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Comcast Pays Overdue Fees, Offers Freebies For TWC Merger Approval

Rick Zeman "Let me ask you.... (57 comments)

....just how can you be bought? And how cheaply?"

Also, shouldn't Minneapolis' club being removing the franchise for the unpaid franchise fee? If I don't pay Comcast, they turn off my cable.

5 hours ago
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Best 1990s Sci-fi show?

Rick Zeman Sliders (474 comments)

...was awesome til they got away from s/f-alternate realities and into tits and ass.

yesterday
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Google Explains Why WebView Vulnerability Will Go Unpatched On Android 4.3

Rick Zeman Re:Not to be an apologist for Google, but (555 comments)

Apple and Microsoft control their own update process on all platforms; Google does not. It's the individual carriers who are getting in the way of Android updates.

And who entered into the contracts with carriers saying who is responsible for what? Google can't dodge some form of culpability for this.

2 days ago
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Inside Ford's New Silicon Valley Lab

Rick Zeman They need help (39 comments)

Ford's voice recognition in the MyFord Touch sucks more than a porn star.

2 days ago
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NVIDIA Responds To GTX 970 Memory Bug

Rick Zeman Re:Hey! I've been gypped! (145 comments)

Tell us where they lied - the card has 4GB of memory in one bank, its logically separated out internally when used by the cards processor. But it still has 4GB of memory.

They just need to run himem.sys with the right parameters.....

3 days ago
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Verizon About To End Construction of Its Fiber Network

Rick Zeman Solution (199 comments)

Open up those unserved (or even served) areas to municipal fiber, google fiber, Comcrap, AT&T, or Bob's Bait Shop and Networking.

4 days ago
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Apple Agrees To Chinese Security Audits of Its Products

Rick Zeman Re:I don't think it's really a security audit (114 comments)

The Chinese is most likely doing this as a response to the US banning ZTE and Huawei telecom products in the US. The US government is accusing ZTE and Huawei of building backdoors and other security concerns into their hardware, so China wants to hit back with something equally annoying. China is basically saying that's cool, we can screw with your companies too. Especially since China is a huge market to cell phone makers that most US companies have yet to really tap into. And with a huge growing middle class, the amount of profit for products like iPhone and Android based phones is huge. China is basically holding the iPhone hostage to get better treatment of its companies outside of China.

The problem with that is the Chinese market craves iPhones and the US market couldn't care less about ZTE and Huawei products. All that'll do is piss off the Chinese with disposable incomes, "the growing middle class" and Chinese leaders will get voted out of office.

Oh wait. It's a dictatorship.

5 days ago
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Apple Agrees To Chinese Security Audits of Its Products

Rick Zeman So is the converse true? (114 comments)

Can the US demand to security audit any Chinese product? Can we demand to see the source/firmware of, say, Huwai routers?

5 days ago
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Republican Bill Aims To Thwart the FCC's Leaning Towards Title II

Rick Zeman Re:I doubt the Republicans wrote it... (182 comments)

U.S. congressional Republicans on Friday proposed legislation that would set "net neutrality" rules for broadband providers, aiming to head off tougher regulations backed by the Obama administration.

That sentence should have read, U.S. congressional Republicans on Friday proposed legislation authored by industry lobbyists, that would set "net neutrality" rules for broadband providers, aiming to head off tougher regulations backed by the Obama administration. (additions mine).

Your additions were a given.

about two weeks ago
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Why Run Linux On Macs?

Rick Zeman Re:MkLinux is pretty good (591 comments)

No offense, ninnle linux, but mklinux is pretty good. It's linux on top of the mach microkernel. (Think of it as a "fuck you" to gnu/hurd, though that's not why it exists :-). Since it's sponsored by Apple, it works better on Apple hardware than the stock linux kernel. Maybe now that Linux is using OS X and Sublime Text for linux development, we'll get better Macintosh support in the mainline kernel? Anyhow, mklinux is pretty cool.

