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Ask Slashdot: Best Software For Image Organization?

Pikoro Re:Google Picasa 3 (258 comments)

Under the Tools menu, there is an Experimental sub-menu. Select "Show duplicate files". Then I just deleted everything that shows up. Seems to work just fine. It's not automatic or anything, but it works.

3 days ago
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Attorney General Won't Force New York Times Reporter To Reveal Source

Pikoro Re:Justice in the U.S.A (55 comments)

Perhaps he was just burning CDs or DVDs.

5 days ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Pikoro Re:You use more power, & risk redirects too (687 comments)

So if you hit a site that has 5-10 of your "blocked" sites, you have to parse that file each time, for each query. Talk about a waste of resources.

Also, my DNS box is doing more than just serving up dns requests. You still haven't shown me any kind of benchmark. Only your made up numbers and statistics.

Come on... Step up. Show me a single study that compares a million+ line host file against a single dns query for the same item.

As for adding complexity... Yah, I guess it does add some. Things that someone that only knows how to parse a plain text file in notepad might not grasp...

Bring it on! Show me the study!

about two weeks ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Pikoro Re:You pile on more inefficiency (687 comments)

So your only comeback is that a DNS server uses more power? Really? Is that the best you got?

Still no response to #10. Come on buddy... show me the benchmarks. I want to see the speed difference between parsing a 1,000,000+ text file vs a single dns query.

Take your time.. I'll wait.

Are you sure you're not the lovechild of Bennett Haselton and the Timecube guy?

about two weeks ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Pikoro Re:Ask yourselves these questions... apk (687 comments)

1.) Secure you vs. known malicious sites/servers (beyond malicious adbanners - see 2 thru 6 below next)

2.) Secure you vs. downed DNS servers aiding reliability

I run my own DNS server.

3.) Secure you vs. DNS redirect poisoned dns servers

See the answer to 2 above

4.) Protect you vs. fastflux using botnet attacks and stop their communications back to their C&C servers

Yup. Don't install shit from unknown sources.

5.) Protect you vs. dynamic dns using botnet attacks and stop their communications back to their C&C servers

See Answer to #2 above.

6.) Protect you vs. domain generation algorithm using botnet attacks and stop their communications back to their C&C servers

Again, see #2

7.) Speed you up for websurfing not only by adblocking but also hardcoding favorite sites

Utterly stupid approach since every decent site used CDNs now.

8.) Get you past a dnsbl you may not agree with

See #2 above

9.) Keep you off dns request logs

See #2 above

10.) Do all of those things and block ads (better than adblock) more efficiently in cpu cycles and memory usage

Show me the benchmarks

11.) Work on ANY webbound application (think stand-alone email programs, for example).

See #2.

12.) Give you direct, easily notepad/texteditor controlled data for all of the above

Hmm. vi on my dns server seems to work fine.

13.) Block out trackers

See #2.

14.) Block spam mails sources

Don't sign up for stupid sites using real email addresses and/or use an email specifically for those sites and blackhole the resulting email.

15.) Block phishing mails sources

Have a little common sense and this isn't an issue.

Debating if I should paste this after every one of your spam posts...

about two weeks ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Pikoro Re:LOL Slashdot today (687 comments)

Don't worry. That checkbox doesn't do anything since Dice took over anyways.

about two weeks ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Pikoro Re:They can go bite a donkey (687 comments)

I think the problem that you're failing to recognize which the OP stated was that yes, I pointed my browser at a website. What I did not point my browser at is the 14 IFRAME ads and analytics hosted by 15 other 3rd party providers. If a site wants to serve ads, then they should do like I did when I was running a largish (over 1M unique users a day) website. Sell your own ad space. Ad networks who host obtrusive ads need to go away. Unobtrusive stuff like text ads or static stuff I don't really have a problem with.

Really slashdot? 3 minutes between comments, even on different threads?

about two weeks ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

Pikoro Re:AdBlock = Inferior + 'Souled-Out'... apk (687 comments)

Hey APK, what's your IP address so I can block all the spam you've been posting? I want to add it to my hosts file.

about two weeks ago
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Economist: US Congress Should Hack Digital Millennium Copyright Act

Pikoro Re:Already lost the "complete freedom" argument... (129 comments)

Anyone else remember when electronics came with circuit diagrams on the inside of the [easily] removable cover? Things didn't require special tools to work on and repair yourself. Oh, and you could actually BUY replacement parts instead of tossing the whole thing in the bin and getting a new one?

about two weeks ago
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Economist: US Congress Should Hack Digital Millennium Copyright Act

Pikoro Re:DMCA was always flawed ... (129 comments)

