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Banks Report Credit Card Breach At Home Depot

Ralph Wiggam Re:Chip and PIN (63 comments)

The deadline to switch is in 13 months. That kind of massive national transition is not easy or fast.

After next October, businesses will be able to use the old swipe and sign terminals, but they will be liable for any fraud instead of the credit card company. Obviously nobody wants that liability.

47 minutes ago
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New NRC Rule Supports Indefinite Storage of Nuclear Waste

Ralph Wiggam Re:Ridiculous (173 comments)

The state of Nevada is larger than the entire UK. You can't really grasp what real "empty space" looks like until you drive through the desert out here.

5 days ago
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New NRC Rule Supports Indefinite Storage of Nuclear Waste

Ralph Wiggam Re:central storage or n^x security guard costs / s (173 comments)

Ronald Reagan's NRC appointees approved zero new reactors. George HW Bush's NRC approved zero. Clinton's NRC approved zero. George W Bush's NRC approved zero new nuclear reactors.

Obama's NRC has approved 4 new reactors. They can't be all that anti-nuclear.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/first-new-nuclear-reactor-in-us-since-1978-approved/

5 days ago
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New NRC Rule Supports Indefinite Storage of Nuclear Waste

Ralph Wiggam Re:Ridiculous (173 comments)

Let's blame the people responsible- Nevada voters. The politicians are just representing their constituents. I supported the Yucca Mountain project before I moved to Nevada and I would be an asshole to change my opinion afterward.

The proposed site is over 100 miles from Vegas in the absolute middle of nowhere. Even if they stored the waste in a big open pit above ground, it still wouldn't affect anyone.

But people here are terrified about transporting the waste along the rail lines through town. There is a freight train that goes literally 100 feet from my office every day with tanker cars full of ammonia and sodium hydroxide. Nobody bats an eye.

5 days ago
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Uber Has a Playbook For Sabotaging Lyft, Says Report

Ralph Wiggam Re:How is this not conspiracy to commit fraud? (182 comments)

The root post was about criminal charges.

I'm sure a civil case is in the works. I don't envy any of the lawyers involved. It will be a tough case.

about a week ago
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Uber Has a Playbook For Sabotaging Lyft, Says Report

Ralph Wiggam Re:How is this not conspiracy to commit fraud? (182 comments)

Nobody is directly profiting from these actions. I think proving a fraud charge would be pretty tough.

And it's not theft of services because they're not actually getting any service.

And as much as we wish it was, "being a dick" is not illegal.

about a week ago
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California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

Ralph Wiggam Re:Not surprising (506 comments)

It's nice to see that somebody gets it.

about a week ago
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California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

Ralph Wiggam Re:Not surprising (506 comments)

Screwed up my first reply.

I can hold the brakes at a stop and floor the throttle, and cut the back tires loose.

But the car doesn't move, right? And you're using this anecdote to *disagree* with my post?

Let's see what Car and Driver says on the topic-

With the Camry’s throttle pinned while going 70 mph, the brakes easily overcame all 268 horsepower straining against them and stopped the car in 190 feet—that’s a foot shorter than the performance of a Ford Taurus without any gas-pedal problems and just 16 feet longer than with the Camry’s throttle closed. From 100 mph, the stopping-distance differential was 88 feet—noticeable to be sure, but the car still slowed enthusiastically enough to impart a feeling of confidence. We also tried one go-for-broke run at 120 mph, and, even then, the car quickly decelerated to about 10 mph before the brakes got excessively hot and the car refused to decelerate any further. So even in the most extreme case, it should be possible to get a car’s speed down to a point where a resulting accident should be a low-speed and relatively minor event. ....

We included the powerful Roush Mustang to test—in the extreme—the theory that “brakes are stronger than the engine.” From 70 mph, the Roush’s brakes were still resolutely king even though a pinned throttle added 80 feet to its stopping distance. However, from 100 mph, it wasn’t clear from behind the wheel that the Mustang was going to stop. But after 903 feet—almost three times longer than normal—the 540-hp supercharged Roush finally did succumb, chugging to a stop in a puff of brake smoke.

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/how-to-deal-with-unintended-acceleration

about a week ago
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California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

Ralph Wiggam Re:Not surprising (506 comments)

But the car doesn't move, right? And you're using this anecdote to *disagree* with my post?

