Beta

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Apple Kills Aperture, Says New Photos App Will Replace It

PhunkySchtuff Re:In addition... (214 comments)

Aperture won't currently run in Yosemite. Aperture will be updated to run under Yosemite but that's the last update it's going to get.
http://arstechnica.com/apple/2...

about a month ago
top

3D-Printed Material Can Carry 160,000 Times Its Own Weight

PhunkySchtuff Re:Watch the movie. Not only about carrying weight (60 comments)

Printing with light, AKA Stereolithography has been around for a long time. The news here is that they're printing feature sizes that are smaller than the wavelength of the light they are using. This involves using metamaterials with a negative index of refraction (among other things)

about a month ago
top

A Seriously High Speed Video Camera (Video)

PhunkySchtuff Re:Like you could tell the difference between 60fp (62 comments)

Can't tell if serious or trolling.

These cameras are used for slowing things down. You shoot at, say, 600 frames per second and then you can slow it down by 20 times to 30 fps. Watching the video at 30 fps then shows a very smooth slow-motion view of what's happening 20 times faster. One of the examples he gave was in process manufacturing - if you have an assembly line that's jamming at a point, and you can't see why as it's all happening too quickly, shoot it at a high frame rate, slow it down and go over it frame by frame if you need to. Either that or make videos of stuff breaking, getting shot or having water splashed on it and put it on youtube. People love seeing that stuff in slow motion.

about a month and a half ago
top

Group Demonstrates 3,000 Km Electric Car Battery

PhunkySchtuff Re:Hm.... (363 comments)

I'm going to guess that you're joking here. Cars already need to be regularly filled up with fluids of all sorts and people seem to be able remember to do that, granted with the help of a small gauge in the instrument cluster.

about 2 months ago
top

Standards Group Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort

PhunkySchtuff Re:I didn't realise they didn't already did that. (82 comments)

What's "purely digital" about a LCD? For a start, there's nothing in this article talking about VGA. I'm talking about DisplayPort (as is the linked article) which has a signal path from the GPU to the monitor (and if you want to be pedantic about it, the DisplayPort interface on the rear of the monitor) that is purely digital. However, if you really want to take it to it's illogical extreme, even the digital signalling used by DisplayPort is, at it's heart, analogue voltages travelling down a bunch of copper wires.

Either way, the signal path, the communications channel, that still has things like a vertical blanking interval and runs between the GPU and the electronics in the monitor is purely digital.

about 3 months ago
top

Standards Group Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort

PhunkySchtuff Re:I didn't realise they didn't already did that. (82 comments)

Yeah, I always found it strange that even a purely digital flat panel monitor still "emulates" a vertical refresh interval signal...

about 3 months ago
top

Standards Group Adds Adaptive-Sync To DisplayPort

PhunkySchtuff Re:I didn't realise they didn't already did that. (82 comments)

I haven't RTFA, but from what I understand of it, it's not syncing the output from the graphics card to the vertical blanking interval on the monitor, it's the other way around. It's running the monitor at a variable frame rate so that if you're running at (say) 60Hz refresh and the next frame takes 1/60th second + a tiny bit, the monitor can hold off painting the new frame until the data is there to paint it, rather than waiting for 2/60th second before displaying an updated frame. Or, if the next frame is ready early, and the monitor can do so, it can paint the new frame early - so the monitor isn't running at 60Hz, it's running in sync with the output of the graphics card.

about 3 months ago
top

NSA Allegedly Exploited Heartbleed

PhunkySchtuff Re:Do it enough times (149 comments)

Private key grabbed. Game over.
One successful attempt took >2.5M requests over a day. Second successful attempt was something like 100k requests.

http://blog.cloudflare.com/the...

It's all in the luck of the draw. When you don't have any logging of this, you've got no idea how long people have been poking at this and literally no idea what anyone has made off with.

about 4 months ago
top

Dyn.com Ends Free Dynamic DNS

PhunkySchtuff Re:Viable Replacement? (242 comments)

Yes, I thought that was the case, but I still got all sorts of junk subdomains registered... Maybe there was a problem with the way my domains were registered, I don't know. Either way, I moved them away...

about 4 months ago
top

Dyn.com Ends Free Dynamic DNS

PhunkySchtuff Re:Viable Replacement? (242 comments)

Yep, I found that too. I had a privately registered domain with afraid.org that still allowed other people to create their own hostnames in that domain. These hostnames were then used to spread malware with the result that I was receiving notices from Google saying my web site was compromised.

