Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

DARPA Launches Military Spaceplane Project

RocketAcademy Re:Seriously? Spaceplanes are a dead-end technolog (75 comments)

" A plane that can take off horizontally, burning atmospheric air while accelerating and climbing, which then switches to using its own on-board oxygen in order to reach orbit makes a lot of sense."

Until you look at the physics/economics. Extracting oxygen from the atmosphere isn't free. It shows up as drag, which requires more fuel to overcome. The liquid oxygen in a rocket's propellant tank has already had kinetic energy added to it. The oxygen you get from the atmosphere is at a much lower energy state, so you have to add energy to it. This makes high-speed airbreathers very difficult.

The "massive amounts of oxygen" you are saving are actually quite cheap. Liquid oxygen is one of the cheapest fluids you can buy. Cheaper than bottled water. The idea that it's going to be cheaper to manufacture it in flight than on the ground is inherently flawed. What you save in LOX, you lose in additional fuel. Moreover, the fuel needed to make these schemes work is not hydrocarbon (cheap) but liquid hydrogen (expensive). The structures needed to contain LH2 are also expensive, due to the low propellant density. These factors make airbreathing a non-starter.

1 year,12 days
top

DARPA Launches Military Spaceplane Project

RocketAcademy Re:SpaceX (75 comments)

"I reckon the "real" purpose of the program is to develop a mach-10 air-breathing aircraft"

Certainly not. Hypersonic airbreathers are extremely difficult, and there's an enormous difference between cruise missions (airliners) and acceleration missions (space launch). Airbreathers tend to perform well at a specific velocity (cruise speed) while rockets must perform well over a wide range of speeds.

Jess Sponable knows that, have seen what happened in the X-30 NASP program, and will not go down that route.

1 year,12 days
top

Arduino Enables a Low-Cost Space Revolution

RocketAcademy Re:Real Science? (70 comments)

Well, some people think that global monitoring of crop patterns, rainfall, land usage, climactic shifts, etc. is useful science.

If you don't, that's okay.

about a year ago
top

Arduino Enables a Low-Cost Space Revolution

RocketAcademy Re: Space is rough (70 comments)

radiation hardening does NOT mean long lead times or ultra expensive components.

NASA are not idiots you're right, they also don't build microsatellites with off the shelf arduinos.

You need to do some research. NASA just successfully launched two PhoneSat satellites this year, which use Arduino as part of a watchdog circuit. They plan on flying more in the future.

Planet Labs was founded by two of the lead engineers who built PhoneSat. The founders of Nanosatisfi worked at NASA Ames, where PhoneSat was built, and EADS Astrium, a major satellite manufacturer.

Just because something appears in a parts catalog doesn't mean it's available for overnight shipping. You'll find that out if you actually try to order them.

The fact that someone is doing something differently than you would doesn't necessarily mean they are stupid or know less than you do. They may have good reasons for what they are doing, because they spent more time thinking about the problem than you did composing your Slashdot flame. Not to mention building actual hardware and testing it. If you believe you can do better, great -- build your own satellite.

about a year ago
top

Arduino Enables a Low-Cost Space Revolution

RocketAcademy Re: Space is rough (70 comments)

"Nowhere do I see mention of these arduinos being special, radiation-hardened versions. Nowhere, is there mention about extended temperature range, vibration, etc. These are all important if the mission is expected to succeed." Most small satellites do not use radiation-hardened components. Rad-hard chips provide 1/10 the power at 10 times the price, and thet aren't available when you need them. Generally, they're made to order with long lead times. It's generally easier to add a watchdog circuit to reboot the computer when it crashes due to a radiation event. Even the laptops aboard ISS are not rad-hard. In higher orbits and interplanetary space, radiation levels are higher and rad hardening becomes a bigger concern. Even there, techniques like spot shielding can reduce the number of components that need to be hardened. You might want to consider the possibility that maybe, perhaps, people who have built and operated satellites professionally for organizations such as NASA are not idiots and have some idea what they are doing.

about a year ago
top

FCC Guidance On Radio For Commercial Space Operations Falls Short

RocketAcademy Re:You know (48 comments)

If there were no commercial ramifications you could use amateur radio licenses. People already talk to the ISS, bounce signals off the moon, etc. All you need is the ticket.