I see what you're trying to do here....

about two weeks ago
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Ridley Scott Adapts Philip K. Dick's 'Man in the High Castle' For Amazon

Rick Zeman What happened to 2013's winners? (94 comments)

Amazon is promising customers that they've assembled "some of the greatest storytellers in the businesswith works of novelty and passion."

I'm still waiting for the Harry Bosch show starring Titus Welliver that "won" in 2013. Hello, Amazon?

about two weeks ago
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Steam For Linux Bug Wipes Out All of a User's Files

Rick Zeman Not the first time (329 comments)

Apple had a bug like that in the iTunes installer sometime back that did exactly that: a rm -rf from root as root. Theirs came from if you had a space in your hard drive name.

about two weeks ago
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Ad Company Using Verizon Tracking Header To Recreate Deleted Cookies

Rick Zeman Simple(r) answer (70 comments)

"So, what’s a Verizon subscriber to do?,"

Dump Verizon.

about two weeks ago
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Radio Shack Reported To Be Ready for Bankruptcy Filing

Rick Zeman Old geeks are crying (314 comments)

If anything proves the commoditization of hardware, the death of Radio Shacks proves it. What was once a vital lifeline is...nothing. Personally, my last straw was when they insisted that I give full contact info...while paying with cash, and that was only an emergency purchase of batteries, not anything esoteric. Eff that. They won't be missed; they've been dead for years anyway.

about two weeks ago
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How To Hijack Your Own Windows System With Bundled Downloads

Rick Zeman Re:yeah well, (324 comments)

To be fair, since download.com and entire CNET is actively involved in pushing malware, I wouldn't be surprised if any non-Windows downloads they might offer would try to push malware as well.

Once CNet acquired VersionTracker (Mac software site that'd been around forever), they tried their substitute installer bit. I don't know how successful they were as I've never been back using http://www.macupdate.com/ instead.

about two weeks ago
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Closure On the Linux Lockup Bug

Rick Zeman Re:"him and John Stultz continue ..." (115 comments)

"... him and John Stultz continue to back and forth ..."

What in the world is happening, editors?

The only editors on slashdot are some vi's, some pines, and a couple of notepads and textedit. Certainly, no human editors....

about three weeks ago
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Study: 15 Per Cent of Business Cloud Users Have Been Hacked

Rick Zeman Re:It's a lie! (72 comments)

Remember the literal definition of the cloud: "Someone else's server."

about three weeks ago
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Sony Thinks You'll Pay $1200 For a Digital Walkman

Rick Zeman Re:Ha (391 comments)

Maybe they should talk to their friends in Sony Music about the Loudness War first before going on about music purity.

I never knew there was a wiki article on this phenomenon--thanks! I tend to look at "Digitally Remastered" on an older title to be analogous to" Fair Warning."

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Stop And Sieze

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about 5 months ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "The Washington Post has an expose on the post-9/11 inderction/seizure industry that's been created on America's highways", saying, "Behind the rise in seizures is a little-known cottage industry of private police-training firms that teach the techniques of “highway interdiction” to departments across the country.

One of those firms created a private intelligence network known as Black Asphalt Electronic Networking & Notification System that enabled police nationwide to share detailed reports about American motorists — criminals and the innocent alike — including their Social Security numbers, addresses and identifying tattoos, as well as hunches about which drivers to stop.

Many of the reports have been funneled to federal agencies and fusion centers as part of the government’s burgeoning law enforcement intelligence systems — despite warnings from state and federal authorities that the information could violate privacy and constitutional protections.""
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How Big Telecom Smothers Municipal Broadband

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about 4 months ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "The Center for Public Integrity has a comprehensive article showing how Big Telecom (aka, AT&T, Comcast, Charter, Time Warner) use lobbyists, paid-for politicians, and lawsuits (both actual and the threat thereof) in their efforts to kill municipal broadband. From the article: "The companies have also used traditional campaign tactics such as newspaper ads, push polls, direct mail and door-to-door canvassing to block municipal networks. And they’ve tried to undermine the appetite for municipal broadband by paying for research from think tanks and front groups to portray the networks as unreliable and costly. " Unfortunately, those think tanks and front groups are also paid for by the companies."
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars?

