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Legal War For WA State Sunshine Law

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:The Law of Unintended Consequences (1364 comments)

I have to disagree here, and shake my head sadly at the number of up-modded clueless Slashbots talking on this.

It is people who wish to restrict gay rights behind this. It is a first in terms of arguing for anonymity in such a way on a petition-backed ballot option.

Gays who have campaigned elsewhere, and run petitions for ballot items, have put up with their names being publicly available.

If you're a raging homophobe in private, fine. If you want to sign a petition calling for a ballot on restricting the rights of people you don't like — have the balls to accept the potential consequences.

more than 5 years ago
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Legal War For WA State Sunshine Law

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Turn the tables (1364 comments)

Do you want to discuss the topic, or attack the person?

As seen on Usenet...
Ideas are beautiful and fragile things; attack people, not ideas.

more than 5 years ago
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Demo of EU's Planned "INDECT" Hints At Massive Data Mining, Little Privacy

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Who the hell are they trying to catch? (122 comments)

Two possibilities:

Osama isn't in Pakistan (or Afghanistan) at all - he's disappeared, or died, or retired to Florida to drink pina-coladas all day, or - The security forces don't actually WANT to find him, as once they do there's no reason for them to continue in the region: Job done, game over, go home. And then what will they do to keep the contracts flowing to their friends in low places?

Osama Bin Laden is, truly, the modern-day Emmanuel Goldstein.

more than 5 years ago
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Real-LIfe Distributed-Snooping Web Game To Launch In Britain

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:So we can't afford Patrolling Police Officers.. (419 comments)

This is "Stasi 2.0".

Please, please. Keep detailed records of the interfering scumbags who sign up to work on this.

The chance of a revolution is small, but in that case I want to shoot these motherfuckers.

more than 5 years ago
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What Belongs In a High School Sci-Fi/Fantasy Lit Class?

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Movies (1021 comments)

Yes, movies.

That's a really good way to introduce a particular piece of literature. When doing Shakespeare at school, we watched Roman Polanski's Macbeth.

Fahrenheit 451, 2001 - A Space Odyssey, Watchmen (bonus: original is a graphic novel), Minority Report (based on a PKD short story), and lots more. Just don't take BladeRunner. Visually stunning for it's time, so much of the book is left out. PKD stuffed so many ideas into his work that it's generally his short stories that make better movies.

more than 5 years ago
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What Belongs In a High School Sci-Fi/Fantasy Lit Class?

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Some More Names to Consider (1021 comments)

I'd definitely go with this list. Two names that I'd pick out are:

  • Philip K. Dick - Particularly his Hugo winner - The man in the High Castle, or Radio Free Albemuth.
    The first is an alternative reality where the Nazis won. The second is fictional, as if someone worse than Nixon was elected - Nixon heavily influencing Dick's politics.
  • Douglas Adams - The Guide, humour, and a particularly cynical way of looking at the world. I'd actually say, go for the radio scripts there - possibly the TV series. The latter for the talking entries from the electronic book decades before Wikipedia.

more than 5 years ago
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Did Chicago Lose Olympic Bid Due To US Passport Control?

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:I don't blame them (1040 comments)

The amount of man-handling and smug stares I have to endure from thick-necked, multi-chinned police academy rejects is bad enough when flying domestically. That's no way to welcome the largest tourist event in the world.

Yes, but they never thought of this. They just wanted to welcome the largest tourists in the world.

I think most of them are already in America, and looking for their next cheeseburger.

more than 5 years ago
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The Pirate Bay Sails To a New Home

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Google Purges Pirate Bay? (244 comments)

I went from recommending AltaVista, to recommending Google when it was obvious the search algorithm was so much better. Nowadays, I don't recommend Google anymore, I recommend Firefox and a part of why I do that is because it has Google as the default search engine.

I'm probably preaching to the converted to say, that Google couldn't continue to exist without making money off that technology. And that technology enables the automation of something very valuable in advertising, contextual relevance.

more than 5 years ago
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The Pirate Bay Sails To a New Home

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Google Purges Pirate Bay? (244 comments)

Google is an advertising company. Not anything else. Not the technology tinkerer it works to portray itself as.

Wrong. Google is both of these things. They noticed that geeks respond better to advertising when it is true and assembled their company accordingly. A lot of good stuff is coming out of Google and a lot of Google geeks contribute to Open Source. Sure, they're not in the same league as IBM, Novell, Red Hat, or Intel, but they don't have to be.

The "technology tinkerer" part is Google's equivalent of a regular advertiser's department of coke-snorting-idea-generators.

They don't stand to make much money from geeks, we're the sort of people who learn how to filter out what they make money from. Text-only Adwords was a stroke of genius, when you look at what other advertisers were like at the time. Adverts that are relevant, and not so annoying that geeks will make tools to block them. Especially when the geeks might make that tool easy enough to use that the public do so.

