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Study: People That Think Social Media Helps Their Work Are Probably Wrong

RichDiesal Re:Really... Facebooking doesn't help productivity (40 comments)

It's any social media use at all while at work. One of the dimensions of "good" behaviors was participating in an online work community. Presumably, most people would not think that using Facebook would help their job performance, so they would not report that as "good".

Some "good" example survey items linked in the article:
I request help from people on social media when I am having trouble solving a problem at work.
I communicate with existing customers or clients via social media.
When someone posts something negative about our organization or its employees on social media, I try to do something about it.

about 7 months ago
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Study: People That Think Social Media Helps Their Work Are Probably Wrong

RichDiesal Re:Hmm.. (40 comments)

The people participating in the study thought these behaviors would help their job performance.... communicating with customers, reaching out to new customers, participating in an online work community, communicating with coworkers, gathering information from colleagues, asking friends/coworkers/family for help solving a work problem, and using social media as a technical solution (e.g. transferring a file from one computer to another). On the surface, it looks like these things would help in many jobs. But from the data, they were unassociated with better work performance.

about 7 months ago
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Study: Video Gamer Aggression Result of Game Experience, Not Violent Content

RichDiesal Re:Nintendo Hard (180 comments)

Well, the study is just about "leading to aggression" and not "leading to homicide." The NES often made me, at least, want to throw my controller through the wall. That experience is probably a lot less common these days (in this age of easier, accessible gaming).

about 7 months ago
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Why Microsoft Killed the Windows Start Button

RichDiesal Re:stopped using it? (857 comments)

Who the hell is their focus group? I've not met a single person who doesn't use the start button.

I believe they collect anonymous click data. But guess who disables/declines collection of anonymous click data? People who actually know how to use their computers.

more than 2 years ago
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Simulators Take the Humans Out of Hiring

RichDiesal Re:If your job can be simulated (143 comments)

At some point, sure. Programmers will all be out of work once computers can effectively program themselves. But right now, it's not so straightforward. The OP describes call centers, and that's a really good example - while a simulator can present call center tasks to a job candidate (with simulated customer voices, for example), a simulator responding to customer service calls would not be nearly so successful.

A video game simulation is a controlled environment (HR can create a set of scenarios to be tested in the simulation) but real life is more random. It's up to HR to create a reasonable sample of work scenarios for the simulation, and the quality of those scenarios is directly proportional to the quality of the information you get out of the simulation. And it's also important to realize that they not claiming that simulations are the only hiring tool you'll ever need. They're just better than interviews alone (and way better than unstructured interviews, which are almost worthless).

I will say that I don't know a single organization that uses a simulation and NOTHING else. It would be very difficult to assess characteristics like interpersonal skills and job experience. A simulation is usually just one step of a larger hurdle-based system (usually a late step, since they tend to be expensive per-applicant).

more than 2 years ago
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Urine Test For Autism

RichDiesal Re:Labeling (228 comments)

Life expectancy has been going up at a pretty consistent rate in the United States since 1968.

For either medicine or sanitation to have made a substantial effect on life expectancy, we'd expect the timeline of advances in each to mirror advances in life expectancy (e.g. major medical breakthrough in 1973 matching a substantial increase in life expectancy in 1980). That clearly doesn't happen. Sanitation and medicine are both only a small piece of a much larger puzzle.

more than 4 years ago
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Urine Test For Autism

RichDiesal Re:Labeling (228 comments)

You clearly don't have or know anyone with an actual mental disorder. There is certainly harm done by false diagnosis/labeling, and some people certainly milk their diagnoses, but the majority of people with mental disorders find it somewhat of a relief when they discover that they have a condition that 1) is not their fault and 2) has treatment options.

Think of it this way - if you grew up, and throughout your elementary and even high school experience, you had skills and abilities that other people thought were bizarre, people always looked at you weird and you didn't know why, you had uncontrollable tics that other people just didn't, you were frustrated daily because you had a very difficult time controlling your own behaviors, and you constantly got in trouble because these behaviors were judged to be "bad."

