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Be True To Your CS School: LinkedIn Ranks US Schools For Job-Seeking Programmers

Registered Coward v2 Re:Missing the point (124 comments)

While that may be true in some areas; not having a college degree greatly reduces your employment chances, especially in technical fields.

In the field of software development, which is the topic at hand, it only matters for your first job (unless you work for the government). Getting that first job is a bitch, however.

True, and TFA was about recent grads and jobs; to which your comment about a first job is relevant and demonstrates the importance of a degree.

yesterday
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Be True To Your CS School: LinkedIn Ranks US Schools For Job-Seeking Programmers

Registered Coward v2 Re:Missing the point (124 comments)

This is entirely false. I've never had any difficulty whatsoever obtaining employment related to software development or systems/infrastructure roles, and neither have most of my peers who hold similar credentials. Perhaps this trend has been partially related to our ability to demonstrate skills on demand, i.e. "get the job done, and done properly" rather than an appeal to a piece of paper that essentially says "trust this guy; he passed some exams that may or may not actually bear any relation whatsoever to the work your business needs done right now."

I am perpetually amazed by the volume of collective myth parroting that persists on this topic. To be perfectly clear: lack of a college degree may indeed greatly reduce your chances of employment in many fields, but it matters a hell of a lot less than you've been led to believe for software development and systems/infrastructure positions.

Once someone has a ton of experience a degree certainly doesn't limit you, especially if you do contract work where specific skill set is need for a limited amount of time, most HS graduates lack that experience and neve will get a foot in the door. Also, anecdote is not the singular of data.

yesterday
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Be True To Your CS School: LinkedIn Ranks US Schools For Job-Seeking Programmers

Registered Coward v2 Re:Missing the point (124 comments)

A huge number of software development jobs don't require a CS degree, including many highly paid positions. In fact, having a CS degree may reduce the odds of being hired for some positions. It seems the trend of misunderstanding the term "computer science" hasn't lost any momentum.

While that may be true in some areas; not having a college degree greatly reduces your employment chances, especially in technical fields.

2 days ago
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Be True To Your CS School: LinkedIn Ranks US Schools For Job-Seeking Programmers

Registered Coward v2 The method used in TFA (124 comments)

is basically "if a lot of people leave companies for Company A then A is a desirable place to work; what are the most prevalent schools that A's employees attended." So basically if your goal is to work at A you have a statistically better chance of landing a job if you work at one of the top schools in its list. That says nothing about the quality of the school nor that their grads do any better in terms of percent employees or starting salaries than other schools; nor does it seem to address the experience level of those hired. I also think the results are biased to companies that hire a lot of people each year so you might expect more people to go to them, thus increasing their desirability in Linkedin's model; yet a small company that hires very selectively and is a place many graduates want to work would not impact the school rankings.

As for the question of the impact of an alma mater on hiring, having a highly regarded school on a resume would at least get it a second look; as would having my alma mater on the resume. However, I'd hire the top person at a "lesser" school over someone at the bottom of a more prestigious one. The former shows they have a work ethic and keep their eyes on the prize while they are in college; the latter comes across as someone who just gets by.

As for the "person at the bottom may just be so smart they are bored to tears by their classes and thus basically ignored them while doing something really brilliant" argument; fine, but most work at many companies is routine and boring at some point but you still need it done well. If i really need someone very good at some specific then I can find them; what I don't need is someone who checks out overtime they get asked to d something they find uninteresting.

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Handling Patented IP In a Job Interview?

Registered Coward v2 Re:lawyer up (224 comments)

Bring in a lawyer. Welcome to the big time.

If you take any other advice here, you are an idiot. Not one person here can honestly tell you what to do unless they are part of your negotiation.

If you advance sufficiently far, you should be able to get some basic contacts for the company. I would ask the legal team there what advice they have. But if you take my advice without asking a qualified lawyer, you are an idiot.

Don't ask legal questions here, and don't follow any advice given. Especially this advice about not following advice.

