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Comments

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How Elon Musk Approaches IT At Tesla

Red Flayer Re:I keep warning you and you keep laughing... (231 comments)

You're referencing a character who first appeared on the Simpsons in the 90s... before SAP software as a class even existed.

What? ERP systems have been around since the 70s... SAP released R/2 in '79. If you're talking about R/3 (when they introduced server-client architecture), it was released in 1992.

about a year ago
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20-Somethings Think It's OK To Text and Answer Calls In Business Meetings

Red Flayer Re:Depends on the business (453 comments)

Today, you usually know who's calling before you answer. It may be appropriate to take a call if it's more important than the meeting. If you're in sales, a call from a major customer is probably more important than a meeting.

Sure, but not in the meeting. Excuse yourself, and explain it's an extremely important customer call that absolutely cannot wait.

And even if this is the case, you're still being rude... just with an excuse. The call may be more important to you, but the other people in the meeting? You're wasting their time.

If you've blocked out time for a meeting, don't take calls during that time. It's rude and unprofessional.

Note: This is for orgs that have effective meetings. If your meetings are generally unproductive, it may be a different story...

about a year ago
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20-Somethings Think It's OK To Text and Answer Calls In Business Meetings

Red Flayer Is this a surprise? (453 comments)

Part of the list of things I go over with my new hires is basic business etiquette. I spend at least an hour per employee on it. The most annoying thing I find is people who have a mother/father/significant other who expect them to always answer the cell phone when they call it. My experience is that a lot of people we hire have never worked in a professional atmosphere before... I'm not sure if this is because of our hiring practices, or is because of the general habits of today's younger workforce. If I am in a meeting I scheduled, and someone my rank or lower answers their phone, I almost always immediately end the meeting, to be rescheduled later. I run meetings so as to waste the minimum amount of time required for everyone; I expect the same from others. The public shaming seems to work well at my current workplace.

about a year ago
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X.Org Foundation Loses 501(c)3 Non-Profit Status

Red Flayer Re:They could kepe (208 comments)

Sure they are, but that doesn't stop 90% of people from filing on time, or at least filing for the automatic extension. For that matter, nearly every church in the country manages to do the same.

Actually, churches are an exception. Churches that have been granted 501(c)3 status as a church under 170(b)(1)(A)(i) are not required to file information returns with the IRS. They get special treatment.

about a year ago
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Gore's Staff Says He Was Misquoted On Hexametric Hurricanes

Red Flayer Re:Two peas in a pod (216 comments)

Taking a two-decade-old trend is not cherry-picking.

It can be cherrypicking when there are cyclical trends whose period is longer than 20 years.

about a year ago
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Massachusetts Enacts 6.25% Sales Tax On "Prewritten" Software Consulting

Red Flayer Re:Wow (364 comments)

I didn't make any kind of judgment about the assumptions, sorry if you took it the wrong way.

It was a feeble attempt at a joke, playing on the multiple meanings of "pass". I guess it wasn't obvious enough.

about a year ago
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Massachusetts Enacts 6.25% Sales Tax On "Prewritten" Software Consulting

Red Flayer Re:Wow (364 comments)

Hammurabi, benevolent as he may have been, didn't have to "pass" anything. He simply decreed it.

Assumption 1: Hammurabi was personally responsible for all laws under his reign
Assumption 2: Taxes singling out specific types of businesses are shit.

Reasonable Conclusion: Hammurabi did, indeed, "pass" that tax specifically targeting breweries.

about a year ago
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FCC Rural Phone Subsidies Reach As High As $3,000 Per Line

Red Flayer Re:The urban poor subsidized the rich for a while (372 comments)

But still... you are talking about an issue you specifically said you haven't researched, and giving assertions as fact.

This is not a good way for anyone to approach and address arguments, or have any kind of informed discussion

about a year ago
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FCC Rural Phone Subsidies Reach As High As $3,000 Per Line

Red Flayer Re: The urban poor subsidized the rich for a while (372 comments)

Also, per the second reference, the top 10% of the US pays more than 60% of the TOTAL tax income.