Finding out "other people have this problem too, and here's what you can try to alleviate the symptoms" is important to help these people become "normal, productive members of society." Your assertion that diagnosis will "lead the majority of them to make excuses" is completely unfounded.

more than 4 years ago
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Attack of the PowerPoint-Wielding Professors

RichDiesal Re:Most professors guilty? (467 comments)

Also keep in mind that many students want to be someplace else too. It all really depends on your priorities as a student, which is never really made clear to applying undergraduates. If you are self-motivated and want to have the opportunity to get involved in a real laboratory and get experience as a research assistant, then go to an R1 university. You won't have as motivated instructors, but you'll have access to better facilities than you will elsewhere. But if you can't motivate yourself to learn from a book, and you need an instructor to tailor the material so that it's easier for you to learn it, you're probably better off at a small liberal arts college.

about 5 years ago
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The "Copyright Black Hole" Swallowing Our Culture

RichDiesal Why the Subject Matter Isn't Always Why They Read (278 comments)

Others have noted that the database could negatively affect some researchers for whom a book's subject matter isn't always why they read it."

This is a little vague. The purpose of one of TFAs is to show how inaccurate the metadata on books in their database can be, and how Google is unwilling to do anything about it. Thus, when researchers use Google book search to look up information about books, rather than read the book (as the summary implies), they can be mislead.

Two examples from TFA: a search for "Internet" in books published before 1950 produces 527 results, and a book entitled "Culture and Society 1780-1950" was supposedly published in 1899.

more than 5 years ago
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Placebos Are Getting More Effective

RichDiesal Re:WTF (349 comments)

They also defined effect size (a measure of the magnitude of a difference) as a measure of statistical significance (a decision based on the probability that an observed effect size would have occurred due to chance). But I suppose math/statistic confusion is even more common than experimental design confusion.

more than 5 years ago
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Social Networking Sites Getting Risky For Recruiting

RichDiesal Re:"A bank in Texas" (227 comments)

This is where RTFA comes in handy. The first paragraph of TFA:

You won't find Amegy Bank of Texas CEO Paul B. Murphy Jr. uploading new profile pictures onto Facebook or linking Twitter feeds to a MySpace page. Murphy, who heads the 87-branch, Houston-based bank, isn't personally involved in the brave new world of social networking Web sites, but he certainly knows what they are. And thanks to his lawyer, his bank is successfully navigating the legal land mines they can contain.

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal Re:From an Industrial Psychologist... (581 comments)

But then what does this include? Isn't knowledge a psychological state? Affectivity? Willingness to communicate?
"You can't discriminate against me just because I don't know things."
"You can't discriminate against me just because I hate everyone around me."
"You can't discriminate against me just because I refuse to talk to my coworkers."
 
It's a slippery slope, which is why it hasn't been added already...

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal Re:From an Industrial Psychologist (581 comments)

True - the correlation between intelligence tests and job performance are usually around .5-.6 and the correlation between conscientiousness (a personality trait) and JP is usually around .2-.3 - but it's better than nothing. But that's why I don't suggest small businesses use them. They only help organizational outcomes (profit) when used in the aggregate, over hundreds of applicants.

For reference, the correlation between unstructured interviews conducting by HR managers and JP is around 0...

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal Re:From an Industrial Psychologist... (581 comments)

Bah... nevermind. My math is terrible. :)

But you are still relying on the hiring manager having some degree of skill at identifying these people. And why is a test any more humiliating than an interview?

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal Re:From an Industrial Psychologist... (581 comments)

100 people + $10 per online test = $1000 expense

100 people x 15 minutes organizational time spent per interview x $20/h hiring manager = $30000 expense

Which would you go with?

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal Re:From an Industrial Psychologist... (581 comments)

The one extraordinary employee you throw away could easily outweigh the benefits of increasing job performance on average.

Drug tests are actually related to job performance as well. If you correlate drug test pass/fail rates with supervisor ratings of job performance within companies that use drug tests but don't hire on them, there actually is a correlation - people who pass drug tests perform better. It's also easily legally defensible, which makes it a no-brainer for most hiring organizations.

Personality actually is correlated with job performance as well, and is job-related. The most empircally-supported personality trait is conscientiousness, which is a person's general tendency toward organization, orderliness, and meeting deadlines. Guess where that kind of tendency is useful. If you already like being organized, and your company wants you to be organized, you're probably going to be better at it than someone who doesn't like it.

Also, if you are conducting a major hiring effort to add 100 employees, your assertion probably is not true. 100 slightly above average employees will still better produce better overall organizational outcomes than 99 randomly hired employees and 1 exceptional one.