This is also why acoustic couplers were invented. Since anything plugged directly into the phone line was "against the law", hackers worked around it. You plugged your phone into the line, and the acoustic coupler into your computer/device, and you placed the telephone handset on the acoustic coupler. You were not actually plugging your device into the phone line, thereby bypassing the "law".

about two weeks ago
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Sony Employees Receive Email Threat From Hackers: 'Your Family Will Be In Danger'

Pikoro Re: This is asinine (184 comments)

I've found that you can safely replace the L or R sound when speaking Japanese, with a D sound and you'll be close enough.

about two weeks ago
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Comcast Forgets To Delete Revealing Note From Blog Post

Pikoro The Japanese Way (114 comments)

I actually prefer the way it happens in Japan.

Basically, a single company (NTT) has laid down the infrastructure to every neighborhood. Then, they basically open it up and make it available to anyone who wants to start an ISP. NTT, of course, offers their own ISP, but their ISP portion still has to lease the line from the parent company. Essentially, the ISP pays a set amount per customer that is signed up with the service for the rights to use the backbone. Then, the individual ISPs compete based on services offered. They also compete on price, but most of the prices are within a couple hundred yen of each other (couple dollars).

Each ISP hosts their own authentication servers, email, website, etc... The customer plugs in their username and password to the modem (user@ispname.ext). NTT runs the PPPoE server, but each ISP has their own RADIUS server. So NTT receives a login request from bob@fiber.marley.jp. NTT looks up fiber.marley.jp and makes sure it's a registered ISP. If it's ok, then NTT forwards the radius request to the fiber.marley.jp auth server hosted by the ISP which then authenticates the account and allows or disallows the connection. If the auth goes through, the user is allowed access to the network, ip address is assigned, routing is set to pass them their dns, gateway, etc...

Then you're on the backbone and you can do what you like.

Cool thing is, there's only one network to maintain/upgrade so when NTT upgrades from say, 100Mb/sec fiber to 1Gb/sec fiber, all the ISP has to do is set up a new service and subdomain for auth and the user can use the new service in the method described above..

You can also subscribe to regular phone service, tv service, and they also have a VOD service available.

Anyways, it's a good system and it works great. There's tons of competition and the backbone owner still gets a cut of every connection based on subscriber rates per ISP.

about two weeks ago
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Gilbert, AZ Censors Biology Books the Old-Fashioned Way

Pikoro Re:Baby meet bathwater (289 comments)

Which is also wrong. The "morning after" pill doesn't abort anything. It tells the body to stop ovulating "immediately" in order to avoid getting pregnant. If she's already ovulated before she takes the pill, it won't work, so it's no more an abortion pill than is aspirin.

about three weeks ago
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Firefox Will Soon Offer One-Click Buttons For Your Search Engines

Pikoro Re:What's next for Firefox? (101 comments)

And instead of an AC I was expecting a 4 digit UID :)

about three weeks ago
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The Downside to Low Gas Prices

Pikoro Re:Stupid, trucks cause the problem (554 comments)

Funny thing. In Japan they tax cars based on engine sizes. You have the minimally taxed "Kei" class cars (660cc and less), then you got the 500 plated cars (2000cc and less), then the cars with over 2000cc. They all pay a "road tax" every year based on that engine size. The bigger the car, the larger the tax. Makes sense to me.

about a month ago
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Study Shows Direct Brain Interface Between Humans

Pikoro Re: Don't we already do that? (110 comments)

You didn't see the movie "Brainstorm" did you?

about a month and a half ago
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Will HP's $200 Stream 11 Make People Forget About Chromebooks?

Pikoro Re: No (232 comments)

Chrome Remote Desktop. Full password protected access from anywhere in the world, even if she's NAT'd behind her router. Chrome Web Store

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Microsoft signs android patent deal with Foxconn

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Pikoro (844299) writes "Microsoft has secured a patent deal with the world's biggest consumer electronics manufacturer to receive fees for devices powered by Google's Android and Chrome operating systems.

Hon Hai — the parent company of Foxconn — said the deal would help prevent its clients being caught up in an ongoing intellectual property dispute.

Microsoft says that Google's code makes use of innovations it owns.

Google alleges its rival's claims are based on "bogus patents".

