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Comments

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OpenSSL Cleanup: Hundreds of Commits In a Week

Richard_at_work Re:I would think (169 comments)

As the other poster says, OpenSSL isn't an OpenBSD project - what is going on here is a full blown fork of OpenSSL by the OpenBSD team, who are putting their money where their mouths are because when the heartbleed bug came out it was noted that the issue could have been mitigated on OpenBSD if the OpenSSL team had used the system provided memory allocation resources.

So this is less OpenSSL and much more OpenBSD SSL being created.

4 hours ago
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Declassified Papers Hint US Uranium May Have Ended Up In Israeli Arms

Richard_at_work Re:Someone call Ben Affleck (136 comments)

South Africa gave up its nuclear program after the fall of the apartheid regime.

yesterday
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Declassified Papers Hint US Uranium May Have Ended Up In Israeli Arms

Richard_at_work Re:Someone call Ben Affleck (136 comments)

Theres a lot of evidence linking the Israelis to the South African nuclear weapons program with a lot of people thinking it was a "legitimatised" nuclear program that would only get SA into trouble internationally while Israel could walk away with a lot of improvements scot free, so if US technology and material ended up in Israeli hands, then I have no doubt equally that some of it then made its way on to apartheid South Africa.

yesterday
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Click Like? You May Have Given Up the Right To Sue

Richard_at_work Re:so? (214 comments)

It stood up where there was an actual contract or financially backed transaction in place, not just off the back of a random click on a website.

2 days ago
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The Security of Popular Programming Languages

Richard_at_work Re:ASP? (188 comments)

Classic ASP doesn't run on .NET, it was pre-.NET.

4 days ago
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The Security of Popular Programming Languages

Richard_at_work Re:ASP? (188 comments)

There are also non-ASP.Net MVC frameworks based on .NET, like NancyFX, so the .NET category seems to very very wide. At a guess I'm going to assume the same for Java, as its really the same situation.

4 days ago
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Bill Would End US Govt's Sale of Already-Available Technical Papers To Itself

Richard_at_work Re:Bad idea? (32 comments)

If the NTIS cannot charge for their service any longer for particular documents, they should stop providing those documents - or are they legally bound to supply the service regardless?

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Which NoSQL Database For New Project?

Richard_at_work Re:Do you need a database? (272 comments)

I think many people get stuck in thinking "one single database, thats it, my initial decision condemns me forever", when in-fact theres no shame in having many databases.

Stick the raw data into one database, choose the database that suits that.

Transform the data from the raw database into something you can use day to day, thats well structured etc, choose the database for that.

Transform the data from the day to day schemas into something that more suitable for archiving and long term reporting, again choose the database for that.

You don't have to have one single database type, every particular one has its strengths, so use them!

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Which NoSQL Database For New Project?

Richard_at_work Re:Do you need a database? (272 comments)

Theres probably an element of multithreaded access that needs to be taken into consideration here - writing to a single text file may get you into issues if the receiving webserver is multithreaded, meaning the threads will either have to queue for write locks, or write to a different file.

Database engines don't have this issue, so while it may be overkill, there may be reasons to have one irregardless.

about two weeks ago
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Should Microsoft Give Kids Programmable Versions of Office?

Richard_at_work Re:Microsoft teaches you to be a bad neighbour (226 comments)

The four freedoms are *your* ideal to aspire to, never forget that :) I'm all for people releasing their source code, if they want to - however, I don't feel people should be vilified purely because they choose not to.

about two weeks ago
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Should Microsoft Give Kids Programmable Versions of Office?

Richard_at_work Re:Microsoft teaches you to be a bad neighbour (226 comments)

Why does everyone in the world have to conform to your ideology? Those freedoms are part of your ideology, nothing more.

about two weeks ago
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Should Microsoft Give Kids Programmable Versions of Office?

Richard_at_work Re:No. (226 comments)

Why "full" copies of Visual Studio? What does the Express editions lack that kids would need? They have access to the full capabilities of the .Net framework, a full C/C++ environment and more - the Express editions really lack the surrounding IDE features that would be lost that early on in the developer learning curve, stuff like profiling etc.

about two weeks ago
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Should Microsoft Be Required To Extend Support For Windows XP?