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about 5 months ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "Wired has an interesting article on the possibility of selectable ethical choices in robotic autonomous cars.

From the article: The way this would work is one customer may set the car (which he paid for) to jealously value his life over all others; another user may prefer that the car values all lives the same and minimizes harm overall; yet another may want to minimize legal liability and costs for herself; and other settings are possible.
Philosophically, this opens up an interesting debate about the oft-clashing ideas of morality vs. liability."
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Lawyer Sues Apple For His Own Porn Addiction

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "Hot on the heels of an attorney suing Apple for a dollar because he couldn't be bothered to know if his device was High Definition-capable or not, comes the amusing tale of another attorney suing Apple because they didn't protect him from his porn addiction. The semi-literate 50 page complaint alleges that Apple is culpable "...for making devices that can display porn" and, containing one of the most amazing sentences to ever appear on the Internet claims that Apple is guilty of:
"UNFAIR COMPETITION AND INTERFERENCE OF THE MARITAL CONTRACT:
The Plaintiff became totally out of synch in his romantic relationship with his wife, which was a consequence of his use of his Apple product. The Plaintiff began desiring, younger more beautiful girls featured in porn videos than his wife, who was no longer 21. His failed marriage caused the Plaintiff to experience emotional distress to the point of hospitalization. The Plaintiff could no longer tell the difference between internet pornography and tangible intercourse due to the content he accessed through the Apple products, which failed to provide him with warnings of the dangers of online pornography whatsoever."
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US Postal Service Scanning Mail

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "While the NSA's privacy violations are in the news, the New York Times reports on a lower tech version of the same concept performed by the US Postal Service. From the article: "Mr. Pickering was targeted by a longtime surveillance system called mail covers, but that is only a forerunner of a vastly more expansive effort, the Mail Isolation Control and Tracking program, in which Postal Service computers photograph the exterior of every piece of paper mail that is processed in the United States — about 160 billion pieces last year. It is not known how long the government saves the images." and "For mail cover requests, law enforcement agencies simply submit a letter to the Postal Service, which can grant or deny a request without judicial review. Law enforcement officials say the Postal Service rarely denies a request. In other government surveillance program, such as wiretaps, a federal judge must sign off on the requests." In other words, the USPS is capturing the metadata off of every piece of mail mailed in the US...but with even less oversight than the FISA courts provide over the NSA."
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NSA's Role In Terror Cases Concealed From Defense Lawyers

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes ""Confidentiality is critical to national security." So wrote the Justice Department in concealing the NSA's role in two wiretap cases. However, now that the NSA is under the gun, it's apparently not, according to New York attorney Joshua Dratel: “National security is about keeping illegal conduct concealed from the American public until you’re forced to justify it because someone ratted you out" as the first he heard of the NSA's role in his client's case was "....when [FBI deputy director Sean] Joyce disclosed it on CSPAN to argue for the effectiveness of the NSA’s spying.
Dratel challenged the legality of the spying in 2011, and asked a federal judge to order the government to produce the wiretap application the FBI gave the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to justify the surveillance.
“Disclosure of the FISA applications to defense counsel – who possess the requisite security clearance – is also necessary to an accurate determination of the legality of the FISA surveillance, as otherwise the defense will be completely in the dark with respect to the basis for the FISA surveillance,” wrote Dratel.

The government fought the request in a remarkable 60-page reply, some of it redacted as classified in the public docket. The Justice Department argued that the defendants had no right to see any of the filings from the secret court, and instead the judge could review the filings alone in chambers. “Confidentiality is critical to national security,” the government wrote."
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State Photo-ID databases Mined By Police

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "Showing once again that once a privacy door is opened every law enforcement agency will run through it, The Washington Post details how state drivers license photo databases are being mined by various LEOs in their states--and out. From the article: "[L]aw enforcement use of such facial searches is blurring the traditional boundaries between criminal and non-criminal databases, putting images of people never arrested in what amount to perpetual digital lineups. The most advanced systems allow police to run searches from laptop computers in their patrol cars and offer access to the FBI and other federal authorities.