Not legally.

about a year and a half ago
top

FCC Guidance On Radio For Commercial Space Operations Falls Short

RocketAcademy Re:Um, that's why it's experimental. (48 comments)

Instead of "guesstimating a timeframe ," they could simply ask.

It's not like rocket companies have unlisted phone numbers or won't take a phone call from the FCC.

about a year and a half ago
top

Dennis Tito's 2018 Mars Mission To Be Manned

RocketAcademy Re:How will they get a craft ready by 2018? (233 comments)

SpaceX has been working on Dragon a longer than Lockheed's been building Orion. I was first heard about it back in 2003.

about a year and a half ago
top

Nuclear Rocket Petition On White House Website

RocketAcademy Re:Good and Bad (205 comments)

A failure on launch could result in releasing radioactive fission products over large areas.

That's why it's unlikely until we start to mine uranium on the Moon. (Not so much the chances of an accident but the perception.) I had a discussion about that with engineers at JSC, and everyone in the room agreed with that statement. Fortunately, finding uranium on the Moon is not out of the question. We know it's there.

about a year and a half ago
top

Legislators: 'Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town'

RocketAcademy Re:Speaking as said bottom feeding lawyer...... (143 comments)

Any launch from New Mexico is going to fly over other states, if not other countries, on its way to orbit. So yes, the interstate commerce clause could certainly apply if a New Mexico-launched rocket explodes and rains debris over Texas and Louisiana.

No, they will not overfly other states, and they aren't going to orbit. And again, you're confusing second- and third-party liability. Please do some research.

about a year and a half ago
top

Legislators: 'Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town'

RocketAcademy Re:If rockets worked, this wouldn't be a problem (143 comments)

Boeing doesn't have legislation protecting them if one of their airliners crashes onto somebody's house.

So do rocket companies. You don't understand the difference between third-party liability and first/second-party.

There's a difference between sitting your house and having an airliner crash on it and going out to a spaceport and buying a ticket. One of those involves assumed risk. The other doesn't.

about a year and a half ago
top

Legislators: 'Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town'

RocketAcademy Re:If rockets worked, this wouldn't be a problem (143 comments)

If affordable insurance isn't available from the private sector, the technology isn't safe enough for use by private parties.

"Private parties" are not allowed to decide for themselves what is and isn't safe enough?

Riding stables are protected by equine liability laws. So, I guess horses would be banned in your version of the nanny state? Or limited to the United States Cavalry?

about a year and a half ago
top

Legislators: 'Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town'

RocketAcademy Re:It sounds like more (143 comments)

It's not just the passengers - it's also the guy who sues for $1 million claiming that the rocket exhaust caused his asthma to flare up,

No, it's not. This law does not affect third-party liability, which is already covered by FAA regulations and insurance requirements.

about a year and a half ago
top

Legislators: 'Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town'

RocketAcademy Re:Suspicous (143 comments)

It seems to be more about liability for accidents affecting passengers.

That's exactly the case, except that they're called "spaceflight participants," not "passengers." To regulators, these terms have very specific meanings.

about a year and a half ago
top

Legislators: 'Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town'

RocketAcademy Re:Speaking as said bottom feeding lawyer...... (143 comments)

.....we grant airplanes or automobile makers the same kind of liability. So why should this industry be granted the same? The examples used in the open letter, skiing, skydiving, and bungee jumping, are considered "extreme sports". They are activities with a certain degree of personal risk. Space travel should not be in the same category. .

Roughly 1% of all human beings who've gone into space have died in the attempt. That is more extreme than skiing, skydiving, or bungee jumping -- or even professional rodeo.

Both the FAA and the United States Congress have declared that spaceflight is an "intrinsically dangerous activity."

Also, this talk of regulation is moot anyway. It is only a matter of time before the Feds get involved and pre-empt all state regs.