So? They control 77% of wealth in the US, and it's going up. Source: http://www2.ucsc.edu/whorulesamerica/power/wealth.html

Unless we want wealth (and ultimately, political power) to ultimately concentrate in the top few percent of people, we need to maintain a progressive tax rate to maintain any semblance of democratic society.

about a year ago
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FCC Rural Phone Subsidies Reach As High As $3,000 Per Line

Red Flayer Re: The urban poor subsidized the rich for a while (372 comments)

Emphasis mine:

Capital gains, when applied to stock market gains, means that a company's worth has increased by making more money, on which the company has been taxed.

That is not necessarily the case. There are innumerable examples of companies whose stock price has gone up even though there has not been a comparable increase taxable corporate income. Stock price depends on a lot of factors, and taxed profits are but one small part.

If you were limiting discussion to dividend income, I could see your point, although I disagree with it... but it is clear from what you wrote that dividends are not what you're talking about.

about a year ago
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FCC Rural Phone Subsidies Reach As High As $3,000 Per Line

Red Flayer Re:The urban poor subsidized the rich for a while (372 comments)

If you think that a large percentage of urban development isn't subsidized as much if not more than rural development, you're either naive or stupid.

Source, please?

Are you saying that rural areas subsidize development in urban areas?

Or are you simply stating that urban areas subsidize their own development, which would hardly be relevant to the argument?

about a year ago
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FCC Rural Phone Subsidies Reach As High As $3,000 Per Line

Red Flayer Re:The urban poor subsidized the rich for a while (372 comments)

I think you'll find that when it comes to conflicts between people who produce food, and wealthy concentrations of people and power,

But... in the US... the people who produce the food ARE a place where wealth and power is concentrated. We romanticize the small family farm, but that's not where most of our food comes from.

about a year ago
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FCC Rural Phone Subsidies Reach As High As $3,000 Per Line

Red Flayer Re:The urban poor subsidized the rich for a while (372 comments)

Emphasis mine:

That being said, I am not convinced that it was a good idea in the first place and lean towards getting rid of it now. I haven't studied the issue

So why are you even talking about it?

This particular subsidy was created because it was recognized that the utility of the telephone system was much greater if just about everyone had one than if there were vast areas where no one had telephone service.

Source, please? If you haven't studied the issue, then don't give speculation as assertion.

Despite your claim, the Telecommunications Act of 1996 explicitly states,

To advance the availability of such services to all consumers, including those in low income, rural, insular, and high cost areas, at rates that are reasonably comparable to those charged in urban areas

Seems to me the point is to ensure remote people get access, not to make the system have a higher utility overall.

about a year ago
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D.C. Awards Obamacare IT Work To Offshore Outsourcer

Red Flayer Re: Why? (402 comments)

I know some great offshore developers, and I also know some American developers that aren't worth their salt. Each assessment needs to be made at a personal level; you can't make a valid blanket stereotyped claim that fits everyone.

I'm in finance, not development. But my experience is that you get what you pay for. Good finance people in India are only slightly cheaper than here in the US; add in the off-shoring complications, it's a losing prospect. We save money on drone jobs, but that's about it.

about a year ago
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D.C. Awards Obamacare IT Work To Offshore Outsourcer

Red Flayer Re:Yet another great argument... (402 comments)

That's a really good point.

I have nothing to add to it, but since I don't get mod points after an argument with Pudge a few years ago... I just wanted to call attention to your post.

about a year ago
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D.C. Awards Obamacare IT Work To Offshore Outsourcer

Red Flayer Re:Yet another great argument... (402 comments)

I agree, but...

Don't forget the abundant inflow of cheap labor!

about a year ago
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D.C. Awards Obamacare IT Work To Offshore Outsourcer

Red Flayer Re:Yet another great argument... (402 comments)

Emphasis yours:

I don't know what country you live in, but in this country, the average salary is over $50,000/yr. That's ample to buy a house in most communities.

