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World Governments Object to New gTLDs like .wtf, .sucks, .baby, .amazon

Qedward Re:Saudi objections (3 comments)

Apologies about formatting, after bible should read .persiangulf and .gcc

about a year and a half ago
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World Governments Object to New gTLDs like .wtf, .sucks, .baby, .amazon

Qedward Saudi objections (3 comments)

I compiled a list in August for all of Saudi Arabia's objections. Begins with .tattoo which is "contrary to the culture, morality and religion of Islam and Judaism. The creation of a gTLD string which promotes tattooing will be offensive to these societies and cultures, representing billions of people worldwide."

Moves on to: .sucks .wine .style .bar .wtf .vodka .virgin .sexy .sex .pub .porn .poker .hot .dating .gay .casino .bar .baby .africamagic .adult .ummah .tatar .shia .ismaili .islam .imamat .halal .catholic .bible .persiangulf .gcc

There may be more, that anecdotal investigation was done on August 16.

about a year and a half ago
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Europe's Cyber Warriors Play War Games

Qedward Tic tac toe (1 comments)

Pretty sure Joshua would have any security agency, at least until noughts and crosses crops up.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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Why does Gartner think there's such a thing as a 'woman CIO'?

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 2 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Why did Gartner speak to 2,339 CIOs to find out men and women feel pretty much the same about cloud computing, mobility, analytics and overhauling ERP systems? The only thing Gartner reveals in its recent report, which you can buy for $495, is its own ingrained sexism. Researching whether a person's inherent womanliness means they're more likely to want to overhaul an ERP system is not a worthy line of study, in the same way that I would not bother to investigate whether black CIOs prioritise cloud computing to underpin their mobile strategy, or if gay CIOs like to focus on desktop virtualisation.

The CIO research focuses on the differences in budgets, priorities and agendas of male and female CIOs, breaking the shocking news that "our survey data is encouraging in that it shows many positive similarities between women and men in the CIO role".

That's because there's no such thing as a male or female CIO — there are just CIOs, some of whom have two X chromosomes, and some of whom just the one. Of course their priorities are the same, and if you think otherwise you're part of the problem."

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UK tax authority clarifies Bitcoin policy - VAT exempt for mining and exchange

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 5 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Exchanging or mining Bitcoins is exempt from value-added tax (VAT) in the UK, but accepting the virtual currency for goods and services is subject to it, HMRC said yesterday.

The guidance should give those handling bitcoins a bit more confidence about tax questions, as authorities around the world mull how the five-year-old virtual currency should be regulated.

HM Revenue & Customs described in a brief how it views Bitcoin in light of four taxes: VAT, corporation tax, income tax and capital gains tax.

While Bitcoin miners and those exchanging it for British pounds or foreign currency are exempt from VAT, people selling goods in exchange for virtual currencies are required to collect it. VAT is charged for most goods and services in at a rate of 20%.

When goods are sold for bitcoins, the amount of VAT to be paid will be calculated based on "the sterling value of the cryptocurrency at the point when the transaction takes place."

The guidance is murky on whether other activities involving Bitcoin are subject to corporation tax, income tax or capital gains tax. Like any other activity, the agency said, it "depends on the activities and the parties involved," and each case will be considered on its own."

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Ditch WhatsApp for more secure service, German privacy regulator urges

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 5 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "WhatsApp users should switch to a more secure messaging service now that it is being bought by Facebook, a German data protection commissioner urged.

Facebook announced yesterday that it plans to acquire WhatsApp, a mobile messaging service with about 450 million monthly users, for $12 billion in shares, $4 billion in cash as well as $3 billion in stock options.

The deal could raise important data protection issues because the personal data of its users will likely be merged with Facebook data, said Thilo Weichert, data protection commissioner for the German state of Schleswig-Holstein.

When communication metadata and content of both services is merged, it can be used for profiling and commercially exploited for advertising purposes, Weichert said."