They are already are involved. That's why the FAA Office of Commercial Space Transportation exists. However, it isn't clear that liability for a spaceflight that begins and ends in New Mexico falls under the Interstate Commerce Clause.

about a year and a half ago
top

Legislators: 'Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town'

RocketAcademy Re:liability protection (143 comments)

Virgin already has immunity. They want a law extending that immunity to their suppliers and manufacturers.

Except that Virgin recently acquired The Spaceship Company. So, they are now the manufacturer as well.

about a year and a half ago
top

Ask Slashdot: How Would You Build a Microsatellite?

RocketAcademy Re:One word - AMSAT (117 comments)

No, you can't. Just having technical discussions with a foreign citizen falls under ITAR control.

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: How Would You Build a Microsatellite?

RocketAcademy Re:Building is easy, launching is hard (117 comments)

Buyer beware. Interorbital has never launched a satellite. $8k gets you some not-very-expensive parts and a voucher for a launch to take place some time in the future. They say launches will start next year. They've been saying that for years but have seldom test-fired their engine.

about 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: How Would You Build a Microsatellite?

RocketAcademy Re:Building is easy, launching is hard (117 comments)

The cost is about $40k if you can find someone who has extra space and will sell it to you at that price. There are more CubeSats than there are launches.

Most CubeSats are launched through NASA's ELANA program. The launch is free if you win the ELANA lottery. Most people who enter lotteries don't win them.

All launches at the moment are rideshares with larger payloads. There have been attempts to develop dedicated launchers for small satellites but none have made it to the launching pad. NASA created the Nanosatellite Launch Challenge to encourage development of a nanosat launcher. It was canceled before the competition began.

At the moment, most CubeSats are built as educational projects to train engineering students. Launching them into space is kind of a bonus, if it happens.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is working on an airborne launch system for small payloads (ALASA). The Army is working on its own launcher called SWORDS. It is not certain if these efforts will be successful or if the launches will be available for civilian payloads, if they are successful.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

top

Navy Research Might Be Key to Space-Based Solar Power

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about 6 months ago

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "A researcher at the US Naval Research Laboratory has developed an electronic module that can be used to capture solar energy in space and transmit it to Earth via microwave beam.

NRL has been studying space-based solar-power systems for several years. It has identified a number of possible applications including supplying power to forward bases, synthfuel production, and powering bistatic radars, sensors, and UAVs.

The military, which often pays much higher prices for energy than civilian customers, especially in remote areas, is seen as a possible anchor tenant for space-based solar power."
top

Astronomy Group Throws Tantrum Over Crater Names

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about 7 months ago

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "The International Astronomical Union has thrown a tantrum over a plan to crowdsource names for craters on Mars.

The IAU gives official scientific names to craters, but it has only bothered with craters that have "scientific significance." The science-funding platform Uwingu has launched a campaign to come up with popular names for the remaining craters. For as little as $5, a member of the public can name one of the craters on Uwingu's map, with the proceeds going to fund space science and education.

This caused the IAU to issue a statement condemning such crowdsourcing efforts. The IAU pointed out that it did allow the public to vote on names for two of Pluto's moons, in the past. In that case, however, the IAU rejected the winning name (Vulcan)."
top

Dream Chaser Damaged in Landing Accident at Edwards AFB

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year ago

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "The test article for Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft suffered a landing accident on Saturday when the left main landing gear failed to deploy, causing the vehicle to flip over. NBC News quotes a Sierra Nevada engineer saying that the pilot would have walked away.

Sierra Nevada Corporation is developing the Dream Chaser to support the International Space Station as part of NASA's Commercial Crew and Cargo program. It is not yet known what effect the mishap will have on Dream Chaser development.

A number of rocket vehicles have suffered landing-gear mishaps in the recent past. Several years ago, concerns over spacecraft gear design led to a call for NASA to fund a technology prize for robust, light-weight landing gear concepts."
top

DARPA Launches Military Spaceplane Project

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  1 year,13 days

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has launched a new program to develop a reusable first-stage launch vehicle. Experimental Spaceplane 1 (XS-1) would be capable of flying 10 times in 10 days, with a small ground crew, reaching speeds of Mach 10, and deploying a small upper stage to place a 3,000-pound satellite into orbit.

