×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

The Legacy of CPU Features Since 1980s

PhrostyMcByte Easily my favorite modern features (180 comments)

The latest generation of CPUs have instructions to support transactional memory.

Near future CPUs will have a SIMD instruction set taken right out of GPUs where you can conditionally execute without branching.

about two weeks ago
top

NASA's New Horizons To Arrive At Pluto With Clyde Tombaugh's Ashes

PhrostyMcByte Re:It's a first... (108 comments)

Makes me wonder if any other astronomers or other scientists to discover celestial objects will have their ashes sent in homage...

It's a romantic notion, but strikes me as not really in the spirit of science. If I knew someone was going to explore this awesome thing I discovered, I would much rather have them use every bit of available weight to further that discovery.

about three weeks ago
top

NetHack Development Team Polls Community For Advice On Unicode

PhrostyMcByte Re:utf-32/ucs-4 (165 comments)

Extracting a character - trivial. Length of string - trivial.

I don't think it's quite as simple as you think. UTF-8 is a variable-length encoding, but UTF-32 is too when you consider grapheme clusters.

When you extract characters and and determine length, are you only talking about code points (not very useful) or are you taking into consideration combining characters to account for actual visible glyphs that most people would consider to be a character?

The overwhelming majority of apps are only doing trivial operations -- string concatenation and shuffling bits to some API to display text. For these apps, choice of encoding really does not matter. NetHack is very likely in this category.

Anything more and you'll have to deal with variable-length data for both UTF-8 and UTF-32. So it doesn't really matter. Choose whichever uses less storage space.

about three weeks ago
top

NetHack Development Team Polls Community For Advice On Unicode

PhrostyMcByte Re:Use utf if you must, for character names, only. (165 comments)

For which implimentation of UTF to use, I'd go with utf8 as it seems to have the widest adoption, or 32 because that will probably allow you the longest time before having to think about this again. I would avoid the middle ground.

UTF-8, while originally only defined to 31 bits and now defined to 21 bits, actually has room to trivially extend up to 43 bits. One could say it's more future-proof than UTF-32. Not that it really matters -- we're only using 17 bits right now so I doubt we'll ever get past 21. Maybe when we encounter intelligent alien life.

about three weeks ago
top

If the Programmer Won't Go To Silicon Valley, Should SV Go To the Programmer?

PhrostyMcByte Micro-management kills this idea every time (294 comments)

No matter what your industry is, some PHB is going to get into a position where they feel out of control and unproductive if they can't get instant gratification popping in on their people to micro-manage them. In-person meetings are a must for these people.

about a month ago
top

Vinyl's Revival Is Now a Phenomenon On Both Sides of the Atlantic

PhrostyMcByte Not 100%... but hipsters (278 comments)

There are a few types I see doing this.

You'll always have those insane people who think Vinyl has better quality than CDs or FLAC... but I imagine they are a pretty small group.

You've got people who're after the experience -- maybe a more personal feel to having a big physical system that needs more interaction. Again I imagine this is larger than the first group, but still relatively small.

And finally you've got hipsters, who'll do anything just because nobody else is doing it. Very suspicious that vinyl's popularity starts to grow with a strong correlation to this group's size.

about a month ago
top

The Interview Bombs In US, Kills In China, Threatens N. Korea

PhrostyMcByte Counter-culture in full effect! (288 comments)

So many people are panning this movie. Have you guys posting negative comments actually seen it, or are you just reacting to the press?

I mean, I get it -- there's bound to be some sort of automatic counter-culture response to defend against the massive amount of press talking about how controversial and important it is.

Yes, it's a little controversial to target an actual country and an actual leader so directly. But you know what, their message while embellished for comedic effect isn't really far off base. I think the world could use some more of this controversy, and there's nothing saying this type of thing needs to be in dry journalistic form.