To put it another way, you are full of shit.

What country are you in that has an average salary of over $50,000/yr? I assume you are referring to National Account wages, not some other methodology that is known to overstate wages... And using NA methodology, *average* wages in the US are $42k. And why are you referring to average instead of median, which would be more appropriate, since salaries are not a normal distribution? US median wage, for only those 24-69 (the highest earning group, by the way), including only full-time workers, is under $40k.

$40k salary is not enough to afford an average home ($272,900 as per US Census data, 2011).

Speaking of "full of shit" -- if that applies to anyone in this discussion, that person is you.

about a year ago
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D.C. Awards Obamacare IT Work To Offshore Outsourcer

Red Flayer Re:Yet another great argument... (402 comments)

Both your examples are of technologies that were emergent during the times you reference, and as such are not useful for comparison. They are red herrings. We could look, for example, at food prices. Or fuel prices. Or housing.

You should know that real wages have fallen since 1980. Food, housing, fuel -- these are all more expensive relative to wages today than they were in 1980. You try to explain it away by comparing some consumer goods, but that doesn't prove your point.

The divide of riches in terms of money may be growing slightly, but the divide between low wealth and high wealth certainly is not, it's very much shrinking.

That's laughable. High wealth has skyrocketed. Sure, low-wealth individuals now encompass most of the middle class (because the middle class doesn't accumulate wealth anymore), but working-age people with $2 million in assets live a far different lifestyle than those with no assets.

about a year ago
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D.C. Awards Obamacare IT Work To Offshore Outsourcer

Red Flayer Re:Yet another great argument... (402 comments)

(Emphasis mine):

The US has the most progressive tax system in the world (when all taxation is taken into account), yet income disparity seems to be positively correlated to the amount of progressiveness in taxation.

That is a gross misstatement. Income inequality (as per Mankiw et al) in the US is driven by lower redistribution than in other OECD countries. In no way is there a positive correlation between "amount of progressiveness in taxation" and income disparity in OECD countries.

If you stand by your outrageous statement, please provide evidence... I'm assuming you have none (hence the weasel word, "seems").

about a year ago
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Obama Reveals Climate Change Plan

Red Flayer Re:When is "not enough" still good enough? (577 comments)

Using a US football analogy, we can't always make a touchdown with every effort isn't a heroic 9-yard run a good start? Being any more ambitious with the President's plan would risk all-out resistance from every billion-dollar lobby and politician.

Except US politics is not American football. You get your 9-yard run, then your team doesn't bother snapping the ball again. "We accomplished this!" they exclaim in their bid to get re-elected. And that's all they're after, a feather for their environmentalist cap.

Congress won't take up legislation on an issue they already "decided on". The marginal political benefit of considering additional pieces of legislation along the same lines is minimal. They'd rather take up a bill on an unrelated topic, so they can crow about some other meaningless "achievement" to attract single-issue voters.

This is the reward we get for having a two-party system wherein we vote for the lesser of two weevils.

about a year ago

Submissions

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When comets attack

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Red Flayer (890720) writes "Popular Mechanics is running a story that describes one of the more interesting explanations for the Tunguska explosion of 1908:

Now, a controversial new scientific study suggests that a chunk of a comet caused the 5-10 megaton fireball, bouncing off the atmosphere and back into orbit around the sun. The scientists have even identified a candidate Tunguska object--now more than 100 million miles away--that will pass close to Earth again in 2045. Is there a hidden, but powerful, danger inside the seemingly harmless comet?