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UK council to send obese people 'motivational' texts telling them to use stairs

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 6 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Stoke-on-Trent City Council is sending texts to obese people in the area to help motivate them to lose weight.

Examples of the texts sent include 'aim to eat a variety of fruit and vegetables each day', 'aim to eat regular meals and keep a check on snacks and drinks' and 'maybe walk to the shops or use the stairs more often'.

Over 100,000 people in the region are overweight or obese, the council said, and the texts are for those who are aged at least 18, have a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or over and who have proactively signed up to receive the motivational messages.

They will be sent daily texts, a weekly questionnaire and a follow-up questionnaire. A sample of 500 recipients will also have a telephone interview. All this, plus the licence for the tele-health text service is equal to £10,000. The costs of obesity for the local NHS in terms of increased levels of disability and disease are £50 million a year.

#idle"

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European Court of Human Rights fast-tracks UK government mass surveillance case

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 6 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "The European Court of Human Rights has fast-tracked a complaint alleging that the UK government illegally used internet and telecommunications networks to systematically spy on its citizens, privacy campaigners said.

In October, UK groups Big Brother Watch, Open Rights Group and English PEN together with the German internet campaigner Constanze Kurz filed a complaint with the human rights court to challenge the legality of internet surveillance programmes operated by UK intelligence agency GCHQ and recently revealed in documents leaked by Edward Snowden. The complaint cited the Prism program, developed by the US National Security Agency (NSA), and GCHQ's Tempora programme.

The groups claim that by collecting data on millions of people not under any suspicion, GCHQ has infringed on the privacy rights of not only British but also European citizens.

The court has completed its preliminary investigation and has decided to give priority to the application, it informed the campaigners in a letter dated January 9 and released by the campaigners."

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Japan to tax sales of content downloaded from abroad

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 6 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Japan is planning to tax sales of foreign online content such as e-books, apps and downloaded music by late 2015.

Japanese who purchase electronic content from foreign firms like Amazon.com through overseas servers don't have to pay consumption tax, currently at 5% but slated to rise to 8% in April. That has made foreign content cheaper than apps, MP3 downloads, software, and e-books distributed domestically.

Physical products purchased from abroad are hit with consumption tax when they clear customs in Japan, but no such levy exists for online goods.

The government plans to close the loophole and make foreign vendors selling consumer goods register with tax authorities and pay the tax. Japanese corporations that buy foreign electronic content such as business software, however, will have to pay the tax directly to the Japanese tax authorities, Nikkei Asian Review reported this morning."

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EU parliament says Prism part of US econ/polit espionage and not anti-terrorism

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 6 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "EU politicians said that they doubt data collection by the US National Security Agency has been purely for the fight against terrorism.

In a draft report from the European Parliament's civil liberties committee, published yesterday, members of the European Parliament (MEPs) say that it is "very doubtful that data collection of such magnitude is only guided by the fight against terrorism," and that there may be other motives such as political and economic espionage.

The document urges EU countries to take legal action against the breach of their sovereignty perpetrated through such mass surveillance programmes."

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Munich open source switch 'completed successfully'

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 7 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Munich's switch to open source software has been successfully completed, with the vast majority of the public administration's users now running its own version of Linux, city officials said today.

In one of the premier open source software deployments in Europe, the city migrated from Windows NT to LiMux, its own Linux distribution. LiMux incorporates a fully open source desktop infrastructure. The city also decided to use the Open Document Format (ODF) as a standard, instead of proprietary options.

Ten years after the decision to switch, the LiMux project will now go into regular operation, the Munich City council said."

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Self-driving cars to be on roads of Swedish capital Gothenburg by 2017

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 8 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Volvo is starting a pilot project that aims to have 100 self-driving cars on Swedish public roads around the city of Gothenburg by 2017.