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal Re:From an Industrial Psychologist (581 comments)

There are modern studies that show the same thing - intelligence test score means still differ by race, and intelligence tests are the best predictor of job performance that we know of, substantially better than knowledge tests or interviews. It creates a bit of a legal problem, considering Title VII. The best predictor of job performance that we know of usually shows mean racial differences.

Personality test score means don't differ by race however (NEO included), which is part of what makes them so attractive to HR.

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal Re:From an Industrial Psychologist... (581 comments)

Well, many people suggest taking anyone that appears to be cheating and either 1) not hire them, or 2) put them through a more rigorous interview process. If you can hire the non-cheaters for $10 per applicant, and then do a more rigorous interview (at whatever hourly rate the hiring manager earns) for those that might be cheating, the company is ultimately saving money on their hiring system, which is the purpose of using these tests in the first place.

And on that note, I would never suggest using personality tests in small businesses - the correlation between personality test scores and job performance is just too low for it to be justifiable unless you are introducing it into an environment in which hundreds of potential employees will be taking it (in which case, it should still be part of a multi-stage system).

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal From an Industrial Psychologist... (581 comments)

That sounds like a company correctly testing a personality measure that they are considering adapting in the future, even if the test itself wasn't very good. This is one of the ways to ensure a test will be legally defensible - have every new employee take it, but don't hire them based on it. Then see if the personality test scores correlate with their job performance (usually as measured by supervisors) at some time later.

more than 5 years ago
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Personality Testing For Employment

RichDiesal From an Industrial Psychologist (581 comments)

There is no spiritual ancestry in modern personality testing with the MBTI - it lacks the psychometric properties required of tests these days (reliability and validity). It is still used because the creators still want to make money off of it. Few industrial psychologists with any decent statistical training would be caught dead using it.
 
An example of a modern personality test that is currently used (and has been successfully legally defended) is the NEO-PI-R. Scores on several scales in this measure have been demonstrated to correlate with job performance across a variety of jobs.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Study: People That Think Social Media Helps Their Work Are Probably Wrong

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  about 7 months ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "In an upcoming special issue of Social Science Computer Review, researchers set out to understand how people actually use social media while at work and how it affects their job performance. By polling workers across 17 industries, they identified 8 broad ways that people use social media that they believe help their work, and 9 broad ways that people use social media that they believe harm their work. Although the harmful social media behaviors were related to decreased job performance, the beneficial social media behaviors were unrelated to job performance. In short, wasting time on social media hurts you, but trying to use social media to improve your work probably doesn't actually help."
Link to Original Source
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When You Are Popular on Facebook, People Think You're Attractive

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  about 9 months ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "In an upcoming issue of the Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, researchers conducted an experiment on the impact of the number of Facebook friends a person has on impression formation. When viewing modified Facebook profiles (all with the same profile picture and an experimentally controlled number of friends), people rated profiles with lots of Facebook friends as more physically attractive, more socially attractive, more approachable, and more extroverted. Since potential employers look at Facebook profiles these days, perhaps it's time to hire some Facebook friends."
Link to Original Source
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NSF Report Flawed; Americans Do Not Believe Astrology is Scientific

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  about 9 months ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "A new report from the National Science Foundation, reported a few days ago right here on Slashdot, states that roughly 40% of Americans believe astrology to be scientific. But this is in fact false; most of those apparently astrology-loving Americans have actually confused astrology with astronomy. In a 100-person Mechanical Turk study with a $5 research budget, I verified this by actually asking people to define astrology. Among those that correctly defined astrology, only 10% believe it to be scientific; among those that confused astrology for astronomy, 92% believe "astrology" to be scientific. Apparently US science education is not so far behind the Chinese after all."
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The Privacy Paradox: Why People Who Complain About Privacy Also Overshare

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  about 10 months ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "Researchers have recently been examining a phenomenon called the privacy paradox, which describes how social media users report that they are concerned about their privacy but do very little to actively protect it. In a new study, two personality traits were found to drive sharing: a person’s desire to talk about themselves to others regardless of context as well as the degree to which people found social media to be relevant to their personal social lives. So as it turns out, many people do want it both ways: they want to enrich their social lives by talking about themselves online to anyone who will listen, but they also don’t want this information to be read by just anyone. This implies that teaching people how to safeguard their information alone isn’t generally going to improve the privacy of their data; the human desire to share with others is too strong."
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How MOOC Faculty Exploit People's Desire to Learn