Please note that Popular Mechanics definition of "close to" is something different that most people's. At any rate, the key to this theory is that hydrogen and oxygen in the ice shard exploded upon entering the atmoshphere, resulting in the difficult-to-explain explosion pattern (previous theories contend that the object must have "skipped" on the atmosphere and then re-entered at the exact same spot). This would also sadly dash the theory that Nikola Tesla was responsible."
Link to Original Source

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Microsoft makes bid for Yahoo

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Red Flayer writes "It appears that Microsoft has rediscovered that the best way to do something is to find a company that already does that thing, and buy that company. Despite Microsoft's insistence that their search function is great, CNN Money is reporting that Microsoft has made a bid for Yahoo in the amount of US$46 Billion. This offer represents a premium of about 60% over what Yahoo shares were worth Thursday, and comes on the heels of the announcement that Yahoo will be laying off a thousand employees in the next month due to "headwinds" Yahoo will be facing in the coming year. Interestingly, though Yahoo futures shot up prior to the market opening Friday morning, Microsoft futures took a slight tumble (about 5%). So is Microsoft just looking to narrow the field of competitors, do they see real value in Yahoo's IP and/or client base, or both?"
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Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Red Flayer writes "Following yesterday's WTO formal adoption of the ruling that the US Law to restrict offshore online gambling is illegal:

The tiny Caribbean nation of Antigua and Barbuda seeks compensation from the U.S. over its illegal restrictions on Internet gambling sites based overseas and on Tuesday asked other countries to join in as it targets Washington over its failure to comply with global trade rules.

Antigua, the smallest country to successfully litigate a case in the World Trade Organization's 12-year-history, also threatened to target American trademarks, copyrights and telecommunications companies after the WTO on Tuesday formally adopted a landmark decision reached in March that the United States' restrictions on online gambling were illegal.
>See the article from November on this topic for previous discussion."
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Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Red Flayer writes "National Geographic has an article up about an unprecedentedly bright supernova. David Pooley (of UCal Berkeley), one of the coauthors of the study referenced by the article, has stated that the likely source of the light is from materia ejected into space, which has been theorized for supermassive stars, but never observed. FTA:

The finding has ramifications for Eta Carinae, the most massive star in our galaxy, which lies just 7,400 light years away. This star, estimated to be 100 to 120 times the sun's mass, has been experiencing preliminary eruptions that could mean it will explode in a manner similar to SN 2006gy.

The results of the study by Smith and Pooley will be published in an upcoming issue of Astrophysical Journal."
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Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Red Flayer writes "PCWorld reports that Microsoft has announced its intentions to make a $3 suite of products available to students in developing nations.

More information about the Student Innovation Suite can be found on Microsoft's Web site. The low-priced software suite is part of Microsoft's Partners in Learning program, a five-year, $250 million plan to help educators distribute software and training to students.
Altruism, you might ask?

"You'll find that Microsoft would be fairly open if pushed that they don't go into a market for philanthropic reasons," said Clive Longbottom, founder and analyst of Quocirca, a technology research firm in London. He said Microsoft has to find more creative ways to distribute its software in emerging markets where open-source software and Linux have a foothold.
I guess this will help partly replace the wink-wink-nudge-nudge policy regarding piracy of Microsoft Products in developing nations."
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Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Red Flayer (890720) writes "CNN reports that Urban Aeronautics (homepage) is coming along in the development of a flying car usable in urban environments. This small VTOL craft with encased rotors holds promise for urban search and rescue, utility work, and, of course, executive transport0. Mainstream adoption? Not likely, according to this 2003 article — and that is without consideration of the estimated US$ 1.5 million price tag."
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Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Red Flayer writes "Slate Magazine reports that the US's recent actions to clarify restrictions of on-line gambling may have some very important unintended consequences. Antigua has challenged the legitimacy of the US's partial restrictions under the WTO, claiming that the laws represent a free trade infringement. What is so significant about this is that Antigua would be fully justified (and I imagine, would get a lot of support from other nations) in ignoring the US's patent and trademark laws. Freetrade.org has a more in-depth analysis (albeit with a predetermined opinion on the topic). Pre-register now for your copy of Antiguasoft Vista."
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Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 8 years ago

Red Flayer writes "Like almost every Slashdotter, I'm often asked to help with problems friends, family, and acquaintances have with their computers. Almost always, these users have an infected windows box that needs to be cleaned (sometimes rebuilt). I hate leaving people in the lurch, but no one has the time to help everyone. Also, a lot of the users are not very computer literate — I have a hard time explaining important concepts to them when we don't share a vocabulary.