Such open access has caused a backlash in some of the few states where there has been a public debate. As the databases grow larger and increasingly connected across jurisdictional boundaries, critics warn that authorities are developing what amounts to a national identification system — based on the distinct geography of each human face.""
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US Mining Data Directly from 9+ Silicon Valley Companies

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "Hot on the heels of Verizon's massive data dump to NSA comes news of "PRISM" where The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio, video, photographs, e-mails, documents and connection logs that enable analysts to track a person’s movements and contacts over time."
This program, established in 2007, includes major companies such as Apple, Microsoft, Yahoo, Google, Facebook...and more."
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Verizon Ordered To Provide All Customer Data to NSA

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "According to Wired, an order by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court "...requires Verizon to give the NSA metadata on all calls within the U.S. and between the U.S. and foreign countries on an “ongoing, daily basis” for three months. Unlike orders in years past, there's not even the pretense that one of the parties needed to be in a foreign country. It is unknown (but likely) that other carriers are under the same order."
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Fragmentation Leads To Android Insecurities

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about 2 years ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "The Washington Post writes about how vendor fragmentation leads to security vulnerabilities and other exploits. This situation is "...making the world’s most popular mobile operating system more vulnerable than its rivals to hackers, scam artists and a growing universe of malicious software" unlike Apple's iOS which they note has widely available updates several times a year. In light of many companies' Bring Your Own Device initiatives “You have potentially millions of Androids making their way into the work space, accessing confidential documents,” said Christopher Soghoian, a former Federal Trade Commission technology expert who now works for the American Civil Liberties Union. “It’s like a really dry forest, and it’s just waiting for a match.”"
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Chinese Hack New York Times

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  about 2 years ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "According to a headline article in the New York Times, they admit to being hacked by the Chinese, and covers the efforts of Mandiant to investigate, and then to eradicate their custom Advanced Persistent Threats (APT). This was alleged to be in reaction to an article which details the sleazy business dealings of the family of Wen Jiabao, China's newest Prime Minister.
China’s Ministry of National Defense said in denial, “Chinese laws prohibit any action including hacking that damages Internet security.” Do note that it says they don't prohibit hacking, and also note that a business being hacked doesn't "damage[s] Internet security.""
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"Immaterial goods turn out...equally immaterial income"

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "This quote, in an article in Pitchfork, says Damon Krukowski of Galaxie 500 and Damon & Naomi breaking down the income stream (puddle?) generated by both Pandora and Spotify. He observes, "As businesses, Pandora and Spotify are divorced from music. To me, it's a short logical step to observe that they are doing nothing for the business of music-- except undermining the simple cottage industry of pressing ideas onto vinyl, and selling them for more than they cost to manufacture." and that he has "...simply stopped looking to these business models to do anything for me financially as a musician." In addition, he posits that they purely exist to collect speculative capital to enrich their owners."
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Power And The Internet

Rick Zeman Rick Zeman writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Rick Zeman (15628) writes "The New York Times has extensively surveyed and analyzed data center power usage and patterns.
At their behest, the consulting firm McKinsey & Company analyzed energy use by data centers and found that, on average they were using only 6 percent to 12 percent of the electricity powering their servers to perform computations. The rest was essentially used to keep servers idling and ready in case of a surge in activity that could slow or crash their operations. "Worldwide, the digital warehouses use about 30 billion watts of electricity, roughly equivalent to the output of 30 nuclear power plants." In other words, “A single data center can take more power than a medium-size town.” This is the price being paid to ensure everyone has instant access to every email they've ever received, or for their instant Facebook status update. Data Center providers are finding that they can't rack servers fast enough to provide for users' needs: “It is absolutely a race between our ability to create data and our ability to store and manage data,” Mr. Burton said.
A few companies say they are using extensively re-engineered software and cooling systems to decrease wasted power. Among them are Facebook and Google, which also have redesigned their hardware. Still, according to recent disclosures, Google’s data centers consume nearly 300 million watts and Facebook’s about 60 million watts.
Many of these solutions are readily available, but in a risk-averse industry, most companies have been reluctant to make wholesale change, according to industry experts."

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