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  1 year,4 days

RichDiesal (655968) writes "Just as businesses try to make something off of massively online open courses (MOOCs), so do the faculty running them. But instead of seeking money, MOOC faculty seek something far more valuable: a cheap source of data for social science research. Unfortunately, the rights of research participants are sometimes ignored in MOOCs, and succesful completion of courses are sometimes held hostage in exchange for mandatory participation in research, as in this case study of a Coursera MOOC. Such behavior is not tolerated in "real" college courses, so why is it tolerated in MOOCs taught by the same faculty?"
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20-Somethings Think It's OK to Text and Answer Calls in Business Meetings

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  1 year,20 days

RichDiesal (655968) writes "In an upcoming article in Business Communication Quarterly, researchers found that more than half of 20-somethings believe it appropriate to read texts during formal business meetings, whereas only 16% of workers 40+ believe the same thing. 34% of 20-somethings believe it appropriate to answer the phone in the middle of a meeting (i.e., not excusing yourself to answer the phone — answering and talking mid-meeting!). It is unclear if this is happening because more younger workers grew up with mobile technology, or if it's because older workers have the experience to know that answering a call in the middle of a meeting is a terrible idea. So if you’re a younger worker, consider leaving your phone alone in meetings to avoid annoying your coworkers. And if you’re an older worker annoyed at what you believe to be rude behavior, just remember, it’s not you – it’s them!"
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Online Tool to Determine if You Are Addicted to Online Games

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "Problematic online gaming is related to low self-esteem, depression, and other negative consequences to your psychological health. On this webpage, you can complete the 12-question Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire and get an assessment of your own addiction. After you submit your answers, additional analysis of your responses will appear comparing you to the sample collected by the research team and indicating your risk factors. The data is collected and analyzed solely via Javascript, so rest assured that the extent of your addiction will remain known only to you."
Link to Original Source
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Textual Harassment at Work: Romance and Sexual Harassment on Social Media

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "Textual harassment, which is sexual harassment occurring via social media, is on the rise and potentially a nightmare for human resources professionals. In traditional sexual harassment, human resource professionals can generally assume that the harassment they are concerned with takes place within the boundaries of the office. However, just as social media blur the line between “work” and “not work”, textual harassment blurs the responsibilities of HR regarding sexual harassment. If an employee makes a comment that is perceived as harassing via social media to another employee, is it the organization’s responsibility to act?"
Link to Original Source
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Ask Slashdot: Best Programming Text for PhD Social Scientists?

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  about 2 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "I teach Ph.D. students in the social sciences. One of the skills that I bring to our department is that I have a background in programming, which is becoming increasingly important both for academics conducting research studies and for practitioners working in the field, although few programs yet recognize this. To pass on this knowledge, I recently taught a class to Ph.D. students in programming based primarily on my own experience. Although this mostly works, I "learned by doing", and this doesn't translate perfectly to the classroom. So I'd like to provide a more comprehensive/better introduction to programming, which starts with a good text. An important outcome of this class needs to be a deliverable: students needs to be able to come out in one semester with a sufficient grasp of PHP/MySQL to code surveys and basic experiments (think random assignment of signups to a couple of different conditions, who are treated slightly differently). So we can't spend a whole lot of time on theory, although the fundamentals certainly need to be there. Also tricky: some of the students come in with basic programming experience through conducting statistical analyses in R, but others are essentially frightened of computers — so it's a WIDE range of abilities to work with. Any suggestions would be appreciated!"
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Lack of Sleep Leads to Wasted Time on the Internet at Work

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 2 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "In a new paper appearing in the Journal of Applied Psychology, Wagner, Barnes, Lim and Ferris investigate the link between lack of sleep and the amount of time that employees will spend wasting time on the Internet while at work – a phenomenon called cyberloafing. Using two studies – one using historical search data collected from Google Insights and another using a sample of undergraduates, Wagner and colleagues found that those who sleep less are more likely to cyberloaf the next day. They also found an interaction such that highly conscientious people were less likely to cyberloaf after a night of interrupted, poor quality sleep than less conscientious people."
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Facebook's Bad For You But Good For Me