I had, say, www.example.com and then others were making asd34ghjb5fbs.example.com and using that to spread malware. Google saw that I owned example.com and so I received the notifications. I'd log into afraid.org and shut down all the hostnames that I didn't create, but they kept getting made even though I had private registration on my domain name.

about 4 months ago
top

Dyn.com Ends Free Dynamic DNS

PhunkySchtuff Re:Viable Replacement? (242 comments)

I've had problems with afraid.org where a privately registered domain I held allowed other people to create their own hostnames in that domain. These hostnames were then used to spread malware with the result that I was receiving notices from Google saying my web site was compromised.

I had, say, www.example.com and then others were making asd34ghjb5fbs.example.com and using that to spread malware. Google saw that I owned example.com and so I received the notifications. I'd log into afraid.org and shut down all the hostnames that I didn't create, but they kept getting made even though I had private registration on my domain name.

about 4 months ago
top

Microsoft Remotely Deleted Tor From Windows Machines To Stop Botnet

PhunkySchtuff Re:A Microsoft Killswitch (214 comments)

Some people find TOR using a Chrome browser. Should they have the authority to remove that too only to tell you about it later in a blog?

No, of course not. Old, known-bad versions of TOR that have numerous exploits active in the wild are removed. Not Chrome browser as it's not malicious software.

To quote another poster a few threads down

If a PC was infected with Sefnit and had the signature old version of Tor in the hidden location, Tor was removed because it's logically the case that Tor was just part of the virus payload. Because of the unique install directory, there wasn't even a remote chance for false positives. Publicly available tools that can be used for good or bad are hijacked by viruses all the time, and it's never a surprise if an anti-virus removes that tool when the virus specific files are removed.

about 7 months ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Managing Device-Upgrade Bandwidth Use?

PhunkySchtuff Apple Caching Service (159 comments)

On any Mac in your office, running 10.8 (Mountain Lion) or 10.9 (Mavericks) purchase (for $20 or so), download and install the OS X Server app.
Turn on the Caching service. Problem solved for Apple devices.

The server then registers itself with Apple, they see the registration coming from your IP, so when further devices from that IP address request a software update, these machines are pointed to your internal Caching server. Then, when a device (or a Mac) tries to download an update or purchase something from the App store, it will come from the persistent cache in preference to the WAN.

about 7 months ago
top

Stolen Adobe Passwords Were Encrypted, Not Hashed

PhunkySchtuff Re:Am I imagining it? (230 comments)

Sorry to disagree, but I feel there SHOULD be a password hint field. I also, however, feel that it should be encrypted. And that it shouldn't be allowed to contain the password.

And how should it be decrypted?

about 9 months ago
top

Stolen Adobe Passwords Were Encrypted, Not Hashed

PhunkySchtuff Re:Am I imagining it? (230 comments)

This is a huge part of the problem. Just about all security researchers (white or black hat) will have an account with Adobe - even if it's using a throwaway email address. They know what the email address is, they know what their password is, so can begin to mount a known-plaintext attack against the data in the database.

Unless Adobe are using a different encryption key for every password in the database (unlikely as if they were this careful, they'd not encrypt them and instead hash and salt them) then discovering the key for one password will reveal the rest.

about 9 months ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Mitigating DoS Attacks On Home Network?

