Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

The $1,200 DIY Gunsmithing Machine

Rich0 Re:BZZT. (228 comments)

It's a good idea to serialize it before you sell it though, and record the transaction.

Yup. When the police find an AR-15 with the number "1" cheaply engraved on it, they'll be hot on the trail of the person who bought it!

2 hours ago
top

To Fight $5.2B In Identity Theft, IRS May Need To Change the Way You File Taxes

Rich0 Re:Corporate taxes (406 comments)

The difference is that I have precedence on my side where as you have nothing but speculation on yours.

Sure, just like the folks who said that real estate prices would never go down had all kind of precedence on their side. History is useful, but we're talking about technological change here. What precedence can you possibly cite that has any bearing on the creation of artificial intelligence?

As to your fear of the future... that merely makes me sad for you. The future holds promise. But only if it is allowed to become.

I don't fear the future. Nobody has to allow the future to become - it is inevitable that it will become. It holds the possibility of both promise and peril. I think in large part it will just come down to who makes the big breakthroughs. What would the world look like if Germany or Japan had developed the atomic bomb in quantity in WWII (the latter part of that being very unlikely so this is pretty hypothetical I'll admit)? Hard to say for sure, but certainly it would look a lot different than it does today.

You have no interest in examining this question and because of that you will never even attempt to understand what is going on.

You seem to think that the only reason I am not coming to the same conclusion as you is that I haven't given the matter any thought. The one does not follow from the other.

I think the average person in the US isn't employed is because the average American isn't employable for wages that allow survival in the US. Wages in the 3rd world are so incredibly low compared to what people in the 1st world can afford to pay for products right now that there is a delay while wealth is transferred from the 1st to 3rd world before the same thing happens there. Most of the jobs that have been outsourced are jobs that could be done by machines, but labor is just so insanely cheap overseas that even machines can't compete. Sooner or later things will level out and machines will continue to get cheaper, and even $5/day will seem like too much to pay somebody for menial labor.

If you want to understand why the jobs are going away, just think about the average kid in any school class you've ever taken. They're just not up to it.

3 hours ago
top

2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Rich0 Re:Illegal or inadmissable? (269 comments)

Sure, but for whatever reason PA is always brought up as an example of a two-party state, and I'm not sure how any of this extends to recording what happens in your car.

3 hours ago
top

2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Rich0 Re:Illegal or inadmissable? (269 comments)

A problem in the US is that your rights are whatever you're willing to pay to try to defend. The fact is that you can be taken to court for just about anything, by just about anybody. If the letter of the law is on your side, it will certainly help, and if it is against you, it will certainly hurt. However, the legal system is fuzzy enough that you can't really predict with certainty the outcome of any case.

What you can do is look at how past court cases have gone, but recording conversations is something that is rarely prosecuted.

3 hours ago
top

The Secret Goldman Sachs Tapes

Rich0 Re:is anyone really surprised here (198 comments)

I am not sure what you mean by "a properly-regulated insurance industry regulates itself." I am sensing a paradox between "properly-regulated ", which implies external, and "regulates itself", which implies internal. So I am not sure what you are trying to say.

I was just referring to a minimalistic approach to regulation that gives the insurance market-based incentives that are aligned to the consumer. In the case of insurnace, you just have to make sure that they REALLY have skin in the game.

If I can sell you FlyByNightCo insurance with no reserves, then I can start FlyByNightCo with an investment of $200 to some lawyer to do the paperwork, start collecting $20 premiums for $200k policies, and pay myself dividends and disappear when the claims arrive.

On the other hand, if FlyByNightCo needs reserves based on historical payout rates in order to sell policies, then in order to sell $200k policies I might need $1k in reserves. I can't put up $1k in reserves if I'm only making $20 on the premium, because if I try to pull a disappearing act the government will just take my company's reserves and I'M the one who gets screwed.

So, the government doesn't have to regulate the price of an insurance policy. They just have to make sure that insurance company investors actually lose money on bad policies, and there won't be any bad policies.

The reason the CDS market was so huge was that anybody could sell them, and nobody really intended to actually pay on them if anything really went wrong, and the lack of reserves meant that nobody could make them pay either.

3 hours ago
top

Which Cars Get the Most Traffic Tickets?