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 2 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "Research recently published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking reveals that on average, people perceive Facebook to negatively affect other people, but do not believe themselves to be affected in the same way. Student participants believed the privacy of others was reduced due to Facebook use, but did not perceive their own privacy to be affected. They also perceived later job opportunities for other people to be decreased due to a Facebook use, but did not perceive a decrease in opportunities for themselves."
Link to Original Source
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LinkedIn Profiles Contain Fewer Lies Than Resumes

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 2 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "New research reveals that personal information provided on LinkedIn may contain fewer deceptions about prior work experience and prior work responsibilities than traditional resumes. However, LinkedIn profiles contain more deceptions about personal interests and hobbies. This researchers believe this may be because participants are equally motivated to deceive employers in both settings, but perceive lies about work experience on LinkedIn as more easily verifiable."
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Should You Hire BlazinWeedClown@Mail.Com?

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 2 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "E-mail addresses from a group of 14,718 people who had applied for entry-level jobs in manufacturing were examined for their appropriateness. The researchers found that roughly 25% of job applicant e-mail addresses were inappropriate or antisocial, and that the level of inappropriateness predicted several qualities of interest to hiring managers. Applicants with inappropriate e-mail addresses tended to be less conscientiousness, less professional, and had less work-related experience than those with appropriate e-mail addresses."
Link to Original Source
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The IKEA Effect: Why We Love Things We Build

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 2 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "The IKEA Effect refers to the tendency for people to value things they have created/built themselves more than if made by someone else – in fact, nearly as much as if an expert with much greater skill had created the same item. Is this the reason that open source software proponents are so “enthusiastic” about their products while the general market resists them – because those proponents had a hand in developing them?"
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61.9% of Undergraduates Cybercheat

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 3 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "A recent study of 1222 undergraduates found that 61.9% of them "cybercheat," which involves using the Internet illicitly to get higher grades. Some of the quotes from students are a bit troubling. As one 19-year-old engineering student put it, "As more and more people are using the Internet illegally (i.e. limewire etc.), I feel that the chances of being caught or the consequences of my actions are almost insignificant. So I feel no pressure in doing what ever everybody else is doing/using the Internet for.""
Link to Original Source
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Virtual Attractiveness Changes How You're Treated

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 4 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "If you’re physically attractive, the world simply treats you better. You’re more trusted. People think you’re competent. You have more freedom to act as you please. The list goes on. This reflects something called the physical attractiveness stereotype – people lacking any other information tend to believe that beautiful people have other traits that they (or their culture) find attractive. This is both commonsense and an empirically supported finding. No one will argue – the pretty people have it all (even if they don’t deserve it!).

But what about virtual attractiveness? In an online virtual world, people have complete control over the appearance of their avatars. They can look however they want; I choose a tall man in a snappy black suit with a pretty slick haircut. Do people react to the attractiveness of virtual people the same way they react to real people?

The short answer: Yes, they do. People respond more positively to more attractive avatars, regardless of the real person underneath. And particularly relevant to the Slashdot crowd, putting a women in an attractive avatar will lead her to seek out more virtual men than when she's in an unattractive avatar. So be careful when that hottie starts chatting you up."

Link to Original Source
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Violent Video Games for a Release That Never Comes

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 4 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "A recent article in Psychological Science investigates the use of violent video games by people to experience catharsis — a "release" associated with pent-up aggressive energy. They found that when angered, people are more likely to seek violent video games (academic article behind a paywall) for an emotional release, despite the fact that playing violent video games does not seem to actually provide that release.

If you’re not familiar with the idea of catharsis, consider this quote from a participant in the study: “How could I squelch the urge to set my manager on fire if I couldn’t set people on fire in video games?”"

Link to Original Source
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Using Augmented Reality to Treat Cockroach Phobia

RichDiesal RichDiesal writes  |  more than 4 years ago

RichDiesal (655968) writes "In this blog post, I describe a new use for augmented reality — treating people for cockroach phobia. A recent paper in the academic journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking discusses a system where people suffering from cockroach phobia sit at a desk with a virtual reality headset. The headset has a camera on the front so that patients see the desk they're sitting at — but covered in cockroaches. In the study, researchers managed to elicit a fear response to virtual cockroaches similar to what would be experienced with real cockroaches. Sounds like a little slice of hell to me."

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