PhunkySchtuff You're probably not getting DDOS'd (319 comments)

You are probably either the victim of a malware infection, or you're torrenting too much. If a machine on your network has been properly pwned (and this is a lot more likely than you being the target of a DDOS) then running AV on top of the OS most likely won't find the malware...
Download and burn the Kaspersky Rescue CD, boot off that (a known-good OS) and scan your machines. Report back how much malware it found that everything else missed.
If you're participating in a DDOS (or otherwise maxing out your upstream bandwidth - eg torrents) then uploading at the maximum throughput will have the side effect of dropping your download speed to the same as your upload speed.

about 10 months ago
top

Two-Laser Boron Fusion Lights the Way To Radiation-Free Energy

PhunkySchtuff Re:New "traditional" energy source (140 comments)

There's one area where renewables can win out, and the space they take up doesn't make any difference.
If a law were to be passed where every new house had to have, say, a 5kW photovoltaic system on the roof, it would take up zero additional space, would be cheaper to implement at the design stage of a new house and all new houses would be largely self-sufficient for power, with the ability to feed extra power into the grid.
As a bonus, on those really hot (and, coincidentally, sunny) days where everyone has their AC on, they are the kinds of days where a distributed power generation system like this will easily be able to cope with the additional load.

about 10 months ago
top

Why Apple Went 64-Bit With the iPhone 5s

PhunkySchtuff Re:RISC (iPhone) vs. CISC (OSX) (512 comments)

Whilst the execution engine in an x86 chip may be RISC (or RISC-like) code running on the chip is well and truly CISC - programs running on x86 have no access to the low-level RISC features.

about a year ago
top

SSD Annual Failure Rates Around 1.5%, HDDs About 5%

PhunkySchtuff Re:Stay away from OCZ and SandForce (512 comments)

I can't verify the reasons you've given, but I can back up those failure rates.
When SSDs were still crazy expensive, OCZ were at the more affordable end of the range. It got to be that they failed so much whenever I put in an RMA for one with my supplier they wouldn't even ask for details or attempt to troubleshoot to verify the fault.
Me: "Hi, I've got an SSD for a warranty return"
Them: "OK, have you got the serial number or the original invoice?"
Me: "It's an OCZ"
Them: "Oh, no worries, we'll courier a new one out to you"

Since prices have dropped, I now only use Intel and have had a grand total of one failure, in a 4 year old 80GB disk.

about a year ago

Submissions

top

What are the implications of finding the Higgs Boson?

PhunkySchtuff PhunkySchtuff writes  |  about 2 years ago

PhunkySchtuff writes "OK, so we're all hearing the news that they've found the Higgs boson.
What are some of the more practical implications that are likely to come out of this discovery?
I realise it's hard to predict this stuff — who would have thought that shining a bright light on a rod of ruby crystal would have lead to digital music on CDs and being able to measure the distance to the moon to an accuracy of centimetres?
If the Higgs boson is the particle that gives other particles mass, would our being able to manipulate the Higgs lead to being able to do things with mass such as we can do with electromagnetism? Will we be able to shield or block the Higgs from interacting with other particles, leading to a reduction in mass (and therefore weight?) Are there other things that this discovery will lead to in the short to medium term?"
top

An open letter to Apple - Bring back the clones

PhunkySchtuff PhunkySchtuff writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PhunkySchtuff writes "Dear Apple, Please either do something with the Mac Pro range, or set it free. My proposal below will address not only this shortcoming but fix your problems with servers as well. Yes, hear me out for a minute, I know this burned you really really badly last time in the early 90's when Apple products were outrageously more expensive than the industry average and the clone makers brought in low quality, cheap hardware and tarnished things, but please, please, please look at licensing Mac OS X to certified clone makers. "But that's crazy talk" "Clones will be the death of the Apple experience" "Clones cheapen the experience" "Why would someone buy a Mac if a clone is cheaper?" "Why would Apple give up their famous margins on selling hardware?" A clone program could not only be successful, but would restore a lot of faith in the brand from the high-end of the professional and enterprise market if there is one VERY IMPORTANT restriction on clones... All Clones MUST HAVE A XEON PROCESSOR. That immediately rules out all the bottom-feeding, white-box making clone makers who just want to make the cheapest computer and damn the quality. Xeons are freakin' expensive chips, and the hardware to support them isn't cheap either. This would allow certified clone makers to make high-end machines that can dual-boot, yet not compete in Apple's core consumer markets which is dominated by portables. Try stuffing a Xeon in a laptop? No thanks, the only nuts I like dry-roasted are almonds. Go and look at a high-end HP workstation, something like a current generation Z800 — it's a Mac Pro in all but it's ability to run OS X. That would also solve the problem of a severe lack of enterprise-ready servers, that once again would not compete whatsoever with the Mac mini Server. It would be a win all around — Apple could (almost) charge whatever they like for an OS X licence. This would not lead to any more hacintoshes than already exist — people making a cheap-arse hacintosh will not be spending the coin to use a Xeon, it's going to be on a cheaper consumer-level platform. Professionals would have a machine that they could expand, would be updated on a regular basis with modern hardware specs and would not have to hassle the consumer-focussed Genius Bar for support on. Please Apple, if you love it, set it free."
top