Richard_at_work Re:An Alternative Law (650 comments)

We still have to work around issues in newer browsers, and not just IE either :(

about two weeks ago
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The Verge: Google Is Working on a TV Box Of Its Own

Richard_at_work Re:Microsoft no show (117 comments)

And yet on my Xbox360 I've been able to play games, movies, TV shows, access streaming services and live video for five years. How is that late to the game?

about two weeks ago
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Most Expensive Aviation Search: $53 Million To Find Flight MH370

Richard_at_work Re:But Terrizm! (233 comments)

The issue with AF447 is that they disregarded *all* instrument readings, not just the ones they were trained to in the event of an air data mismatch. So they never even realised they were in danger, because they didn't think the rapidly declining numbers were true - remember that the descent was 1G, so they didn't even have any feeling of descent, which added to their mistrust of the data they had infront of them.

So as the other poster said, there was nothing to call someone about other than they didn't know what was going on, and they weren't about to admit that to everyone listening.

about two weeks ago
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UK Government Pays Microsoft £5.5M For Extended Support of Windows XP

Richard_at_work Re: TCO (341 comments)

You must be so warped with hatred, because your posts are starting to become incoherent.

The legal issue of "reasonableness" is well tested, and it doesn't go your way (fortunately). Software cannot wear out, but the Sales of Goods Act is not about forcing an entity to support anything until it wears out, its about ensuring the product lasts for a reasonable period of time - so your car doesn't die catastrophically in two years time, so your fridge doesn't stop working a year from now, so you know that when you invest a significant sum of money into something, it can last a reasonable period of time.

13 years is a reasonable time, as is 6. And the software doesn't stop working after the EOL date, it just won't receive updates, so it hasn't even "worn out".

Its also worth noting that software does not necessarily fall under the Sales of Goods Act, or its amendments - case law in the UK provides for it as a per-case consideration, and not a standard entitlement.

http://www.mablaw.com/2011/03/...

So even "sticking to legislation" shows you to be full of crap.

about two weeks ago
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UK Government Pays Microsoft £5.5M For Extended Support of Windows XP

Richard_at_work Re: TCO (341 comments)

I'm afraid its actually *you* who is full of shit in this case, as the Sales of Goods Act 1979 and its amendments are precisely what I am referring to, and as I have intimate knowledge of that act and its various legal successes, I can safely say that you are full of bollocks.

The Sales of Goods Act is not meant to cover a product for all eternity, for an indefinite period, until the product actually wears out or for any other purpose than to require a manufacturer to provide a reasonable life span for the product in question. The Sales of Goods Act is not even intended to require a manufacturer to fix bugs or issues past the reasonable period of support, just provide a reasonable period of support.

So lets see what other Operating Systems have endured longer than Windows XP...

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 2.1 - released in mid-2002, died in mid-2009.
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 - released in late-2003, died at the start of this year.
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 - released in early-2005, dies at the end of this year.

Ubuntu 6.06 LTS - released mid-2006, died mid-2011.
Ubuntu 8.04 LTS - released mid-2008, died mid-2013.

OSX 10.1 - released late-2001, died mid-2002.
OSX 10.2 - released mid-2002, died mid-2003.
OSX 10.3 - released late-2003, died mid-2005.
OSX 10.4 - released mid-2005, died late-2007.
OSX 10.5 - released late-2006, died late-2009.
OSX 10.6 - released mid-2009, died late-2011.
OSX 10.7 - released mid-2010, died late-2012.
OSX 10.8 - released mid-2012, death TBD.

Hmm, I can't see any other consumer or corporate desktop OS that has been supported as long as XP has.

So out of all other reasonable time periods for Operating Systems, XP's support length is definitely an outlier and you would get laughed out of court if you tried to force Microsoft to support it beyond its current and well known EOL date.

If you are giving any sort of legal advice based around the Sales of Goods Act, please fucking stop as you have proved that you know shit about the topic.

about two weeks ago
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Tesla Model S Has Hidden Ethernet Port, User Runs Firefox On the 17" Screen

Richard_at_work Re:touch screens in cars, bad idea? (208 comments)

99.9999% of all work a fighter pilot does in normal operation is HOTAS - hands on throttle and stick. There are enough controls on those inputs, or within close reach to them, that you can operate the aircraft without ever taking your hands off them.