What I'd like to do is create a one-page 'manual' I can laminate and give to people requesting help, to get them started on the path to clean browsing. I figure several Slashdot users have already done something similar, so I thought I'd give a holler and see what's out there.

The requirements:

(1) Must define malware.
(2) Must describe how malware is typically acquired.
(3) Must *clearly* describe basic hard drive cleansing (running AV/AS software, where to acquire it)
(4) Must *clearly* describe forbidden activities.

Typically, the people who ask me for support out of the blue think that AOL is 'the internet' or some such nonsense — so I'm dealing with less-than-competent users, for whom a one-sheet reference could make a big difference."

Journals

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Who are these people ony my fans list?

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 3 years ago I was reading a journal by Shadow Wrought re: hitting the max number of friends, and having to delete old friends to make room for new ones.

In some respects, I do this in real life too. But that's beside the point and is best left for a different journal entry.

So anyway, I decided to take a look at my friends, fans, foes, and freaks lists and see if I could identify any of the people listed, if I could recall _anything_ about them. I think I hit around 80% on my friends and foes and freaks lists, and maybe 20% on my fans list. I'm not sure if that says something about me, or even if it says anything at all.

But every once in a while when I look at my fans list, I'm haunted by a single fan -- ^Z. There in my fans list -- the very last fan -- I see that his or her last journal was in the very early morning on Sept 11, 2001.

I worked in downtown Manhattan at the time, and lived across the river in Hoboken. I lost several acquaintances on that day, and one close friend. Was ^Z one of them*? Was ^Z some other person who lost their life that day? Or perhaps someone who gained some perspective, and realized slashdot is insignificant to them in the grand scheme of things?

Every time I look at my fans list, I'm reminded of that day and the people whose lives were lost. And I wonder how that day changed America, made us a nation of line-toers and protofascists, instead of making us celebrate and honor our freedoms even more. Was it a failure of our leadership? A failure of our modern culture?

And then, today, for the first time, I actually clicked on ^Z's profile, and I see that he or she kept on posting until sometime in 2009, and I realize I'm a sentimental, navel-gazing, analytical fool who lets himself get swept up in revery based on a false premise.

*Probably not, since he journaled in a different alphabet than the one I use.

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More dishonesty from Pudge -- proven

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 4 years ago Pudge has apparently been cured of last-post-itis, at least temporarily.

I stated that Pudge claims someone is lying because he disagrees with them on a matter of opinion. He, of course, claimed I was lying, and that he does no such thing -- multiple times. I then trapped him in his lie by providing incontrovertible evidence that he does, in fact, do what I claim he did.

Here's the post where it happened.

I'm waiting on a response from him (of course, he claimed he wouldn't respond to any more posts of mine because I was lying -- let's see if he changes his tune because I proved that I was telling the truth).

And Pudge, if you happen to read this journal entry, please go ahead and comment freely. Feel free to crapflood it if you like, since you have no forced waiting periods on posts. Unlike those who are afraid of having their lies and inconsistencies pointed out, I let my foes and freaks post in my journal. I'm curious to see how you might try to explain the fact that you indeed falsely accused me of lying, and lied yourself in the process.

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Notes to self re: slashdot conversations

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 4 years ago Well, it's happened again. I let myself get caught up in another "debate" with someone who has last-word-itis.

This time, it was Pudge. I've got to remember to stop reading his comments... they're infuriating, because he sometimes make good points, but tends to imply or assume invalid statements to lead to his insight. And heaven forbid that you call him out on his assumptions, or you'll spend the better part of two days' free time going back and forth while he makes sure that he can out-endure you for last post status (if you have the last post, apparently you win the discussion!).