"The patents at issue cover a range of functionality embodied in Android devices that are essential to the user experience, including: natural ways of interacting with devices by tabbing through various screens to find the information they need; surfing the web more quickly, and interacting with documents and e-books.""
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Judge rules that resale of MP3s violates copyright law

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Pikoro (844299) writes "A judge has sided with Capitol Records in the lawsuit between the record company and ReDigi — ruling that MP3s can only be resold if granted permission by copyright owners.
"The Order is surprising in light of last month's United States Supreme Court decision in Kirtsaeng v. Wiley & Sons, which reaffirmed the importance and applicability of the First Sale Doctrine in the United States of America.""
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Raspberry Pi available for Sale 0600 GMT on Feb 29th

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Pikoro writes "Raspberry Pi has just sent out the following email notice to subscribed users:

The Raspberry Pi Foundation will be making a big (and very positive) announcement that just might interest you at 0600h GMT on Wednesday 29 February 2012. Come to www.raspberrypi.org to find out what's going on."
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Sony begins banning Jailbroken PS3s from PSN

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Pikoro (844299) writes "This morning, Sony started sending out emails to PSN subscribers which Sony has detected are running jailbroken Playstation 3 consoles.

From the email:
"A circumvention device and/or unauthorized or pirated software currently resides on your PlayStation(R)3 system.
Immediately cease use and remove all circumvention devices and delete all unauthorized or pirated software from your PlayStation(R)3 system. Failure to do so will result in termination of your access to the PlayStation(R)Network and access to Qriocity(TM) services through your PlayStation(R)3 system."

Time to leave your network cable unplugged if you have jailbroken your PS3."

Link to Original Source
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LINE: LINE Is Not an Emulator

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Pikoro writes "I'm curious. I have been using Linux since my first Slackware install (13 floppies back in the 286 days). I always see people trying to get Windows programs running under Linux using WINE. I've been wondering. Why all the time being spent trying to get Windows software running under Linux, when there is so much great Linux software out there that doesn't run under Windows? Why not a "LINE" project to help people port Linux software to windows? Or perhaps a Linux ELF compatibility layer so we can run Linux software on Windows, the same way we can run Windows software under Linux.

Update: I have just started the "LINE" (LINE Is Not an Emulator) project at http://www.linehq.org .

This will, of course, require community support, so I'm asking for help in all areas. Monitoring current porting efforts, creating an application compatibility layer to enable ELF and APP binaries to run under Windows, etc...

So I pose the question to the Linux community: Any interest in a GPL ELF application compatibility layer for Windows?"
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Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Pikoro writes "Matt over at embeddedether.net has a curious and slightly over-engineered project up at his site.
He has created a Mechanical hit counter for his website.
From the page:


I've always subscribed to the Rube Goldberg School of Engineering Design, the philosophy of which is "simple, elegant solutions are for the unimaginative". These are words I can live by.
Overengineered designs are where Art and Science meet, eye each other up a bit, sink a few pints, and head off to Science's apartment to see his etchings. I tip my hat to Mr. Goldberg, using a machine that tips hats in 22 steps, starting with cracking an egg.
Here, then, is my humble contribution to the rich tradition of overengineering — the Mechanical Hit Counter.
"
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Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Pikoro writes "I have been working in the IT field for the past 20 years or so, and after getting hired by the largest financial company in the world, I thought I might have finally found a place to retire from.

However, after working here for about 6 months, I find myself, not exactly burnt out, but longing for a complete career field change.

It's not that doing IT related tasks aren't fun anymore, but they have become more "work" than "play" over the last few years.

Since all of my experience has been IT related, I'm not sure where I could go from here.

What would slashdot readers consider doing for a living after being in a single field for so long?"

Journals

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Open Source Cola

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 7 years ago While Pepsi and Coca-Cola (and others) closely guard their secrets to making cola beverages, several organizations have released their own recipes.

At the link is the recipe for homemade "OpenCola," an open-source cola beverage that invites makers to create and modify their recipe to achieve a better beverage.

It is licensed under the GNU General Public License.

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Looking for slashdot user TakeyMcTaker

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 7 years ago

In my submission, Where to go after a lifetime of IT, a slashdot user posted a comment saying to ask for information about working in IT for the entertainment industry.

I posted a reply to the comment but the user never got back to me. TakeyMcTaker, if you're out there, please reply to this with any information you might have :) or email me: pikoro AT glbb.jp

Or, if anyone has any info on how to reach TakeyMcTaker, please drop me a line.

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Where to go after a life of IT work?

Pikoro Pikoro writes  |  more than 7 years ago

I have been working in the IT field for the past 20 years, and after getting hired by the largest financial company in the world, I thought I might have finally found a place to retire from.

However, after working here for less than 6 months, I find myself, not exactly burnt out, but longing for a complete career field change.

Since all of my experience has been IT related, I'm not sure where I could go from here.

What would slashdot readers consider doing for a living after being in a single field for so long?

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