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Comments

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Surprise! More Than Twice As Much Mercury In Environment As Thought

RockDoctor Re: #1 Source of Environmental Mercury = Gold Mini (173 comments)

Ah, got you. Still needs appreciable power, but being a continuous load, that's not a major issue. The water makers on board are RO too, feeding and washing a couple of hundred (very) sweaty bodies. But for big fresh water requirements (hundreds of cu. m. ) we bring in non-potable water on one of the flotilla boats.

8 hours ago
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To Really Cut Emissions, We Need Electric Buses, Not Just Electric Cars

RockDoctor Re:Lacking data (485 comments)

This doesn't surprise me.

Personally, I prefer to use the bus and catch up my reading when I go into town. Otherwise, I walk to the shops and back.

yesterday
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To Really Cut Emissions, We Need Electric Buses, Not Just Electric Cars

RockDoctor Re:And low-emission transport trucks, too (485 comments)

You are right about the rain that falls on the ocean but I don't see how you're right when the rain falls on the land.

There is a lot more (About 3 times) area of ocean as there is land. And, as pointed out elsewhere, bunker oil is normally not burned until you're well out to sea, for precisely this reason. It's a perfectly good reason. Which is already covered.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: What Smartwatch Apps Could You See Yourself Using?

RockDoctor Excellent anti-advert (471 comments)

and coach you continuously to improve your fitness.

I'd vaguely got the idea that these things were about health-Nazi-ism. Thanks for confirming that.

[Adverts for "smart watch, crumpled into ball, fly across room and ... bounce out of the rubbish bin.] Balls! I'll pick them up later.

yesterday
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Text While Driving In Long Island and Have Your Phone Disabled

RockDoctor Re:It should be (363 comments)

It should be the car that is disabled

That was pretty much my thought too. There should be fewer problems with coupling an app on a phone to a particular car - say by the same sort of link as used in BlueTooth - and if the phone comes out of screen-saver, then the engine drops through the gears, puts on the hazard lights and horn, and then shuts down. Once the phone is back in screen-lock state, then the car's engine can be re-started.

It'd still be vulnerable to a driver who wants to text using a passenger's phone. But that's going to be a comparatively small problem, largely because it requires two idiotic self-centred narcissistic morons to be in the same car at the same time.

May be able to adjust it IF you've got laws allowing use of a hands-free mobile as a speech phone to put that as another engine-allowed state.

yesterday
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3 Short Walking Breaks Can Reverse Harm From 3 Hours of Sitting

RockDoctor Re:You should see (154 comments)

He's using Scotch Tape. It's many criss-crossed horizontal and vertical bands in multiple colours.

yesterday
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Surprising Result of NYC Bike Lanes: Faster Traffic for Cars

RockDoctor parking lane ???? (213 comments)

You use precious road space for PARKING on? What the fuck? That's a problem for the buildings that people are going into to attend to.

yesterday
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John Romero On Reinventing the Shooter

RockDoctor Re:Please retire... (266 comments)

Romero is right. Good quality entertaining FPS have been thin on the ground lately.

Doom stopped working ?

My copy is still working.

yesterday
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Comcast Using JavaScript Injection To Serve Ads On Public Wi-Fi Hotspots

RockDoctor Re:JavaScript (230 comments)

It's annoying enough when it's just me, but my parents/wife/family respond, "This website is broken, your setup drives me nuts, I just want things to work."

Then disable disabling javascript for their users and keep their accounts in a sandbox, or on separate machines. If it's your network, and they've authorised you to manage security, backups and hardware then they get what you decide. Or they get to manage it themselves.

They do understand binary?

yesterday
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Apparent Meteorite Hits Managua, Nicaragua, Leaving Crater But No Injuries

RockDoctor Re:Taste like chicken? (107 comments)

I've forgotten what signature I'm using. Is it still the birds ARE one?

Evidently, yes. Appropriate. I haven't changed it for several years.

It's like asking if Ronald Reagan is more closely related to Emperor Hirohito, Osama bin Laden, Otzi the Iceman, or Barak Obama.