The XS-1 program is complementary to the Air Force's Boeing X-37, which is a reusable upper stage. The X-37 is currently launched by an expendable Atlas rocket but could be launched by a vehicle derived from XS-1 in the future.

Military planners have dreamed of a two-stage, fully reusable Military Spaceplane (MSP) for several years, but funding has not materialized up to now."
top

Suborbital Spaceflight Picks Up Speed

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  1 year,24 days

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "The race to develop low-cost, suborbital spaceflight is heating up. On Thursday, Virgin Galactic's SpaceShip Two successfully completed its second powered test flight, reaching a speed of Mach 1.4 and an altitude of 69,000 feet. Meanwhile, XCOR Aerospace has begun posting daily reports on the progress of its Lynx spaceplane, which is expected to begin flight tests sometime around the end of this year. This means one of both companies are likely to begin commercial service by the end of next year.

XCOR still plans to move its headquarters to Midland, Texas later this year, but Midland may not be the only suborbital spaceport in the Lone Star state. On Wednesday,the Houston Airport System revealed renderings of its proposed spaceport at Ellington Airport, near Johnson Space Center just south of Houston. Citizens in Space (also based in Texas) has begun training five citizen astronauts to fly as payload operators on the XCOR Lynx and evaluating biomedical sensors for use on the flights. Details of those astronaut activities were also released this week."
top

Arduino Enables a Low-Cost Space Revolution

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year ago

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "Arduino, the popular open-source microcontroller board, is powering a revolution in low-cost space-mission design. San Francisco-based Planet Labs, a spinoff of NASA's PhoneSat project, has raised $13 million to launch a flock of 28 Arduino-based nanosatellites for remote sensing. Planet Labs launched two test satellites this spring; Flock-1 is scheduled to launch on an Orbital Sciences Antares rocket in 2014.

NanoSatisifi, also based in San Francisco-based company, is developing the Arduino-based ArduSat, which carries a variety of sensors. NanoSatisifi plans to rent time on ArduSats to citizen scientists and experimenters, who will be able upload their own programs to the satellites. The first ArduSat is scheduled for launch August 4 on a Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle carrying supplies to the International Space Station.

The cost of orbital launches remains a limiting factor, however. As a result, Infinity Aerospace has developed the Arduino-based ArduLab experiment platform, which is compatible with new low-cost suborbital spacecraft as well as higher-end systems such as the International Space Station.

The non-profit Citizens in Space has purchased 10 flights on the XCOR Lynx spacecraft, which will be made available to the citizen-science community. Citizens in Space is looking for 100 citizen-science experiments and 10 citizen astronauts to fly as payload operators. To help spread the word, it is holding a Space Hacker Workshop in Dallas, Texas on July 20-21. Infinity Aerospace will be on hand to teach Arduino hardware and software."
top

SpaceShip Two Flies Supersonic on First Powered Flight

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy (2708739) writes "Virgin Galactic's SpaceShip Two broke the sound barrier this morning on its first rocket-powered flight. The flight began at 7:02 am Pacific, according to the press release from Virgin Galactic. The reusable suborbital spacecraft reached an altitude of 47,000 feet and a speed of Mach 1.2 with test pilots Mark Stucky and Mike Alsbury at the controls.

Companies such as Virgin Galactic and XCOR Aerospace hope that suborbital spacecraft will make spaceflight routine and affordable for researchers and citizen space explorers. Customers are already lining up for the new vehicles. Hundreds of scientists are expected to attend the Next Generation Suborbital Researchers Conference in June. Hardware hackers who wish to become citizen scientists or citizen astronauts are preparing to attend the first Space Hacker Workshop for Suborbital Experiments this weekend (May 4-5)."
top

Sarah Brightman's ISS Trip in Peril

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy writes "Actress/singer Sarah Brightman's trip to the International Space Station may not happen in 2015 as scheduled.

Space Adventures works with the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) to fly private citizens like Brightman on Soyuz taxi flights. Those taxi missions normally last eight days, but NASA and Roscosmos are considering a plan to extend the 2015 taxi flight to one month, so it can carry a scientist to perform some additional research aboard ISS. If that happens, Brightman will lose her seat.