Rich0 Re:well thank god im at the bottom of the list. (198 comments)

There was a car customization shop around me that had a souped up minivan that they would drag race people with sports cars (and smoke them). Then hand out business cards.

You know, you could actually put quite a bit of power in a minivan with all that space... Heck, you could easily fit a gas turbine in there.

3 hours ago
top

Hong Kong Protesters Use Mesh Networks To Organize

Rich0 Re:About fucking time. (79 comments)

Really the biggest problem with using a mesh network for disaster is that anywhere you have enough people to support a mesh network, you could probably just as easily use a bullhorn to communicate.

A bullhorn is useful for general announcements, but not specific ones like "We need Fred to come in early for a shift at the hospital due to an emergency."

Sure, you can put that out over the bullhorn at 3AM, but if you have a constant trickle of those then nobody anywhere gets sleep, and then Fred ends up killing somebody due to a fatigue-induced surgical error.

The advantage of a mesh network is that you can get the message to Fred whose phone rings, without having to bug every other human being in the city. The downside is that nobody wants a non-centrally-controlled mesh network for the same reasons that Beijing doesn't want it.

4 hours ago
top

Ebola Has Made It To the United States

Rich0 Re:Don't freak out. (424 comments)

Heck, I'm a believer in modern medicine, but any of the stuff on the first list would have to be horrible before I'd go to a hospital. Unless the hospital screens everybody with a cough for Ebola they won't bat an eye at that list of symptoms.

Even the second list doesn't really get weird until halfway down. Nausea is hardly uncommon. Bloody diarrhea probably would get noticed, if there was quite a bit of blood (a few drops and people won't think twice of it).

If the symptoms were really intense they'd probably get attention. If I feel tired, nauseous, etc I'll lie in bed. If it causes excruciating pain to roll over in bed, I'll call 911.

5 hours ago
top

Ebola Has Made It To the United States

Rich0 Re:Completely Contained? (424 comments)

How does a hospital release someone who just traveled from Liberia and has symptoms consistent with Ebola? They allowed this person to expose people for twice as long compared to if they had handled the situation as common sense would dictate. [Isolate and test]

What is their insurance company policy on admissions? It isn't like the doctor decides who gets checked in. Also, we don't lock people in hospitals either, so the patient gets a say.

People will treat Ebola like it is the common cold until 10% of the country is bleeding out of their eyeballs, and then we'll start to debate whether more drastic measures are required.

6 hours ago
top

Microsoft Announces Windows 10

Rich0 Re:Dear MS (605 comments)

The problem with this is that unless the new OS uses win32 on all those platforms, they don't have that huge application base they're trying to leverage.

Win8 was the attempt to get everybody to move to Metro, and it failed. Of course, they were stupid to introduce the app store on the desktop since that probably REALLY deterred people from porting over. They should have gotten everybody to port first, and then changed the rules once everybody was on the new cross-platform API.

In any case, I think they'd be doomed anyway. If you're building a Facebook reader it isn't that big of a deal to make a one-size-fits-all UI. If it only has 6 menu options users on the 20" screen won't care so much about the 1" tile buttons. The problem is that nobody has come up with a way to make full productivity applications work on things like phones. You can strip out all the features, and people will tolerate them as viewers or apps for making tweaks, but what serious business says, "you know, we don't need professional tools - we're going to compose the next Hollywood movie using an app designed to add filters to something shot with a phone cam."

Heck, Adobe just announced that they're making Photoshop available over a web browser. I'm still not sure how well that will work (does html5 support graphics tablets?). Even that potential source of failure exposes the real problem here - people doing serious work are hard to box into super-simplified applications. People want their 15 floating windows, and their magic USB tablet that senses pen pressure, angle (2DOF), button pressure, distance, etc.

6 hours ago
top

The Secret Goldman Sachs Tapes

Rich0 Re:is anyone really surprised here (198 comments)

No, the issue was that they priced the insurance too cheaply. It was a quick way to juice the returns. A example would be insurance companies offering cheap earthquake insurance. All of the premiums they take in is free money until the big one hits. Then they all collapse. Which speaks to a different type of regulation.

Sure, but that is the reason that insurance is regulated. In fact, a properly-regulated insurance industry regulates itself.