I suppose I should add an Australian Aborigine and an Amerindian to that list, just to even out the range supplied. Let's say Montezuma (he of the Revenge, for the Amerind) and Ernie Dingo (an Australian Aboriginal TV character, according to my Australian colleague).

yesterday
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Apparent Meteorite Hits Managua, Nicaragua, Leaving Crater But No Injuries

RockDoctor Re:Taste like chicken? (107 comments)

If more sequences have been published since 2007, then perhaps we could get a better idea of which modern bird T-rex is most closely related to,

On skeletal structure grounds, T.rex has been considered a sister group to all birds since the 1960s or so. On the basis of it's forearm structure, T.rex is a theropod dinosaur, but probably not a maniraptorinan theropod dinosaur. All birds however are considered maniraptorian theropod dinosaurs.

We don't have a good understanding of the initial evolutionary radiation of the birds, between approximately the early Late Jurassic and mid-Late Cretaceous, when we find evidence of the early roots of some modern bird groups such as the ratites. There's no particular reason to think that any modern bird is more closely related to T.rex than any other. There probably is one such, but we don't have (and are very unlikely to ever get) enough evidence to really be sure of the family tree to that degree of accuracy. It's like asking if Ronald Reagan is more closely related to Emperor Hirohito, Osama bin Laden, Otzi the Iceman, or Barak Obama.

I've forgotten what signature I'm using. Is it still the birds ARE one?

yesterday
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Surprise! More Than Twice As Much Mercury In Environment As Thought

RockDoctor Re:Passing comment (173 comments)

Dumping mercury-containing waste into an active volcano will only ensure that there is an increased mercury concentration in the fumes coming off the volcano in the next eruption, and in any hot water springs around the volcano (common).

I think that you mean dumping it into an active subduction zone. But you'd need to put it several kilometres down into the subduction zone (that's drilling technology ; we sell introductory courses to drilling - about $2000/week excluding your accommodation costs. Or our instructor's accommodation costs if you've got a class of 4 or more.) unless you're willing to underwrite the security of your storage equipment for around 10 million years (to get natural subduction to a similar depth).

yesterday
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Surprise! More Than Twice As Much Mercury In Environment As Thought

RockDoctor Re:Back when Moby Dick was a minnow ... (173 comments)

it's deceptively dangerous it is not like a poison

That's nonsensical.

It is a poison. It's a slow-acting, low dose poison. but it's a poison nonetheless. It's difficult to estimate people's long-term exposures, because even very small levels of mercury loss from the body will have large effects on the cumulated dose over the decades.

Your mental image of what a poison is, is not adequate to make safe predictions about what is and is not poisonous, and at what doseages.

Do you remember Paracelsus' best-known dictum? If you don't know it, you really should.

yesterday
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Surprise! More Than Twice As Much Mercury In Environment As Thought

RockDoctor Re:#1 Source of Environmental Mercury = Gold Minin (173 comments)

and the third is not just silver mining but also outright cinnabar mining. Luckily, I live on the side of the lake which is relatively clean

Hmm, good enough reasons to consider appropriate precautions. And considering that we don't know what the safe lower exposure limit for mercury is (assuming that it's significantly different to the homeopathic concentration), that's going to need some careful thought.

and I have an RO filter because there's a hell of a lot of stuff around here in the water

Sorry, what's an "RO filter"? Run-Off? (I wouldn't have thought that snow-melt and rainfall from a clean roof would have picked up much ; unless you're horribly dusty, when you've got other issues to attend to.)

yesterday
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Surprise! More Than Twice As Much Mercury In Environment As Thought

RockDoctor Re:Were the latex paint people jealous (173 comments)

Tetraethyl Lead was used [..], and is still used in some aviation fuel. There appears to be illegal manufacture and use of the substance ongoing in the PRC.

If there is still legal manufacture and use in aviation gas, as you imply, what makes you think that there is illegal manufacture in PRC? There may be illegal or unlicensed use of PbEt4, made for the aviation market, as automobile fuel additives, but that doesn't make the manufacture itself illegal. Always assuming, of course that you're applying the appropriate laws to PRC. Whatever jurisdiction you're resident in, it's laws don't apply in the PRC (unless you're in the PRC). I don't know if the PRC has banned the manufacture of PbEt4. I do know that a very high proportion of the automobiles in China were manufactured since the 1980s, which means that they've got no need to use PbEt4. And that in itself casts serious doubt on your assertion.

The amounts involved as a fuel antiknock ingredient exceed Lead's use in mold control and paint, and should be considered the primary source for increased Lead in the environment.

