writes "So, you can encrypt your password library using a client-side manager or encrypted file container. You could practice your password every day, keep no written record, and do everything else right. You then go in for a serious operation or get in a terrible accident and, when you wake up, suffer severe memory loss. Slashdot readers, what do you consider an acceptable trade-off between proper security and preventing a data-loss catastrophe? I will leave some details and assumptions up to interpretation (budget, whether you have friends or co-workers to rely on, whether your solution will defend against the Government, chance of success, and so forth). For instance, would you split your master password in pieces and pay an attourney to contact you with a piece of it in case of emergency? Would you get a safe deposit box? Some biometric device? Leave the password with your husband, wife, or significant other? What can Slashdot come up with?"
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AMD R9 290X "up to 1GHz" tests like 727 MHz (base), 850-880 MHz (boost).

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  1 year,16 days

Phopojijo (1603961) writes "The recently released AMD Radeon R9 290X has an advertised shader clock rate of "up to 1GHz". The card brought formerly $1000-level performance down to a $550 price point. Its benchmarks tend to fluctuate wildly, however, based on the card's ability to maintain an intended maximum temperature of 95C. By analyzing across a variety of fan speeds, AMD's default settings are characteristic of a 727 MHz base clock with an average boost to 850-880 MHz. At these defaults, the card will not maintain 1GHz for more than a couple of minutes (or less)."
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NVIDIA's G-Sync Is VSync Designed for LCDs (not CRTs).

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  about a year ago

Phopojijo (1603961) writes "A monitor redraws itself top to bottom because of how the electron guns in CRT monitors used to operate. VSync was created to align the completed frames, computed by a videocard, to the start of each monitor draw; without it, midway through a monitor's draw process, a break (horizontal tear) would be visible on screen between the two time-slices of animation.

Pixels on LCD monitors do not need to wait for above lines of pixels to be drawn, but they do. G-Sync is a technology from NVIDIA to make monitor refresh rates variable. The monitor will time its draws to whenever the GPU is finished rendering. A scene which requires 40ms to draw will have a smooth "framerate" of 25FPS instead of trying to fit in some fraction of 60 FPS."
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Software Rendering Engine GPU-Accelerated by WebCL

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  about a year ago

Phopojijo (1603961) writes "OpenGL and DirectX have been the dominant real-time graphics APIs for decades. Both are catalogs of functions which convert geometry into images using predetermined mathematical algorithms (scanline rendering, triangles, etc.). Software rendering engines calculate colour values directly from the fundamental math. Reliance on OpenGL and DirectX could diminish when GPUs are utilized as general "large batches of math" solvers which software rendering engines offload to. Developers would then be able to choose their algorithms for best suits their project, even native to web browsers with the upcoming WebCL."
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Console Manufacturers Want the Impossible?

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Phopojijo (1603961) writes "Consoles have not really been able to profitably scale over the last decade or so. Capital is sacrificed to gain control over their marketshare and, even with the excessive lifespan of this recent generation, cannot generate enough revenue with that control to be worth it. Have we surpassed the point where closed platforms can be profitable and will we need to settle on an industry body, such as W3C or Khronos, to fix a standard for companies to manage slices of and compete within?"
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Will Windows RT Be the Future?

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  about 2 years ago

Phopojijo writes "Microsoft might be on their way to removing legacy support from future versions of Windows. With the recent announcement from Bill Gates that Microsoft intends to evolve Windows Phone and Windows 8 into a single platform, there could be a time where the Windows Store becomes our only way to install applications on our PCs. Would this mean a government could request for Microsoft to block and remove encryption applications or games which discuss same-sex relationships from your PC? At some point will we be reliant on open-source operating systems to preserve personal computing?"
Link to Original Source
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Video Games Do Not Want to Be Art?

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Phopojijo writes "Art of the past only persists today because they were based on timeless platforms such as canvas and inks. Fans want their medium to be art and will fight any critic who refutes the artistic merits of video games. These gamers also ignore community-supported platforms in exchange for proprietary and often intentionally disposable ones such as consoles and DRM in the name of simplicity and fear over piracy or used sales. If video games are intrinsically valuable art – shouldn’t we be fighting for it to be accessible forever like all other art mediums by using platforms like Linux or BSD?"
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HSA Foundation founded by AMD, ARM, Ti, Imagination, and MediaTek

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Phopojijo writes "To wrap up his “The Programmers Guide to a Universe of Possibility” keynote during the 2012 AMD Fusion Developer’s Summit, Phil Rogers of AMD announced the establishment of the HSA Foundation. The foundation has been instituted to create and maintain open standards to ease programming for a wide variety of processing resources including discrete and integrated GPUs. Founding members include ARM, Texas Instruments, Imagination, MediaTek, Texas Instruments, as well as AMD. Parallels can be drawn between this and AMD’s “virtual gorilla” initiative back from the late 1990’s."
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The Decay of the Atom Processor

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Phopojijo writes "It is easy to pass judgment on the netbook form factor but the problem was always its processing ability — the form factor just inherited the blame by association. Low-voltage adaptations of mainstream architectures will soon collide against ARM and leave low-power x86 architectures with no legitimate room to exist: “Intel is likely to continue on with Atom in computers, but only because it will be easy to offer the fruits of its smartphone endeavors in desktop and laptop PCs. There’s no particular reason for Intel to kill it but – in regards to laptops and desktops – there’s no reason for Intel to make it better.”"
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OpenCL has a competitor: Microsoft C++ AMP

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Phopojijo writes "Microsoft was at AMD's Fusion Developer Summit with a keynote this morning outlining Microsoft's part in the unified computing initiative. Currently your options for easily utilizing all your computing power are limited to Apple-founded OpenCL maintained by the Khronos Group. Microsoft's alternative is called C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism (or C++ AMP). Microsoft was clear to announce that C++ AMP would be an open specification. Any interested compiler developer would be allowed to support this specification."
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AMD A-Series Llano APU Platform Review

Phopojijo Phopojijo writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Phopojijo writes "AMD kicked off their AMD Fusion Developer Summit 2011 today and reviews of their new Llano APU are starting to trickle out. The thought is that combining a GPU on the CPU decreases the barrier to entry to having a decent GPU in your system. While the CPU performance seemed to be a bit behind Intel's offering the GPU performance is definitely a step or more above Intel's offering."
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