The project is called "Drive Me" and is a joint initiative between the Volvo Car Group, the Swedish Transport Administration, the Swedish Transport Agency, Lindholmen Science Park and the City of Gothenburg, Volvo said Monday. Together they will make an effort to eliminate deadly car crashes in Sweden, said Erik Coelingh, technical specialist at Volvo Car Group.

In the next few years, Volvo will develop its Scalable Product Architecture (SPA) in its XC90 model. The goal is to have the first self-driving cars available to 100 consumers by 2017, Coelingh said. They will be able let their cars navigate about 50 typical commuter arteries that include motorway conditions and frequent traffic jams in and around Gothenburg, the country's second largest city."

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$630m 'Obamacare' Healthcare.gov site lacks most basic optimisation techniques

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 8 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "The problematic US Healthcare.gov website appears to fail the most fundamental of performance optimisation tests, an analysis has found.

Healthcare.gov, a key piece of the Affordable Care Act, often referred to as ‘Obamacare’, is a website from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that allows uninsured US citizens to shop for new health insurance plans. However, the $630 million website has been plagued with problems since its launch on 1 October 2013, including outages, slow page loads and users not being able to complete applications.

Over a month since the website’s launch, an analysis has found that standard website design optimisation practices, that have been around for years, have still not been applied. This leads to too much content being downloaded by the site, which continues to slow it down."

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British Army CIO - What it's like to be IT chief on the front line

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about 9 months ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "I’m stood in front of a bank of screens loaded with data as a team of professionals huddle around laptops and to my right a whiteboard depicts the storage area network in use. All of a sudden the sound of an explosion bursts around us, a man dives onto the floor, my sphincter clenches and I no doubt tremble a little; the CIO next to me doesn’t flinch. The screens we are looking at run footage from unmanned aircraft and display advanced 3D maps. The laptops are coated with a veneer of gritty dust while the professionals and the CIO are all in battle fatigues. This really is frontline information technology and Brigadier Alan Hill is the British Army’s deputy CIO."
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Glyn Moody on open source in China and UbuntuKylin

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Open enterprise blogger Glyn Moody is on the look-out for signs for the year of open source in China. He looks at the 'Open Source China — Open Source World Summit', the Chinese version of Ubuntu — UbuntuKylin — and why he expects a host of good, open source-based products to come from the country, in both mobile and desktop formats"
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Banks forgot to renew domain registrations, knocking services offline

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "National Australia Bank (NAB), the banking group that owns Clydesdale and Yorkshire banks in the UK, forgot to renew the domain name on its DNS servers, which took out online banking services for customers this weekend.

Computerworld UK can reveal that although the banks remembered to renew their UK domain names a month ago, the banking group didn’t renew its DNS domain name until after all services were knocked offline.

Nominet confirmed that cbonline.co.uk and ybonline.co.uk – the domain names for Clydesdale and Yorkshire banks – received a request for renewal on June 27 this year, which is reflected in the ‘last updated’ date on a domain registration website (screengrabs supplied)."

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UK government blocks 54 Gartner subscriptions costing £45,000 each

Qedward Qedward writes  |  1 year,6 days

Qedward (2499046) writes "Technology leaders in UK central government departments have been forced to put their Gartner subscriptions on hold as Whitehall aims to move to share resources centrally.

Sources told Computerworld UK that 54 subscriptions to the powerful IT analyst house, costing £45,000 each, have been blocked. Those spearheading the move said that some government IT organisations are still trying to place orders with Gartner, but these are being blocked by the Cabinet Office.

Each of the subscriptions equates to more than the cost of a child’s education at the prestigious Eton school for a year — a comparison made by those implementing the changes.

Earlier this month, some government CIOs were described as being "facility managers with a Gartner subscription spending billions" by the government CTO."

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Jon 'Maddog' Hall on Project Cauã and a server in every highrise

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Project Cauã, the Free and Open Source Software and Hardware (FOSSH) project conceived by Linux International executive director Jon “Maddog” Hall to make it possible for people to make a living as a systems administrator, is set to launch in Brazil next month.