That was certainly the case when I was learning to drive. But I can't remember having seen any petrol pumps supplying PbEt4-doped fuel for ... over a decade, maybe approaching two decades now. I remember there being a mild wailing and gnashing of teeth from the old-car freaks when the last refinery in the country (on this continent, perhaps?) that produced PbEt4-doped fuel stopped producing it. But they've shut the fuck up because anti-knock additives are available for engines that can't be dressed-back to use lead-free fuel ; you just have to pour in an appropriate amount of additive into your tank along with the amount of fuel. Yourself. Also, the additives may be less toxic - lead is not the only metal ion that exhibits anti-knock properties, just the cheapest, when you're doing it by the hundred-tonne batch.

yesterday
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Microsoft Defies Court Order, Will Not Give Emails To US Government

RockDoctor Re: They still need to orchestrate a show and tell (419 comments)

I stopped using M$ stuff myself at all after the train wreck that was Vista. I don't know if that was before or after the Office 365 stuff arrived, since typical network capability for my work locations then was a 256kbps link shared between 30 people on-shift and 70 off-shift or asleep. I doubt that would have been adequate for live use of an Office-like thing.

These days I use whatever email thing the client provides, my in-house software, and PDF most documents that other people need. After that, it's my choice of tools.

5 days ago
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Survivors' Blood Holds Promise, But Draws Critics, As Ebola Treatment

RockDoctor Re:I have been wondering for some time, too (55 comments)

Truth is that nobody has any clue as to how to contain this ebola epidermic in West Africa

You contradict yourself. The solution is well-known. Quarantine.

It is just politically unacceptable, and there's a high probability of there not being enough troops to enact the quarantine by shooting people trying to escape. Which raises another problem ; having shot them, what do you do with the potentially infectious bodies?

And, who is going to order sovereign nations (four, so far, including a nation of around 100million people) to close their borders and shoot their own population?

But quarantine does have a long and good track record.

about a week ago
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Survivors' Blood Holds Promise, But Draws Critics, As Ebola Treatment

RockDoctor Re:Hire the recovered patients (55 comments)

They may have aches and pains ongoing, but it sounds like they could still function well

One of the early symptoms is that you slough off the lining of your intestines. The euphemistic "bloody diarrhoea" is the lining falling off your gut and falling out of your arse. Not to mention the blood pissing out of every orifice, including many of your sweat glands.

Good luck recovering from that in a couple of months. Yeah, straight back to work as a serum mule!

After the way that haemorrhagic virus tends to make all your blood vessels thin-walled and porous, just getting a line in for taking a blood sample is likely to be a challenge.

about a week ago
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California Blue Whales Rebound From Whaling

RockDoctor Re:DEFENDED due to grammatical fustercluck (91 comments)

Real geeks do not care about grammar.

Obviously, you've never had to write a compiler.

Real geeks do not care about non-geek's grammar.

Better?

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Micro$loth to sack 18,000 workers

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 2 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The Grauniad is reporting that Micro$loth are planning to sack 18,000 people in the near future. I'm sure that'll make them feel better. The sacked people, of course ; it'll be devastating to the managers who hand out the redundancy notices."
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International game tournaments segregated by sex/ gender.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 2 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The Grauniad is reporting that a finnish heat of an international gaming competition is being segregated into male and female branches in accordance to international rules.

The International e-Sports Federation (IeSF) want "eSports" to be recognised as equivalent to physical sports. And that, it seems, requires that competitors be segregated on grounds of sex. Which may be appropriate for pole vaulters, but not necessarily appropriate for ePole vaulters. This leaves the organisers of national heats of eSports in a rather invidious position of having (in this case) a tournament only open to "Finnish male players."

So, support gender equality, or support the recognition of electronic sports as having the same status as kicking balls around? Pick one."
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French Railways order the wrong size of train.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 4 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The BBC are reporting that SNCF, the French national railway system, has ordered several thousand new complete trains, but then discovered that they are

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-27497727

to fit into many railway stations.

For reasons that are not explained, the railway owning company (RFF) had to measure the sizes of it's platforms to find out what size they were (which begs the question of, why didn't they know the sizes of their stations already?), then tell the train operating company (SNCF) what size trains to buy. But RFF only measured the sizes of stations built in the last 30 years, and since discovered that stations built previously were noticeably different, and the new trains wouldn't fit into older stations.

At least they were both using metres, not cubits versus roods.