This is the best advice in this thread, with one caveat. You need to have a disinterested third party, i.e your lawyer, walls you through what rights you have and the potential ramifications. You already said you are talking to your lawyer, which is a ritual step before you go further. Your lawyer can advise you on what you need too do to protect yourself. For example, can your previous contract employer claim to own your patents? I do not know the answer to that, but it is a critical question, IMHO, to know the answer to before you proceed. Your lawyer can and should review previous contracts to clarify that as well as advise you on how to proceed.

the caveat: Remember the lawyers for your prospective employer are bound to look after your prospective employer's best interest. They do not represent you, and thus anything they say may not be in your best interests. I would leave them out of the discussion unless they employer brings them in, and then would let your lawyer talk for you at that point.

Personally, I would approach prospective employee who brings patents to the table as a professional and evaluate them based on what I think they can do for me, and the patents would not be an issue unless I planed to use them. Quite frankly, if I was interested in them i would bring them up because i would not want them to become a problem after I hired you. I would be comfortable discussing how I would like to use them and work out a mutually beneficial agreement; which of course would involve my consulting with my attorneys to understand the legal steps I need to take to protect my interests and to avoid a future lawsuit. Then again, that is my personal opinion so take it for what it is worth;which is exactly what you paid for it, zero.

5 days ago
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Google Rejects 58% of "Right To Be Forgotten" Requests

Registered Coward v2 Re:Reasonable (144 comments)

The Europeans should not be attacking Google for indexing what is available on the Internet, they should be talking to the people that put that information on the Internet in the first place.

The problem is that would create a large backlash from a lot of people who, for a variety of reasons, would find such requests unreasonable. Google, and other search engines, are unable to mobilize such responses and thus a more palatable target. That it is a US company is just a bonus.

about a week ago
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FBI Says It Will Hire No One Who Lies About Illegal Downloading

Registered Coward v2 Re:yes, they people who follow the law/ rules (576 comments)

. The rule that what I create with my own hands os mine to give away, trade, or sell exists for a very good reason. And what's that reason? Not everyone agrees about imaginary property Ray. The concept is rather new. You're free to disagree, but the world is changing and as information is so easy to copy fewer and fewer people are seeing things your way.

It's about time too. Far too many people think because they take two minutes to add some code to a program they have some sort of right to control its distribution. Gold code, for example, costs nothing and thus has zero value yet some folks seem to think it is ok to force you to share any changes you make if decide to distribute the results. Since it is imaginary property and they lose nothing by your distributing it it's about time the GPL takes it's rightfully place in the dust bin of history.

about two weeks ago
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US Remains Top Country For Global Workers

Registered Coward v2 Re:Opportunity (123 comments)

You are drinking the kool-aid. Just look at the wealth gap between rich and poor - clearly the dream is just that - a dream.

The wealth gap is mostly irrelevant in the discussion of opportunity. There are plenty of wealthy people that started with nothing. And even more that are comfortable that came from similar circumstances. The question was why do immigrants see the US as desirable place to move to and the answer is, in part, because they see an opportunity to better their lives vs other places. It's not perfect but still is preferential to many others. Don't let your drinking the 'I'm not rich so life is unfair and I'm a poor victim' Kool-Aid blind you to reality.

about two weeks ago
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The Malware of the Future May Come Bearing Real Gifts

Registered Coward v2 Re:Malware (103 comments)

It's already here. They're called smartphone apps.

Actually, that is probably the holy grail for malware. If you can sneak an app past Apple's testing by delaying its activities you would open up a whole lot of phones to infections. Given the readiness of people to d/l and trust smartphone apps you could probably get away with it for quite some times I doubt many people look for suspicious behavior once your inside the walled garden; just look at what today's apps can (somewhat) openly collect. The challenge is to build one that avoids detection and bypasses Apple's built in protections and become popular enough to get a lot of downloads.

about two weeks ago
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US Remains Top Country For Global Workers

Registered Coward v2 Opportunity (123 comments)

Despite the viewpoint of many on /., America is still viewed as a place where you can achieve success no matter where you are from. Sure, if you have family connections you have a leg up but you are not limited if you didn't go to the right school or have connections. the "american Dream" is still viewed as a possibility; even for young Americans who see greater opportunities here than abroad. If you make money you are granted access to power a lot quicker in America than in many other countries; and it is easier to start from nothing and make it here than in many places; so I am not surprised by the results.

about two weeks ago
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US Says It Can Hack Foreign Servers Without Warrants

Registered Coward v2 Re:So what they are saying... (335 comments)

Actually I don;t care whether any of us agree with the statement. It's a moot point since Reid v. Covert, where the Court concluded that U.S. citizens have the same rights against the U.S. government when it acts against them abroad.