As far as the movie itself goes --- it's a Seth Rogan bromance dick joke movie. It really doesn't bring anything new to the table. It's not his best movie, but it's by no means bad. It's fun and entertained me the whole way through.

about a month ago
top

Net Neutrality Comments Overtaxed FCC's System

PhrostyMcByte Re:They only store them for us to read (32 comments)

They've already given word they intend to throw out comments that don't give an in-depth analysis... so the great majority of these comments that are just like "hey i use this stuff, please don't fuck with it" will just be ignored.

about a month ago
top

Many DDR3 Modules Vulnerable To Bit Rot By a Simple Program

PhrostyMcByte Re:Does the cache control commands require root ac (138 comments)

No. These are standard instructions that many apps require to function correctly when using multiple threads. Even if you aren't using them directly, at least some of the APIs you use most certainly are.

about a month ago
top

Minecraft Creator Notch's $70 Million Mansion Recreated In Minecraft

PhrostyMcByte Re:Waste (170 comments)

Makes you wonder what kind of good could have been done or how many lives could have been saved with that $70 million.

It's not like he's throwing bills into a fire. That money goes back into the economy which is good for everybody, and its recipients are still free to spend it on whatever good deeds they want.

about a month ago
top

Hackers Used Nasty "SMB Worm" Attack Toolkit Against Sony

PhrostyMcByte Can we stop the embellishment? (177 comments)

I haven't seen any evidence that the mechanics of the attack itself is at all noteworthy, yet we keep hearing about how this attack was unstoppable, "nasty", etc. -- not just from Sony's PR guys, but from the FBI. As if it could have targeted literally any company and caused just as unmitigated damage.

To me, a "nasty" worm is Stuxnet: it spread in a very standard innocuous way and seemed like any other worm, but ended up being highly targeted.

This Sony hack just seems like your average trojan worm leaking an admin password back to someone. The only noteworthy part of this hack is that Sony had such horrifyingly moronic security practices that one attack was able to compromise such a large and varying corpus of valuable data.

about a month ago
top

Sony Leaks Reveal Hollywood Is Trying To Break DNS

PhrostyMcByte Re:black DNS? (388 comments)

Funny, Microsoft has actually had a P2P DNS system for several years: PNRP.

about a month and a half ago
top

Are the TSA's New Electronic Device Screenings Necessary?

PhrostyMcByte Even the TSA knows they've become a joke (184 comments)

Last flight I took out of LAX, they were randomly handing out "expedited security" slips to people. Keep your shoes on, laptops can stay in bags, no x-rays or pat-downs, etc. and I was through in about 30 seconds. I even found out after I went through the metal detector that I had left keys in my pocket and my belt on.

Basically, it was like security used to be, pre-9/11. It was marvelous.

about a month and a half ago
top

Bank Security Software EULA Allows Spying On Users

PhrostyMcByte Re:Bank Security Guy here (135 comments)

Let us know which bank. I'm sure some of us would switch!

about a month and a half ago
top

BitTorrent Launches Project Maelstrom, the First Torrent-Based Browser

PhrostyMcByte Re:Freenet? (67 comments)

Freenet had some issues. Most of them won't apply to BitTorrent's offering.

The main one is receiving content was dog slow compared to, say, Tor. This is simply an artifact of how it was routing connections and the distributed storage aspect.

Second, but still contributing to the poor experience is that the app itself had some architectural flaws that made it and your PC run dog slow -- the choice was either use hundreds of threads or let the operations stall.

The third, more of a security/philosophical flaw, is that the base protocol was not documented in any significant fashion. To review the protocol's security, you'd need to have an expert understanding of Java and a large part of the codebase. So it never really had many eyes on it looking for flaws.

I haven't used Freenet in around 5 years, so this may have improved. It was pretty clear why it never caught on at the time.

about a month and a half ago
top

Microsoft Introduces .NET Core

PhrostyMcByte Re:why would I write to that? (187 comments)

Merely needing to convert time zones is a trivial requirement. Work with them any other way and it's a nightmare. My first exposure to it was when implementing a crontab-like scheduling software, which on proper implementations has defined behavior to not fall on its face when daylight savings time wreaks havoc on the world. I couldn't find a way to do this reliably in .NET, but Noda made it possible.