Recommendations for a laptop with a keypad that doesn't suck

PhunkySchtuff PhunkySchtuff writes  |  more than 2 years ago

PhunkySchtuff writes "I'm seeking the collective's recommendations on a laptop with a numeric keypad that doesn't suck.

For practicality reasons, an external USB keypad is less convenient than a built-in one. A keypad is required for entry of lots of numbers, and using the alpha keys with the Fn key to turn them into a keypad is not acceptable.
Looking at the larger manufacturers, it seems that none of their business grade laptops (e.g. Lenovo's T-Series or similar quality levels) have numeric keypads. Looking at their laptops that do have keypads, invariably they are cheap, plastic and flimsy. Looking at Lenovo's offering with a Keypad, whilst it's a 15" screen, the vertical resolution is just 768 pixels, and the build quality of it leaves a lot to be desired.

I need to find something that is built to the quality of a "real" ThinkPad, or even a MacBook Pro, but has a full-sized keyboard with a numeric keypad and there doesn't seem to be anything like that on the market at the moment. This is a mystery to me as to why it would be the case as I'd imagine it's business users who need to use a keypad more than the average user, yet it is the consumer grade laptops that have keypads."
top

Why does the US cling to imperial measurements?

PhunkySchtuff PhunkySchtuff writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PhunkySchtuff writes "As one of only three countries on Earth that hasn't converted to a metric system of units and measurements, there is a huge amount of resistance within the US to change the status quo. Whilst the cost of switching would be huge, there is also a massive hidden cost in not switching when dealing with the rest of the world (except for Liberia & Burma, the only other two countries that don't use the metric system)

With one of the largest organisations in the US, the military, using metric units extensively, why does the general public in the US still cling to their customary system of units?"
top

End of the Road for Apple's Xserve

PhunkySchtuff PhunkySchtuff writes  |  more than 3 years ago

PhunkySchtuff writes "Apple announced recently that they are killing the Xserve.
In their Transition Guide, they mention the replacement options of the Mac Pro or the Mac mini with Snow Leopard Server as replacement options. Neither are anything like a direct replacement — the Mac Pro is considerably larger and uses more power (largely due to the more powerful graphics card as a standard configuration) and the Mac mini is a small and energy efficient workgroup server that can't handle anywhere near the same workload.

In the past few years, Apple have been making inroads into larger enterprise businesses, largely thanks to the success of the iPhone and the ever-growing range of software available (for instance, Autodesk have recently committed themselves to the Mac platform) and now there's no longer going to be a real enterprise server offering."

Link to Original Source
top

Recommendations for Firewall/VPN Appliances

PhunkySchtuff PhunkySchtuff writes  |  more than 4 years ago

PhunkySchtuff writes "I have been using SnapGear Firewall/VPN appliances from Secure Computing for many years now and have found them to be very good. They are linux based, are highly configurable yet have a straightforward and easy to use GUI and they play well with Linux and Macs.

As the link above points out, Secure Computing were purchased by McAfee a while back and as of July 2010, they will be discontinued. It's always very frustrating when something like this happens — small innovative company with a great product is purchased by a massive corporate, promises are made to continue their wonderful support and then most of their product lines end up End of Life'd while the one thing that the company was purchased for is rolled into another product line.

I'm putting it to the Slashdot crowd to recommend a suitable alternative and the requirements are: The product needs to be open, it needs to have good after-sales support. It needs to be easy to configure and this is very important as these units generally get configured once when they go in and then they often don't need to be touched for months or years and it's easy to forget the intricacies of a complex GUI. They need to have PPTP and IPSec VPN support for ad-hoc client connections as well as site to site connections, and once again this needs to be easy to configure."

Journals

PhunkySchtuff has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?
or Connect with...

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>