Except Reid v. Covert as you point out, relates to US citizens. The property searched was not that of a US citizen and thus Reid v. Covert wouldn't apply, even though they found evidence to be used against a US citizen. The evidence was in the possession of a non-US citizen, i.e. the owners of the server, and thus enjoy no protection; at least that would be the argument the US seems to be making.

about two weeks ago
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US Says It Can Hack Foreign Servers Without Warrants

Registered Coward v2 Re:Sovereignty Issues ? (335 comments)

Usually a foreign property search requires the permission of that country to pre-approve the search. I very much doubt the US requested permission. Violating another country's sovereignty should never be taken lightly.

Which is a separate issue form the one that is being argued. The country could have given permission to US law enforcement to access the server; however that would not answer the question "Does Fourth Amendment protections apply in the case of a non-US search and seizure?" The answer to the later could be yes and thus the search illegal even with host country permission.

about two weeks ago
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US Says It Can Hack Foreign Servers Without Warrants

Registered Coward v2 Re:So what they are saying... (335 comments)

So what they are saying is that anyone outside the US can freely hack US servers without a warrant too. Surely they don't expect special treatment?

Not really. What they are saying is US Constitutional protections do not apply abroad. Wether or not you agree with that statement is a different issue than saying it's OK to hack into a US computer. The agents hacking into the computer could be guilty of violating the laws of the country that hosts the server an subject to prosecution if that country decides to go after them.

about two weeks ago
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Dubai Police To Use Google Glass For Facial Recognition

Registered Coward v2 Re:Enforce (122 comments)

You see, it might be Dubai, but the software will be perfected there, and it will migrate elsewhere. Slowly, it becomes acceptable in a conventional sense. Then it becomes "the norm".

A thousand cuts..... then a million.

I agree, my point was Dubai doesn't necessarily have the same due process concerns of the OP.

about two weeks ago
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Dubai Police To Use Google Glass For Facial Recognition

Registered Coward v2 Re:Enforce (122 comments)

You forgot to mention the necessary sense of walking around: liberty. Even if you're a "positive", what of due process? Will you land in a jail, await a long process? How and who guarantees that you'll be then excluded if you're falsely positive? It's a slippery slope. Google has opened a Pandora's box of paranoia.

Will people stop traveling in fear of false-positives? Where are governments permitted to gnaw on their citizenry, privacy death by a thousand cuts?

It's Dubai. They don't have those worries.

about two weeks ago
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Code.org: Blame Tech Diversity On Education Pipeline, Not Hiring Discrimination

Registered Coward v2 Salary differentials (227 comments)

If companies want a diverse workforce then the people who are not well represented would command a higher salary, for the same skills, since companies in essence would be bidding for a scarce resource. While the pay gap is large, small or non-exsistant, depending on the study you use; the existence of a gap or parity indicates companies do not value diverse workforces enough to pay for them. However they want to appear to do so and thus need to find a reason why it's not their fault; the educational pipeline is convenient and kills two birds with one stone; "we can't hire more women because schools aren't producing enough with STEM skills and by the way that's why we need more H1-B's." As Hal Holbrook said, "follow the money..."

about two weeks ago
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Could Maroney Be Prosecuted For Her Own Hacked Pictures?

Registered Coward v2 Interestingly enough (274 comments)

you can in many jurisdiction legally marry as a minor; just don't take any pictures afterward.

about three weeks ago
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2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Registered Coward v2 Re:Castle Doctrine (269 comments)

is public-facing CCTV legal in those states? What's the difference if it's mounted in a vehicle like a bus or (gasp!) a private conveyance?

You are not recording the conversation with video. Personally, this is an area where technology has outpaced the law.

about three weeks ago
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2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Registered Coward v2 Re:Castle Doctrine (269 comments)

My car is a mobile extension of my home. By accepting my invitation to enter, you are accepting the moral and legal obligations that accompany, viz: you consent to being monitored, you consent to being recorded, and you promise to behave yourself lest the recordings be used against you in a civil or criminal claim.