Even absent a law saying I can't buy insurance on a car that you own, nobody would sell it to me. They would be required to cover that policy with assets which means that they would have to make good on the policy, and they would realize that I have no incentive to preserve something I don't even own. Responsible insurance companies structure their policies so that the person who is insured has incentive to preserve the assets that are insured. The people who invest the money in the insurance companies stand to lose if the company is irresponsible, so they ensure it isn't.

However, these CDS instruments were created by people who had no intent to ever cover any substantial losses. Their incentive was to collect their bonus today, and let somebody else hold the bag tomorrow. Since they didn't have to have assets to cover the policies, nobody had incentive to play it safe. If I could legally sell flood insurance for $10/yr without any assets, I'd probably be selling it to half the country if I didn't have a conscience.

yesterday
top

Breakthrough In LED Construction Increases Efficiency By 57 Percent

Rich0 Re:The industry will screw you anyway... (182 comments)

My understand is that the drivers are the main factor for just about any LED light. I'm sure there is quality variation in the LEDs themselves, but most of the stuff that costs money, wears out, and impacts quality is in the drivers.

2 days ago
top

Breakthrough In LED Construction Increases Efficiency By 57 Percent

Rich0 Re:You know what this means (182 comments)

The red light thing isn't neurological/perceptual at all. The pigments used by rod cells do not respond strongly to red light the way they do to other colors. It is the decomposition of those pigments that destroys your night vision.

Your brain may very well self-adjust to color temperature as well, but that isn't the reason that blue light is so destructive.

3 days ago
top

Why You Can't Manufacture Like Apple

Rich0 Re:Apple sells jewelry, plain and simple (408 comments)

IN short: you're boned and trusting third parties irrespective of how open your OS is - unless all of your hardware is open, all of the firmware for your hardware is open, and you have personally audited all of it.

Heck, I'm trusting my next door neighbor to not shoot me when I step out the door.

The fact that I didn't build every component of my computer from raw silicon doesn't mean that there isn't value in having some knowledge of how some parts of it work.

Besides, I'm not talking about keeping my data out of the hands of the NSA. I wasn't actually concerned with security at all in my post. I'm just saying that open source software gives you options that you don't otherwise have, because having the source gives you the ability to fix the 99.999999% of problems that weren't caused by the NSA sticking a rootkit into your CPU.

4 days ago
top

2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Rich0 Re:Illegal or inadmissable? (269 comments)

I believe the consent can be implicit, hence announcements like those. Of course, if you made the same announcement when calling a business they'd just hang up on you, and you'd end up having to resort to registered mail or such (which they could also refuse to accept, but that would give you quite a bit of legal advantage).

4 days ago
top

To Fight $5.2B In Identity Theft, IRS May Need To Change the Way You File Taxes

Rich0 Re:Corporate taxes (406 comments)

I literally can't have this discussion with you if you're going to refuse to even look into any of your own premises.

This cuts both ways. Your entire argument is based on the assumption that there will always be enough jobs to go around. I just don't see that as the case.

Take somebody who is a quadriplegic and is mentally retarded. What kind of job can they ever get (aside from some kind of subsidized make-work program)? Now, explain what difference there is between that person and you or I other than a matter of degree. If the person could twitch one finger, would he be better off? If he could say his name, would he be better off? There is a continuum between somebody who is able to get a job and the cripple in my example, and somewhere along the way people just can't get jobs. Automation just has the effect of moving the threshold, and as we progress that threshold will get to a point where the majority of the population falls below it.

As far as cost of living goes - this just reflects the distribution of wealth. Sure, I guess somebody with a minimum wage job might be able to rent an unimproved lot in the middle of a desert somewhere, but there aren't any minimum wage jobs within walking distance of such a lot, so that isn't a scenario that actually exists.

Walk into an average slum sometime and tell me that you'd hire somebody who lives there without some kind of subsidy. They just don't have any skills worth hiring them for, and cracking the whip isn't going to magically make them get those skills. Most likely they'd riot first, and starve second. Of course, conservatives would never let that happen - they'd just put them in jail where they get all that free food they aren't willing to hand out to folks who aren't in prison, and they can pay to guard them as an added bonus.

4 days ago
top

2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Rich0 Re:Illegal or inadmissable? (269 comments)

Yup. Companies will often hang up if you disclose that a phone call is being recorded, and I've even had one which refused to speak to me if I was on speakerphone (I was helping out somebody who had a speech difficulty, and they insisted that I give the phone to them to authorize me to speak to them and then take the phone and speak without the other person being able to hear). I think this is all part of a strategy to ensure that if the company does something wrong it is just one person's word against another's (having another witness would complicate things).