[The French] Transport Minister Frederic Cuvillier blamed an "absurd rail system" for the problems.
"When you separate the rail operator from the train company," he said, "this is what happens."

The last quote is ominous for the Britons who pay for the BBC, as our railway system is similarly divided up between track-owning companies (many) and train-operating companies (also many), thanks to the the Maggon and her cronies."
Link to Original Source

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Pentagon : scope of intelligence compromised by Snowden 'staggering'

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 4 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The Grauniad are reporting that a Freedom of Information Act request has revealed a report (or 12 pages of a 37-page report, the remainder censored) that

“the scope of the compromised knowledge related to US intelligence capabilities is staggering”

Well isn't that just terribly sad for them. My heart bleeds. Ed Snowden, if we ever meet, the first beer is my shout."
Link to Original Source

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A new class of plastics : recyclable thermosetting polymers.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 4 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "Plastics which form by chemical reactions in the presence of heat are very useful. They can be very strong, and if you incorporate appropriate "filler" materials (chalk, glass fibre, carbon fibre), they can have very attractive engineering properties. But .. that chemical reaction makes them very difficult to recycle, because the new chemical formed during the reaction will often char before it melts. We're not talking about thermo-plastic polymers here (e.g. nylon, polypropylene, PET), but thermo-setting ones including epoxies, phenol-formaldehyde resins, etc.

But no more : an international team have discovered a new class of polymer-forming reactions that produce a thermo-setting polymer, but they can recover the initial components by digesting the polymer with moderately strong acid (pH 2 ; I'd wear gloves. And glasses.), so after a component is used and obsolete, or broken, it can be separated reasonably easily into it's original components (including valuable reinforcing materials, such as carbon fibre) and these then re-used. That is a pretty big step forward."

Link to Original Source
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First diver dies in S.Korea ferry recovery efforts.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 4 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The BBC are reporting that the Korean ferry disaster has claimed it's latest victim, a civilian diver engaged in body-recovery efforts.

Five minutes after commencing a dive to about 25m, diver Lee lost communication with other divers. His body was later recovered to the surface.

This is unlikely to be the final death. Last week another diver lost consciousness underwater, which is an extraordinarily bad situation. He had dived four times previously that morning. Several others have been treated with at a hyperbaric oxygen recompression facility after decompression events.

The initial search of the vessel is nearly completed, but the entire ship is to be re-searched. 40 bodies are still missing."
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Data security on the Internet of things - digestible version

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 7 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "While it has been discussed on Slashdot before, the questions around data security on the "Internet of Things" may seem a little dry to many people.

The excellent webcomic 'Freefall' (by Mark Stanley) addresses some of these concerns in typical "Ha ha. But serious." manner. While the original Internet-controlled coffee machine might not seem so threatening, when it becomes a voice-controlled coffee pot, linked to your grocery account ... all of a sudden it doesn't seem so innocuous."
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Bitcoin plummets after Chinese block 3rd-party payment processors

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 9 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "In order to use Bitcoin in the real world, you need to convert it into a convertible currency (Kroner, or Rupees, or Yuan, or even USD), a task that is undertaken by "third-party payment provider[s]."

Earlier this month, China's central bank warned that Bitcoin was "not legally protected," had no "real meaning", and barred financial institutions from using the currency. That ban was extended to 3rd-party providers on Tuesday (though with a deadline of Jan 31st / Chinese New Year), and last night 3rd-party provider YeePay complied with the ban. In consequence the Chinese Bitcoin exchange BTC China announced that they could not accept deposits in yuan ; overnight, the exchange's value for Bitcoin has fallen to half it's earlier values.

All the theorising about the value of Bitcoin in opening up a new economy is moot if users can't either put money into the currency, or exchange the currency for one that they can use in the Real World."

Link to Original Source
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The Empire of Evil develop technology ... without (obvious) evil intent.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 10 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "In a move designed by a PR genius, a conspiracy team of crack Iranian hardware hackers are developing a ground-steered drone for marine Search and Rescue work. Development plans include fully automating the flying and search-and-track capabilities. This will no doubt be followed up by a beefed-up version capable of dropping a "dirty nuke" in Central Park New York.

In deference to the expressed stereotypes of Slashdot, it is also impossible that these persons of the "brown" and "Muslim" persuasions to have developed this technology on their own, and must have stolen it from someone in the rest of the world."
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Falling GOCE satellite seen from Falkland islands.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about 10 months ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The GOCE satellite was expected to fall out of the sky at the weekend, and orbital calculations before it last disappeared from the view of ground stations suggested that it came down in the South Atlantic.