Well, now I've finally gotten around to marking him as a foe, so I'll have a nice clear visual reminder not to get involved in a time-wasting discussion with him.

It just bothers me that, as a slashdot editor, he's got some additional weight to what he says... he gets upmodded a lot for very questionable posts. And if you disagree with him, it tends to be an automatic down-mod (not sure how that happens, I know a lot of the fundie capitalists/anarchists on slashdot have mod points, too), no matter how well-written or polite the response is.

But, no matter... maybe if I find myself in another discussion with him, I'll troll him with facts and just take satisfaction in his apoplexy.

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Googol the Destroyer weekly episode delayed

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 5 years ago So time is running out for me to post the third episode of Googol the Destroyer this week. I know I'd promised yesterday or today, but I did not finish the episode until last night... and today there have been no MS, Google, or Stallman articles relevant enough for me to work into the plot. Wish I had it ready to go yesterday, there were a couple.

I'll be offline tomorrow through Sunday, so it looks like Episode 3 will need to wait until next week. Sorry.

I know there's quite a bit of hubris in me making this post in my journal, but a few people did ask when it would be published :)

Just be aware that in Episode 3 we'll find out what Stallmanx has been working on in his secret laboratory, and we'll get a big clue towards what lies beneath his Beard of Druidic Prowess.

At any rate, I'm always happy to get feedback on the serial, tips, ideas, etc. It's a 12-episode arc so far, might be longer if I need to work in new plotlines based on relevant articles, or if I come up with something great.

I'll be republishing on a blog site somewhere after an extensive rewrites of each episode, probably on a six-week delay. Can anyone recommend a good blog site? (Preferably one with revenue sharing :) )?

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Need some reading suggestions -- PC history

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 5 years ago So, due to this post, or rather the inspiration for that post, I've decided that I should resume writing regularly.

I've been pretty busy for a couple years (having a kid will do that), and I've had a dearth of ideas and inspiration, until now.

We've all seen the humorous portrayals of the cult of Jobs, but I think this is an idea that can be expanded and fleshed out into several novels based on the history of PCs in the US. The key would be in working out how computing could be transformed into some kind of karmic or religious power while maintaining the key factors that led them to develop as they did.

So now I've got to get my nose into research, and begin reading (and re-reading) everything I can about the early years of PCs... I've got a list I'll be tackling shortly, but anyone have any suggestions? I'm particularly interested in the individuals involved.

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Another quarter gone by

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  about 6 years ago Well, another quarter has passed on by, and the world looks much the same as it did three months ago. There were some notable events that will stick with me for a while.

The Olympics in China -- awesome presentation, marred only by a few technical glitches. More confirmation of the fact that the IOC has no balls, not calling China out on the Mystery of the Underaged Gymnasts (maybe the Hardy Boys will get on the case). Michael Phelps was phenomenal, but for some reason he rubs me the wrong way... he doesn't act like a hero should act, and that bothers me subconsciously. I wish for the (imaginary, I think) halcyon days when we had heros we could worship because they had heroic values, not just because they did heroic deeds.

Banking meltdown in the US... saw this coming for the past couple years. Hopefully we'll let the market adjust so we can begin recovery, rather than postponing and exacerbating the problem. I have a great sense of unease about the next few years economically, but I'm not sure how to put myself in the best position to ride it out.

Presidential politics... same bat time, same bat channel as last election cycle, and all the ones I remember. Quick thoughts: Palin's in over her head, McCain is good at dissembling, Obama is gliding on the winds of change, Biden should've stayed in the Senate.

Rutgers football has gotten a rude awakening, Schiano better get his team to a competitive level before all his recruits de-commit.