4 days ago
top

To Fight $5.2B In Identity Theft, IRS May Need To Change the Way You File Taxes

Rich0 Re:Corporate taxes (406 comments)

1. Labor isn't obsolete and shall never be obsolete until robots are in all ways superior to the average person. That is unlikely to happen at any point in the near future. What is more, if that does happen... we all get personal robot slaves and we'll probably devolve into an incredibly decadent society...

So, all labor won't be obsolete until robots are in all ways superior to the average person.

However, before then various types of labor DEFINITELY will become obsolete as machines become superior to people in individual domains. It used to be that you could make a decent living as a ditch digger. Today that is impossible.

When robots can replace all labor, then anybody who can afford a robot will be able to live like a king. In the present economic system that will be unlikely for most for the same reason that most people can't afford to live in Chicago...

2. Much of the cost of living problems are the result of rising COSTS not the falling value of the labor itself. Compare the cost of living in Chicago for example with the cost of living in Anchorage Alaska...

This is actually the exact same problem. It doesn't matter whether costs go up or the value of labor goes down - the one relative to the other is all that matters. Property is capital. Robots are capital. In a sense even money is capital. Our current economy has been concentrating capital of all kinds in the hands of relatively few people, since having capital makes it easier to acquire more.

A poor person can't afford a house in Chicago for the same reason that they can't afford to buy a robot and get somebody to pay them to have their robot work an assembly line for them.

5 days ago
top

2015 Corvette Valet Mode Recorder Illegal In Some States

Rich0 Re:Illegal or inadmissable? (269 comments)

The Supremes disagree with your full stop.They have made it quite clear you can record police without their consent. So there goes your theory on some states having full stop laws on recording.

Good point. In that case it may or may not be illegal to record audio in some states, and if you get arrested for it you just have to pay to get your case reviewed by the supreme court. Hopefully you have deep pockets.

The laws on the books say that it is illegal. There is only one way to find out how a court would rule, and that is to get prosecuted for violating the letter of the law.

5 days ago

Submissions

top

Cheap second calculators for tests

Rich0 Rich0 writes  |  about 10 months ago

Rich0 (548339) writes "I own an HP 48 calculator that I'm quite content with, but soon I'll need to take a certification exam where this calculator will not be welcome. I'm sure this is a common problem for those who own higher-end calculators. Sure, I could just buy a random $15 calculator with a few trig functions, but I was wondering who makes the best moderately-priced calculators for somebody who already has and appreciates a programmable calculator and just needs something simple. Bonus points if the calculator can handle polar vector arithmetic and unit conversions, but it has to be simple enough that virtually any exam would accept its use."
top

Students Punished for Facebook Group Affiliation

Rich0 Rich0 writes  |  about 4 years ago

Rich0 (548339) writes "More than 100 students from Souderton Area High School (just a few miles from Lower Merion School District) signed up as fans of a Facebook group celebrating National Kick a Freshman day. The school reacted by taking minor disciplinary action against anybody who signed up, and sent out a mailing to all parents in the school. Online news is sparse and no information is available yet on the school's website."
Link to Original Source
top

Eminent Domain Ends in Irony

Rich0 Rich0 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Rich0 (548339) writes "Not long ago it was reported that the Supreme Court sided with a local town in their battle to evict residents to make room for a new corporate resident. In a twist of irony, Pfizer has decided to shutter the facility, leaving a to-be-abandoned facility in the place of the evicted homeowners."
Link to Original Source
top

Rich0 Rich0 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Rich0 (548339) writes "I have a growing pile of CDs/DVDs holding hundreds of GB of files. I would like a linux-compatible software solution to cataloging and searching these disks. Lots of solutions exist for music/video, but not so many for files.

Some features I'd like would be the ability to easily scan the disks (pop in disc, software reads disc, software prompts for a name (with something sensible defaulted), software ejects disc, softare tells me what if any label to write/apply to the disc, and software is ready for the next disc).

I've seen one or two packages out there but they usually require lots of manual disk labelling, or their search capabilities are limited. Windows-only software won't be of much use to me.

What are others using to manage their media collections?"

Journals

Rich0 has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?