The vision of Project Cauã is to promote more efficient computing following the thin client/server model, while creating up to two million privately-funded high-tech jobs in Brazil, and another three to four million in the rest of Latin America.

Hall explained that Sao Paolo in Brazil is the second largest city in the Western Hemisphere and has about twelve times the population density of New York City. As a result, there are a lot of people living and working in very tall buildings.

Project Cauã will aim to put a server system in the basement of all of these tall buildings and thin clients throughout the building, so that residents and businesses can run all of their data and applications remotely.

“In effect it’s kind of like creating a private cloud for every building,” Hall told Techworld."

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Berlin will not migrate to open source but looks to open standards

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Berlin will not migrate to open source software, but instead the parliament of the German city-state decided in principle to choose workplace IT based on open standards.

Berlin's Green party had proposed to have 25% of its standardised IT workplaces running open source software by 2018, according to the proposal that was voted down by the state parliament earlier this week.

It is the second time the opposition Greens had proposed switching Berlin's 68,000 workstations to open source software, and the second time they failed, said Thomas Birk, the party's spokesman for government modernization, on Wednesday. The earlier effort was in 2007.

Switching to open source can work, said Birk. By switching over 80% of its 15,500 desktops from Windows to its own Linux distribution, LiMux, and OpenOffice.org software, the city of Munich said it had saved over €11 million by November last year.

"Munich's example proves it is not witchcraft," to switch to open source, said Birk."

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EU Parliament committee votes against air passenger data sharing bill

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "European Union politicians are at loggerheads following a vote in the European Parliament yesterday that rejected proposals to store and share information on airline passengers.

The Parliament's civil liberties committee voted against plans to share between EU countries the PNR (passenger name register) data of airline passengers, including their name, contact details, payment data, itinerary, email and phone numbers.

PNR data is collected by airlines and a current agreement with the US uses information on passengers traveling between Europe and the US to target, identify and prevent potential terrorists and terrorist weapons from entering the US. The European Commission had proposed a similar scheme for passengers traveling within the EU."

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Could Margaret Thatcher have stopped Microsoft?

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Computerworld UK blogger John Spencer looks at computer science and IT in the UK education system, whose UK-centric approach came to an abrupt end in 1990 when Britain's only ever science-educated prime minister Maggie Thatcher lost power, coinciding with Microsoft's foray into UK schools with Windows 3.0. Microsoft then began its stranglehold, which was cemented under Tony Blair with the 1997 Memorandum of Understanding with MS."
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'Discrimination' over flexible working leaves lower-grade workers resentful

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes ""Digital discrimination" pervades the UK workplace, with senior management and higher social grades given more flexible working privileges and benefits in the workplace, provoking feelings of resentment and jealousy.

Following Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer's decision, for whatever reason, to ban flexible working, new research of 2,000 UK office workers found that 59% of the most senior management (social grade A) are allowed to work from home at least once a month, but the figure drops to 43% for middle management (social grade B), and only 26% for administrative staff and low-ranking professionals (C1).

The research found that 22% of administrative and lower-ranking professionals "felt jealous" about the situation, 16% were "resentful" and 16% were "annoyed"."

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Boeing 787s to create half a terabyte of data per flight

Qedward Qedward writes  |  about a year ago

Qedward (2499046) writes "Virgin Atlantic is preparing for a significant increase in data as it embraces the Internet of Things, with a new fleet of highly connected planes each expected to create over half a terabyte of data per flight.

IT director David Bulman said: "The latest planes we are getting, the Boeing 787s, are incredibly connected. Literally every piece of that plane has an internet connection, from the engines, to the flaps, to the landing gear.

"If there is a problem with one of the engines we will know before it lands to make sure that we have the parts there. It is getting to the point where each different part of the plane is telling us what it is doing as the flight is going on.

"We can get upwards of half a terabyte of data from a single flight from all of the different devices which are internet connected.""

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