Let's see what Car and Driver says on the topic-

With the Camry’s throttle pinned while going 70 mph, the brakes easily overcame all 268 horsepower straining against them and stopped the car in 190 feet—that’s a foot shorter than the performance of a Ford Taurus without any gas-pedal problems and just 16 feet longer than with the Camry’s throttle closed. From 100 mph, the stopping-distance differential was 88 feet—noticeable to be sure, but the car still slowed enthusiastically enough to impart a feeling of confidence. We also tried one go-for-broke run at 120 mph, and, even then, the car quickly decelerated to about 10 mph before the brakes got excessively hot and the car refused to decelerate any further. So even in the most extreme case, it should be possible to get a car’s speed down to a point where a resulting accident should be a low-speed and relatively minor event. ....
We included the powerful Roush Mustang to test—in the extreme—the theory that “brakes are stronger than the engine.” From 70 mph, the Roush’s brakes were still resolutely king even though a pinned throttle added 80 feet to its stopping distance. However, from 100 mph, it wasn’t clear from behind the wheel that the Mustang was going to stop. But after 903 feet—almost three times longer than normal—the 540-hp supercharged Roush finally did succumb, chugging to a stop in a puff of brake smoke.

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/how-to-deal-with-unintended-acceleration

about a week ago
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California DMV Told Google Cars Still Need Steering Wheels

Ralph Wiggam Re:Not surprising (506 comments)

or at least allow for an emergency override that interrupts the computer entirely if the main 'stop the car now' brake fails to work properly.

That's called an "emergency brake". We've had them for a while. Even if the computer has completely crashed and the throttle is wide open, that handle can manually closes the brakes and stop the car. Even in a muscle car, the brakes are more powerful than the engine.

about a week ago
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Securing the US Electrical Grid

Ralph Wiggam Re:Great way to waste your money (117 comments)

The US military has a bomb designed to be used against transformer stations. Instead of explosives, the case is packed with spools of thin strips of aluminum foil.

It makes it look like the place was vandalized by teenagers, using foil instead of toilet paper.

about a week ago
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Numerous Methane Leaks Found On Atlantic Sea Floor

Ralph Wiggam Re:Feedback loops (273 comments)

To your specific point, we even have several historical examples in the ice records of (geologically) sudden 'pulses' in CO2 and temperature to levels comparable or exceeding today.* In every case the system has then returned to an equilibrium....DOZENS of times over the past couple of million years. The feedback loops you talk about are real; the cataclysmic FUD you're talking about negative feedback is, quite evidently, not.

The Earth will definitely return to equilibrium and the biosphere will certainly continue to exist.

The piece you're missing is that I'm a human. I care about human stuff that happens on human time scales.

"So maybe the global economy collapses and a couple billion people starve to death, but just give it 10,000 years and things will straighten themselves right out."

about a week ago
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Numerous Methane Leaks Found On Atlantic Sea Floor

Ralph Wiggam Re:Feedback loops (273 comments)

As the other reply points out- there are negative influences that do check the process and prevent the Earth from becoming Venus.

Unfortunately for us, they take hundreds of thousands of years to happen.

about a week ago
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Numerous Methane Leaks Found On Atlantic Sea Floor

Ralph Wiggam Re:Feedback loops (273 comments)

OK. I was focusing on human-scale time periods. Geological-scale is indeed different.

about a week ago
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Numerous Methane Leaks Found On Atlantic Sea Floor

Ralph Wiggam Re:I doubt it even makes it to the atmosphere (273 comments)

From TFA-

"Even in the more likely event that aerobic microbes devour the methane while still in the ocean, it is converted to carbon dioxide, which leads to ocean acidification."

about a week ago
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Numerous Methane Leaks Found On Atlantic Sea Floor

Ralph Wiggam Feedback loops (273 comments)

Nature usually creates negative feedback loops that contribute to equilibrium. The textbook one is if there is population growth in a prey species, the population of predators will increase to check that growth.

In this case we have a positive feedback loop. Increases in temperature will cause more methane hydrate to melt, which causes an increase in temperature.

This is a very not good situation that does not have easy solutions.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Where Can I Find Good Replacement Batteries?

Ralph Wiggam Re:Why not rebuild if possible? (131 comments)

Phone batteries for $10? Not likely a genuine retail OEM battery...they'll probably come in some rip off packaging with a clone board (this is a giant red flag...if they don't come in retail looking packaging from your phone's manufacturer, it's a scam

I was talking about phone batteries. Obviously laptop batteries are different.

Calling knock off phone batteries a "scam" is a huge stretch. I've bought probably 8 pairs of knock off batteries from Amazon over the past 5 years. 1 of those sets was garbage. 2 were mediocre, probably 60%-80% capacity of the OEM version. And 5 were perfectly fine, at least 80% of the capacity of the original. Considering that they cost about a fifth of the price of the originals, I am happy to accept that.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Where Can I Find Good Replacement Batteries?

Ralph Wiggam Re:Why not rebuild if possible? (131 comments)

How much does that cost? Considering a new one is often $10, that cannot be cost effective.

about two weeks ago

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