Don't take my word on why Noda should be used though... read from it's blog for plenty of examples for why the seemingly great .NET DateTime can be a minefield in far more common situations than mine.

about 2 months ago
top

Microsoft Introduces .NET Core

PhrostyMcByte Re:why would I write to that? (187 comments)

Why should I have to use a third party library to get decent date support?

I've questioned that myself while working in .NET. Ever needed to write time zone aware code?

Date libraries, as it turns out, are rather monstrously difficult to make. While .NET did a great job for the common stuff, uncommon things can be painful, error prone, or impossible.

The fullest solution I've found so far is Noda Time, which is actually based on the Joda-Time Java library. It feels out of place with a number of Javaisms still in it, but it provides a much richer functionality and better separation of concerns.

about 2 months ago
top

Microsoft Introduces .NET Core

PhrostyMcByte Re:Minor revision? (187 comments)

.NET Core is the redesign.

.NET Framework (the full big monolithic install like we've got now) remains backwards-compatible and so 4.6 is appropriate.

about 2 months ago
top

Valve Rolls Out Game Broadcasting Service For Steam

PhrostyMcByte Re:Works but it's CPU hungry (92 comments)

Recent video cards support encoding an H.264 stream directly from the screen without ever touching the CPU. If Steam isn't currently using this functionality, I'm sure it will soon.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

top

Judge rules BitTorrent cases must be tried separately

PhrostyMcByte PhrostyMcByte writes  |  about a year ago

PhrostyMcByte (589271) writes "TorrentFreak reports that Iowa Judge Stephanie Rose recently put a thorn in the plans of copyright holders hoping to file cheap mass-doe lawsuits against alleged pirates. Rejecting all but one Doe for such a lawsuit, Rose's order mentions that the plaintiffs have failed to demonstrate the five Does in the case were a part of the same "transaction" needed to be tried together, with an uncommon understanding of BitTorrent showing that "...even in all five cases where Doe defendants allegedly have “hit dates” on the same day and close in time, there is no showing that the earlier defendants were still connected to the Internet and actively distributing data through the BitTorrent client at the same time as the later defendants.""
Link to Original Source
top

Japan to fish space junk with kilometers-wide net

PhrostyMcByte PhrostyMcByte writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PhrostyMcByte (589271) writes "JAXA, Japan's space agency, is teaming up with fishing net manufacturer Nitto Seimo Co. to build a kilometers-wide net to orbit the Earth and collect space junk. The net would eventually be pulled by the Earth's magnetic fields to burn up in the atmosphere along with its contents."
Link to Original Source
top

Black hole emits a 1,000 light-year wide fireball

PhrostyMcByte PhrostyMcByte writes  |  more than 4 years ago

PhrostyMcByte writes "12 million light-years away in the outer spiral of galaxy NGC 7793, a bubble of hot gas approximately 1,000 light-years in diameter can be found shooting out of a black hole — one of the most powerful jets of energy ever seen. The bubble has been growing for approximately 200,000 years, and is expanding at around 1,000,000 kilometers per hour."
Link to Original Source
top

Origin of Species to be given for free, with FUD

PhrostyMcByte PhrostyMcByte writes  |  more than 5 years ago

PhrostyMcByte writes "November 24th will mark the 150th anniversary of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, the pivotal work that helped bring the theory of evolution through natural selection into popularity. Around this same time, Growing Pains star Kirk Cameron is spearheading a plan to pass out 50,000 free copies at universities around the country. The catch? Each copy will be altered to include creationist propaganda and FUD targeting evolution and Darwin himself."
Link to Original Source

Journals

PhrostyMcByte has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?