The BBC post pictures from a Falkland Islands resident (Las Islas Malvinas if you're in Latin America) who saw a large, fragmenting fireball travelling in the right direction at the right time. Video is available. You'll need to travel to their home near Volunteer Point to view it. If you happen to have a satellite base station in your back pocket, they might be interested in borrowing it to be able to upload the video recordings. Don't bother to take a mobile phone.

Oh, nice tombolos along that waterfront."
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"Light Caber" to be replaced.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  1 year,4 days

RockDoctor (15477) writes "In news not coming to you from the Star Trek universe, the so-called "light caber" is to be replaced. How this will impact future aspirant Jedi Knights is unclear, as they will have to manufacture new designs. Members of the Jedi Knight community who are experienced tossers may be little affected."
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Google 'Glass' to be banned while driving

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes ""Stuff" magazine, a "gadget" oriented mag, is reporting that the UK's Department for Transport is planning to ban drivers from using Google "Glass", using the same law (1988 Road Traffic Act) that is used to ban drivers from using hand-held mobile phones.

While there are obvious parallels between the distraction potential of the mobile phone and of "Glass", there are arguments in the other direction that the speech-control aspects of "Glass" could make it less distracting than, say, a touch-screen SatNav. So, to ban "Glass" driving or not?

Typical fines for using a mobile phone while driving are £60 cash plus three penalty points on the driving license ; the points expire 3 years after the offence and if you accumulate 12 points then you've lost your license. Repeat offenders may experience higher fines and/ or more points. Around a million people have received the penalty since the mobile phone ban was introduced in 2003."

Link to Original Source
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Cyclist pleads guilty to manslaughter of pedestrian.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The Grauniad is reporting that a San Francisco cyclist has pleaded guilty to a charge of "vehicular manslaughter" over a collision which killed a 71-year-old pedestrian.

Seemingly, the cyclist had run three successive red lights before finding himself "unable to stop" and ploughing into multiple pedestrians at a junction. "Unable to stop" plainly translates to "driving too fast" in this case.

Running multiple red lights, as the cyclist seems to have accepted by the plea bargain, is a mark of reckless irresponsibility on behalf of the cyclist, as is his admittedly excessive speed. Cyclists have obligations towards pedestrian safety in the same way that motor vehicle drivers have too."

Link to Original Source
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Wood-powered USB re-charger

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "Out camping, and your smart phone has a flat battery, so you can't turn it on to discover that you haven't got a signal to call up a weather report to find out if it's raining or not? Well now you don't just have the option of opening your eyes and looking at the skies (hint :the big, round wet things are "raindrops" — Wikipedia may have a better description) ; now you can also feed some random bits of plants — twigs, cones — into a little camping stove, and while you're making a cup of $BEVERAGE$ the stove will produce enough electricity to recharge your power-hungry technology.

OK, I'm being a touch sarcastic about using it for a mobile phone. But as someone who likes week-long trips into the mountains, with camera batteries to re-charge, and GPS loggers to re-charge, and tablet computers which I use to record my geological notes also needing re-charge ... this is a technology that I may well be experimenting with. It's not without criticisms, valid ones, but it does have interesting potential. I'm sure the compounded wilderness experience of the techno-nerds of Slashdot can work out some criticisms of the idea.

In a sideline, it comments on the (in-)efficiency of thermoelectric electricity generation : for a stove peak power of 5.5kW, it can produce up to 4W of electrical power, for an efficiency of 0.072% (tech specs here). Hmmm, maybe photovoltaics on the lid of my rucksac would be better?"
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BBC gives up on 3-D programming.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "After spending several years on supporting the uptake of 3-D TV, the BBC has accepted that people don't want it, and are turning off their 3-D channels following an uptake of under 5% of households with 3-D equipment.

I can just feel the joy at not having wasted my money on this technology."

Link to Original Source
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Will Alibaba have a bigger IPO than Facebook?

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "The BBC are speculating that the impending IPO of Chinese mega-B2B company Alibaba may have an IPO value larger than that of Facebook. Since Alibaba primarily put the manufacturers of physical goods into contact with the customers of physical goods, does this remind you that the world does exist outside of the Interwebz?"
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Retail 3-d Printers becoming available in the UK

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "Well-known retail electronics/ gadgetry company Maplin are advertising the availability soon of retail build-it-yourself 3-d printer kits from German (I think) supplier Velleman. While this is quite expensive (£700), it's specs also include a fairly large build volume (20x20x20 cm).