Being a father continues to bring new joys constantly, I can't wait until my daughter can actually tell me she loves me, even though I can see it in her outstretched arms when I get home before her bedtime. On the plus side, she does signal 'touchdown' by raising her arms if I say it. Makes watching football even better :)

A good friend got married after living with his girfriend for over a decade. Congrats to them! Great people, maybe they'll be contributing more to the gene pool soon... don't know why else they would decide to get married after ten years together.

Other good friends had their first child... good luck to them, they'll need it. I thought I had a hard time adjusting to life with a baby, I think they're in for some real eye-opening.

Anyway, here's to hoping I remember to continue quarterly updates for some future retrospection.

Cheers.

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Memeprisal: This time it's reasonable

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 6 years ago This comes via ShadowWrought from stoolpigeon, JC, Smitty, and originally, ShadowWrought thinks, RM6f9.
Post a comment to this thread, and I will:

1. Tell you why I befriended you.
2. Associate you with something - fandom, a song, a color, a photo, etc..
3. Tell you something I like about you.
4. Tell you a memory I have of you.
5. Ask something I've always wanted to know about you.
7. In return, you must post this in your Journal/Blag/whatever.

Viva la chain blog.

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2 ^ 12 - 1 comments & a ramble

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 6 years ago So I happened to click on my comments tab today, and see that I have made 4095 comments. This means my next comment will be my 2^12th comment.

After a little consideration, I thought that it should be _really_ meaningful. A little more consideration, and I thought, "Wow, that's a lot of comments (nts: need to get out more) -- I wonder how my posting style has changed over the years."

Sorry for the navel-gazing (not that anyone reads my journals, anyway -- I'm averaging less than one entry every two years), but this got me thinking about personal numerical significance. Anytime I see a power of two greater than 2^10, I get a little warm fuzy feeling. I've got most of the powers of two memorized to some ungodly power, due to the influence of Telengard on the Commodore PET. I dimly remember that spell points were calculated by the formula for x = 1 to level: SP = SP + x. I remember also that exp need for the next level was 1000*2^(current level). I think the highest character I ever had was level 65, so I guess that's why I memorized 2^x all the way to the 65th power. I currently can spot powers of two to about 2^20.

I think it's interesting that this was what led me to a lifelong interest in mathematics, and in particular, formulas. Sure, maybe my affinity for math drew me to such silly pursuits while playing Telengard... but computer gaming had a big impact on my development. I still recall trying to build my own code for Telengard in Basic -- it's how I began to teach myself to code. It was the READ code that completely stumped me and taught me that sometimes you need to ask for help.

It's two and a half decades later, and I still remember my own personal summers of code. Adding functionality to Telengard, like magic weapons with 'charged' abilities and stat-gain abilities -- I think I got started just a bit early (and on the wrong machine) to have a blast tweaking Rogue. Who knows what might have come of it.

To continue the divergence from why I initially started this journal entry, I remember about 7-8 years ago my parents finally packed up and moved to their "retirement" house. I had a last look-over the items they were getting rid of, and in that pile in the basement was a box full of mildewed cassette tapes. Some were of music (the Hooters, Talking Heads, the Fixx, Dire Straights, Quiet Riot, to name a few groups) but the vast majority were of games and programs for the PET. I let them be discarded, but now I wish I could pull the data off and see what my earliest attempts at code were like -- especially the BASIC programs of over 2,000 lines before I learned about GOSUB :). I wonder if it'd be scarier than deciphering some of the perl code I've seen in recent years.

Anyway, it's been a nice short trip down memory lane this afternoon.

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Seeing as its been a couple years since the last entry

Red Flayer Red Flayer writes  |  more than 7 years ago Just wanted to clear the air.

It would be a shame if anyone reading my last (and until now, only) journal entry thought it was from a few days ago, rather than 2y+. I no longer learn much new from reading slashdot, since topics are recycled so much... other than reinforcement of the fact that I know a lot less than I once thought I did. And some current events, though it seems that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Anyway, that's enough disjointed Friday rambling for now.

GO RUTGERS!

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