Unfortunately that is not what the law says in some states. What would deb interesting is how a one party consent state would consider who the other party is? the car? The owner even if they are not a party to the call?

about three weeks ago
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Why India's Mars Probe Was So Cheap

Registered Coward v2 Re:They outsourced their engineering to India (200 comments)

Honestly, is there no lever the Indian government won't sink to to save money?

Yea, but what until something goes wrong and Bob on tech support line tells them they need to reinstall Windows. Or MS tech support calls them and tells them "I have been monitoring your computer and you have a reall bad virus that will steal your information. "

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Get off my lawn

Registered Coward v2 Registered Coward v2 writes  |  about a year ago

Registered Coward v2 (447531) writes "Identifying a nerd was easier years ago — calculator on the belt and a box of Hollerith cards. Part computer program, part note card, and part bookmark, they were a readily available source of nerd badges at any campus. As with many tech icons, they have drifted into oblivion.

So what do you do if:

you got a new computer, or maybe a software upgrade, only to find — error message! — that some of your old files are incompatible.

and the files you have are valuable historical data needed for current research? How about finding a USB compatible Hollerith card reader?"

Link to Original Source
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Supreme Court to hear First Sale Doctrine case

Registered Coward v2 Registered Coward v2 writes  |  about 2 years ago

Registered Coward v2 (447531) writes "SCOTUS is set to hear a case to determine how copyright law and the doctrine of first sale applies to copyrighted works bought overseas, imported to the US and then sold. The case involves a foreign student who imported textbooks from Asia and the resold them in the US to help fund his education. He was sued by the publisher, lost and was ordered to pay $600k in damages. Now SCOTUS gets to weigh in on the issue."
Link to Original Source
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iPads as overhead projectors

Registered Coward v2 Registered Coward v2 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Registered Coward v2 (447531) writes "A University of Michigan professor has combined iPads with a set of software tools to create an effective replacement for projected Powerpoint, clickers, and the like to allow students to interact and annotate the lecture notes on iPads, iPhones, and computers. As he puts it, he has used these tools to create " show your slides + ask questions of students (multiple-choice, true-false, rearrange lists, image-based and free response — take THAT clickers!) and display the results in real-time + collect and answer student questions + have access to analytical data on student participation + DRAW ON THE SLIDES LIKE WITH AN OVERHEAD!"

Even better — a roller equipped overhead."

Link to Original Source
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Apple Time Capsules Dying

Registered Coward v2 Registered Coward v2 writes  |  about 5 years ago

Registered Coward v2 (447531) writes "Reports are surfacing of dying power supplies in Apple's Time Capsule drives, leaving users with vey nicely designed 9and expensive) paper weights. The problem appears to be failure of the internal power supply, making it impossible to power up the device. One website logged 260 reports of dead Apple Time capsules since going live last weekend. Apple has not yet responded to reports of this problem."
Link to Original Source
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It's football, not a funeral

Registered Coward v2 Registered Coward v2 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Registered Coward v2 (447531) writes "From a Notre Dame University press release: In an effort to encourage appropriate behavior, fans will be able to utilize a new text messaging system to report any instances of unruly or disruptive behavior in conjunction with home games, including inside Notre Dame Stadium. The system will be in place beginning at 8 a.m. on Saturdays. Fans can simply text 41513 and type into the message the word "Irish" followed by a space, followed by a brief description of the issue and its location. Ushers, public safety personnel and/or University officials will respond as needed.

Interesting use of technology; but even with ND's performance on the field it's still a football game. I guess they expect people to sit quietly and occasionally utter a "nice play" and clap politely. At least you now have a way to complain about cold hotdogs and dirty toilets."
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Registered Coward v2 Registered Coward v2 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Registered Coward v2 (447531) writes "Best Buy has been caught using an intranet to limit price matching of their own web site. http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-watchdog0302, 0,5198012.column?coll=hc-utility-local Apparently, according to a company spokesman, their employees find it difficult to distinguish between accessing an internal site and their own external ones. Of course, they have no problem distinguishing between a higher and lower price nor charging the higher one."

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