While Maplin have never been cheap, they are one of the few places in the UK these days where you can get electronics parts on the "High Street" (more or less — dozens if not a hundred stores ; for electronics what Jessops used to be for cameras) without having a business credit card and a £1000/month minimum account spend.

So, if they're dipping a toe onto the 3-d printing bandwagon, then it's a good chance that widespread adoption is not far behind."
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XCom : Enemy Unknown (iOS) edition to be premium-priced

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "BBC News are reporting that 2K Games will be marketing the iOS (iPhone and/ or iPad? I'm not an Apple-core.) at the relatively high price of £13.99 (20€ / $US17.99) compared to a more typical game price of £5.99 (etc. etc.). They discuss how effective this "premium-price" model will be, compared to the alternative "pile'em high and sell 'em cheap" model or the "give away the game and charge for buying a BFG9000" model.

Seems to me about the same price that I paid for the original game in ~1994, and I still enjoy playing that. Guess that makes me an economic dead end to the company though."
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US College students raise money for sex-change

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "In a small and unusual outbreak of peculiarity, Yahoo is carrying news of an American college "fraternity" (approximately, a single-gender house owned by a student group, providing communal accommodation at universities that don't have student accommodation) which has raised thousands of dollars to pay for the gender re-assignment surgery of one of their first-year members.

According to the story, "Donnie Collins, 20, a sophomore at Emerson College in Boston, was born female but has been living as a male since he was 17..." and had joined a male fraternity (females go to a "sorority" ; it's Latin, live with it), but his health insurance (American for "citizen's medical service", approximately) wouldn't pay for the surgery to remove his breasts. So, the men in his accommodation grouped together to raise the money for the surgery.

Yahoo's editors (or Reuters, the source of the story) are obviously puzzled about the motivation of the fraternity men. But it seems obvious to me : the severed breasts are going to be mummified and nailed to the wall of the living room. Once the "girl" has gone."

Link to Original Source
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Road tunnel "cheesed off"

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RockDoctor (15477) writes "Life can be hard for roads and road tunnels : mountains press down on your shoulders, snow and ice dust your feet, and deisel and petrol fumes choke your lungs. But occasionally you can get really cheesed off. "the Brattli Tunnel at Tysfjord, northern Norway" has been closed and badly damaged by a fire on a lorry load of cheese. Which is moderately scarey and not terribly funny when you remember that a few years ago one of the trans-Alpine tunnels was closed by a similar lorry fire with several deaths and the tunnel closed for repairs for months.

On the other hand — the Mythbusters have tried building salami-powered rockets in the past, and may have a new material to evaluate."

Link to Original Source

Journals

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So, new toys. "Acheivements" and encouragement to contribute

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Well, pouring a little (more) petrol onto the fire of burning the religious seems to have garnered me another fan, one "thats1fuzzybug99" has increased my "Friend" count by almost 6%.
That would be wonderful. If I knew what it meant.
I wonder who some of the other 94-odd% are. Hopefully some are very odd!

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Politics and moderation.

RockDoctor RockDoctor writes  |  more than 9 years ago

Doing some moderation and getting extremely pissed off by the endless maundering of (presumed) Americans about some internal political matters. Someone called Kerry Dubyah is contesting with someone called John Bush for the leadership of some body called POTUS (sometimes a related position called FLATUS is also brought into the "debate" to confuse matters. this post seems to be related to the gigolos/ babotchkas that the contestants use/ are used by. I think.)
I'm wishing for a moderating flag like "Parochial Politics" that would come at a level like "-99", so that such comments could be killed off at source, leaving the interesting (to nerds - this is "News for Nerds, stuff that matters" after all) stuff like the trolling, the flamebaits and the actual technical stuff where people can find it without wading through the dross. Might be able to get rid of the Iraq dross through the same method.

But how to put this forward to the "system" as a proposal? Still can't find a place to post such suggestions/ requests.

The idea is not /quite/ comparable to moderation though - things can move up and down a scale in the moderating system, but I envisage this as being more like a permanent flag. Sort of like the "green beard" method described by W.D.Hamilton.

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