This situation points to the need for more flexible transportation options and new orbital facilities which are not subject to the same operational restrictions as ISS. SpaceX, Boeing, and Sierra Nevada are working on the transportation problem, while Bigelow Aerospace expects to begin launching its Space Station Alpha in 2015. So, the era of citizen astronauts visiting ISS may be drawing to a close."
top

FCC Guidance on Radio for Commercial Space Operations Falls Short

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy writes "The Federal Communications Commission has issued a Public Notice to help commercial space companies obtain use of communications frequencies for launch, operations, and reentry.

Commercial space companies can obtain the use of government frequencies on a temporary, non-interference basis through the FCC's Experimental Authorization process. Experimental Authorizations are valid for a six-month period from the date of grant and are renewable, but applicants must obtain a new authorization for each launch and must apply 90 days in advance.

Unfortunately, this requirement does not meet the needs of suborbital launch providers who expect to fly several times per day and schedule launches as needed, on very short notice."
top

Spaceport Development Picks Up Steam in Texas

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy writes "The Lone Star State is moving to become a leader in spaceport development.

The Houston Airport System is officially moving ahead with plans to turn Ellington Airport, near NASA’s Johnson Space Center, into an FAA-licensed commercial spaceport. The airport system has completed a feasibility study for turning the field into a spaceport for suborbital spacecraft such as Virgin Galactic's SpaceShip Two and XCOR's Lynx. In the longer term, spacecraft could link Houston to Singapore in as little as three hours, according to airport system director Mario Diaz.

Meanwhile, state Representative Rene Oliveira (D-Brownsville) introduced a bill that would allow county commissioners to close a local beach for launches from the proposed SpaceX launch site in Cameron County. The bill is part of a flood of spaceport-related legislation that has been introduced recently in the Texas legislature."
top

Dennis Tito Proposes "A Mission for America": Two Humans to Mars

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy writes "Dennis Tito, the first citizen space explorer to visit the International Space Station, has created the Inspiration Mars Foundation to raise funds for an even more dramatic mission: a human flyby of the planet Mars.

Tito, a former JPL rocket scientist who later founded the investment firm Wilshire Associates, proposes to send two Americans — a man and a woman — on a 501-day roundtrip mission which would launch on January 5, 2018. Technical details of the mission can be found in a feasability analysis which Tito is scheduled to present at the IEEE Aerospace Conference in March.

Former NASA flight surgeon Dr. Jonathon Clark, who is developing innovative ways of dealing with radiation exposure during the mission, called the flight “an Apollo 8 moment for the next generation.""
top

AXE and Buzz Aldrin Announce Apollo Space Sweepstakes

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy writes "Apollo 11 lunar-module pilot Buzz Aldrin joined AXE, a personal-grooming brand of Unilever, to announce the AXE Apollo Sweepstakes, which will select 22 winners to become astronauts on the XCOR Lynx Mk II spacecraft.

“Space travel for everyone is the next frontier in the human experience,” Aldrin said. “I’m thrilled that AXE is giving the young people of today such an extraordinary opportunity to experience some of what I’ve encountered in space.”

According to XCOR Aerospace, AXE will select one winner following the Super Bowl on February 3. Twenty-one additional winners will be selected later on. 100 early-stage winners will attend the AXE Apollo Space Academy in Orlando, Florida in December 2013.

Private citizens can also earn a chance to fly on the Lynx through Citizens in Space, a non-profit project of the United States Rocket Academy, which has purchased 10 flights for citizen astronauts."
top

Nuclear Rocket Petition on White House Website

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy writes "A petition on the White House website is calling for the United States to rapidly develop a nuclear thermal rocket engine.

Technically, nuclear rockets are a promising technology, but unless NASA develops a deep-space exploration ship such as Johnson Space Center's Nautilus X, a nuclear rocket would be wasted.

Launching nuclear rockets may pose regulatory and political problems as well. Practical applications may depend on mining uranium or thorium on the Moon."
top

"Spaceport America Could Become a Ghost Town"

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about a year and a half ago

RocketAcademy writes "A group of New Mexico legislators is warning that the $200-million Spaceport America "could become a ghost town, with tumbleweeds crossing the runways” if trial lawyers succeed in blocking critical liability legislation. The warning came in a letter to the Albuquerque Journal [subscription or free trial required].