And while multifunctional displays are a staple in cockpits these days, they are invariably not touch screen in military aircraft.

about two weeks ago
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UK Government Pays Microsoft £5.5M For Extended Support of Windows XP

Richard_at_work Re:Why not use GNU/Linux? (341 comments)

And that relevance pales into insignificancy when you consider what you would have to replace application wise, as in the real world people dont just boot to a desktop and then sit and stare at it for their working day.

Office applications might be easy to replace, but how about certified xray or MRI viewers, medical record viewers etc?

about two weeks ago
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Most Expensive Aviation Search: $53 Million To Find Flight MH370

Richard_at_work Re:But Terrizm! (233 comments)

AF447 never made any calls because the crew didn't have anything to call about, so its hardly a good example - see the Swiss flight over the North Atlantic some years ago that crashed while fighting a fire on board for ages while they diverted, they were making a load of calls about their situation.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Federal Aviation Administration To Investigate Boeing 787 after safety scares

Richard_at_work Richard_at_work writes  |  about a year ago

Richard_at_work writes "The FAA announced this morning that they were initiating an indepth investigation into both the design and construction of the Boeing 787 aircraft after several safety scares in the past few months. The Boeing 787 has been in operation for less than 2 years, but in that time it has seen fuel leaks related to build quality issues, electrical problems and a fire related to the new all-electrical approach.

The review will involve a broader investigation than those systems involved in recent scares, and is a significant event for both Boeing as the manufacturer and the FAA."

Link to Original Source
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Possible security breach at Dropbox?

Richard_at_work Richard_at_work writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Richard_at_work writes "In a thread that has now been ongoing for almost a week, the evidence has been mounting that Dropbox has possibly had a security breach, with many users reporting spam being delivered to Dropbox-only email accounts.

Dropbox has denied this so far, but with the forum thread on the issue now surpassing 250 replies with most users reporting the same sort of thing (spam email for the same "service" all coming in on email addresses only used for Dropbox, and in many cases aliases specifically created for Dropbox with no spam hitting the catch all addresses for the same domains) the likelihood is that something is going on here.

Users were first reporting it as being limited to German Dropbox users, but it has gradually spread across a fairly representative sample of users across the globe now.

With disparity of ISPs, email systems and locations involved here, could there be any other explanation?"

Link to Original Source
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Assange loses latest round in extradition fight

Richard_at_work Richard_at_work writes  |  about 2 years ago

Richard_at_work writes "After losing his appeal to the UK Supreme Court a couple of weeks ago, Assanges lawyer was given leave to seek a reopening of the case on particular grounds — the UK Supreme Court has now rejected those grounds and upheld its earlier ruling that Assanges should be extradited, which could happen in the next few days."
Link to Original Source
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AFA Director: 1st Amendment Doesn't Apply To Islam

Richard_at_work Richard_at_work writes  |  about 3 years ago

Richard_at_work (517087) writes "Bryan Fischer, Director of of Issues Analysis for the American Family Association, has come out saying that the First Amendment is a privilege and not a right when it comes to Islam, and that "The First Amendment was written by the Founders to protect the free exercise of Christianity. They were making no effort to give special protections to Islam." as well as going on to say "Islam has no fundamental First Amendment claims, for the simple reason that it was not written to protect the religion of Islam. Islam is entitled only to the religious liberty we extend to it out of courtesy. While there certainly ought to be a presumption of religious liberty for non-Christian religious traditions in America, the Founders were not writing a suicide pact when they wrote the First Amendment." Quite a fantastical claim!"
Link to Original Source
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Wow! Its been 30 years....

Richard_at_work Richard_at_work writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Richard_at_work writes "Thirty years ago today, the Big Ear radio telescope recorded a 72 second long signal that perfectly matched the expected signature of a signal that was not of local origin. This became known world wide as the 'Wow!' signal after the comment its discoverer, Dr. Jerry R. Ehman of SETI, scribbled in the margin of the print out, and while it has never been detected since, it has fueled arguments on both sides as to the existence of extraterrestrial life ever since."
Link to Original Source

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