Virgin Galactic has signed a lease to become the spaceport's anchor tenant but may pull out if New Mexico is unable to provide liability protection for manufacturers and part suppliers, similar to legislation already passed by Texas, Colorado, Florida, and Virginia. The proposed legislation is also similar to liability protection which New Mexico offers to the ski industry.

An eclectic group of business and civic interests has formed the Save Our Spaceport Coalition to support passage of the liability reform legislation, which is being fought by the New Mexico Trial Lawyers Association."
top

Government May Ease Export Controls on Space Technology

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about 2 years ago

RocketAcademy writes "After many years of complaints by the space industry, the United States government is finally moving close to reform on space export-control regulations. ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) was originally intended to control international arms shipments. Unfortunately, ITAR has been applied to space vehicles, satellites, and related technologies that are dual-use or purely civilian in nature.

The Wall Street Journal and other media outlets are reporting that the 2013 National Defense Authorization Act, just passed by the House and awaiting action in the Senate, would reverse some of the harshest changes to ITAR regulations that have been made in recent years.

The news of potential ITAR reform has been greeted enthusiastically by industry groups including the Commercial Space Federation, the Aerospace Industries Association, and the Space Foundation. Notably absent was any statement from the “bad boys of space” at the Space Frontier Foundation, who are busy planning a Welcome Back party for ex-convict Walt Anderson,"
top

NASA Cancels Nanosat Challenge

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about 2 years ago

RocketAcademy writes "NASA has canceled funding for the Nano-Satellite Launch Challenge, a $2-million prize competition that was intended to promote development of a low-cost dedicated launch system for CubeSats and other small satellites.

The cancelation is a setback for small satellite developers, many of whom have satellites sitting on the shelf waiting for a launch, and the emerging commercial launch industry.

The Nano-Satellite Launch Challenge was being run by NASA and Space Florida as part of NASA's troubled Centennial Challenges program. The sudden cancelation of the Launch Challenge, before the competition even began, is calling NASA's commitment to Centennial Challenges into doubt."
top

Low-Cost CubeSats are Gaining Respect, Mindshare

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about 2 years ago

RocketAcademy writes "Low-cost nanosatellites known as CubeSats were originally developed as educational projects for university students. Today, CubeSats are attracting increasing attention for their ability to tackle a wide variety of applications. NASA's innovative PhoneSat, which uses a Nexus cellphone as its primary processor, has won the Best of What's New Award from Popular Science.

Most CubeSats operate in Earth orbit, but interplanetary CubeSat missions are also gaining mindshare. A team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory proposed sending a
CubeSat mission to Phobos, on of Mars' moons, earlier this year. Now, a group of companies is proposing a non-profit private mission that could carry up to 27 CubeSats to Mars."
top

The Great Meteor Grab

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about 2 years ago

RocketAcademy writes "New regulations by the Federal government define asteroidal material to be an antiquity, like arrowheads and pottery, rather than a mineral — and, therefore, not subject to US mining law or eligible for mining claims.

At the moment, these regulations only apply to asteroidal materials that have fallen to Earth as meteorites. However, they create a precedent that could adversely affect the plans of companies such as Planetary Resources, which intends to mine asteroids in space."
top

Virgin Galactic's Quiet News

RocketAcademy RocketAcademy writes  |  about 2 years ago

RocketAcademy writes "While all eyes were focused on SpaceX, which is preparing for another launch to the International Space Station, Virgin Galactic quietly put out a press release.

Virgin Galactic has acquired full ownership of The SpaceShip Company, which will build production versions of SpaceShip Two. Ownership was previously shared with Scaled Composites, which built SpaceShip One and is building the SpaceShip Two prototype.

There have been rumors of strained relations between Virgin Galactic and Scaled Composites. This news, which was not announced until after the close of business Friday, raises some interesting questions about Virgin's relationship with Scaled and its plans for the future."

Journals

RocketAcademy has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?