And yes, you're right they've done a lot of interesting and good tech. Plus released quite a bit of it under liberal licenses. It makes for great PR, allows their techie people who develop these things the satisfaction that it's out there - even if the advertising company can't see a way to use it to sell ad space.

more than 5 years ago
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California Requests Stimulus Funding For Bullet Train

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Oh, for crying out loud. (567 comments)

There comes a point when 'let's add another lane' is no longer a viable option!"

There also comes a point when "let's have another horrendously expensive tax-sucking boondoggle" is no longer a viable option.

-jcr

I looked at the pricetag and my mind boggled.

Yet, by your logic - if applied a long, long time ago, there would be no rail or roads whatsoever - unless they were profitable.

It seems really unfair to damn this proposal, when it seems to be so similar to what works very well in Europe over similar distances, and with - I would expect - similar projected passenger numbers.

At the stated journey time, you are definitely going to get to your destination faster than even flying - unless you have a private jet standing constantly ready to go. You will miss the drawn-out paranoia-induced security procedures that make the time from arriving at the airport to getting on the plane hours. Not to mention, the environmental cost - you do know planes use a hell of a lot of expensive fuel?

more than 5 years ago
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The Pirate Bay Sails To a New Home

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:host the servers in antigua (244 comments)

Copyright isn't even the ownership of an idea anyway, its the ownership of the right to distribute that idea.

Try again.

Copyright is a social contract between the creator, and the general public, that they are granted a limited monopoly on their creation. The arguments for that, pretty much boil down to it being in the public's interest for people to have a chance to profit from their creations and thus create, and be able to create again in the future.

Saying, "Gee, just get paid what it's worth and don't bother if a megacorp rips you off to sell millions of copies" is breathtaking stupidity. You can't charge five million pounds each to an audience of 20-30 people just in case one of them works for the aforementioned megacorp and will copy your work.

more than 5 years ago
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The Pirate Bay Sails To a New Home

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Google Purges Pirate Bay? (244 comments)

I noticed this too, so I instinctively took a screenshot of my RSS reader to prove it did actually exist.

Anyone from Slashdot care to explain what the hell happened?

-- The content of this post has been removed for failing to comply with Newsspeak --

more than 5 years ago
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The Pirate Bay Sails To a New Home

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:Google Purges Pirate Bay? (244 comments)

Google is an advertising company. Not anything else. Not the technology tinkerer it works to portray itself as.

I'm sure I don't need to explain further.

more than 5 years ago
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Legal Code In a Version Control System?

Ronald Dumsfeld What the hell is he on *any* committee for? (334 comments)

So if he won't read the legislation, and says he can't understand it, why the fuck is he on any committee that is tasked with looking at specific pieces of legislation?

It would be sad, if it was not such an obscene state of affairs. Yet, it is a general indication of the state of politics and how it is trending. The election of George W. Bush, based on the persona he projects, was a clear indication that there are more and more people who are proud to be stupid. I'm not sure if the US leads the way in chasing ignorance, or just has a higher profile in doing so. I do know that, while entertaining to watch, this glorification of fucktardery made me shake my head when Forrest Gump was released. At least there, the stupid guy is good.

As to applying software development and maintenance techniques to legislation? Interesting idea. And the guy is talking bollocks when he says it is pointless to make legislation generally available for review.

Slashdot proves that concerned members of the public can read this stuff. We've got New York County Lawyer. So, yes, the set of people who can comment may be very restricted outside the legal profession. Yet, people like NYCL can give an interpretation of the legislation, sort of reverse-engineering it to whatever talking points the politicians fed to their highly-paid legalese generators. They can then point at the specific bits of the legislation, and you can judge for yourself if they match the analysis. Well, if you've not been indoctrinated to vegetate in front of Glenn Beck et al.

As long as you know where these volunteer legal analysts actually stand on issues, this would very valuable. They help tease out parts of the proposed laws that have obviously been fed into the process by lobbying groups who do not have the public's general welfare at heart.

Apart from the obvious implication that an elected official thinks, "the public who elected me are too stupid for me to make any effort to keep them informed of what I'm doing. It is a near-criminal offense to refuse to give people a chance to have their say on vital laws. In this case, the majority do want a public option, and in an ideal well-informed democracy those who do not would accept that.

As with all things political, and in a huge number of other areas, you should always follow Deep Throat's advice to Bob Woodward. Follow the money.

more than 5 years ago
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Auto-Detecting Malware? It's Possible

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:If OSX, Linux, & BSD can do it, Microsoft c (178 comments)

IF the programmers of Apple OSX, Linux, and BSD can make mostly malware-free software, Microsoft can also. Those operating systems have fewer vulnerabilities because they were designed to be secure.

Microsoft have made secure software in the past. I recall them touting one of the earlier stable NT releases passing some DoD standard or other for security.

What the morons from marketing did not tell you, was that the DoD had some qualifications attached to an NT system meeting their standard - the key one being: Not connected to the Internet.

I still wonder if the No Such Agency still has thousands of VMS systems. I've not used VMS (or, as it became, OpenVMS) in the last five years. I know many Unix fans really hated it, but the entire development of the OS was done using good, tested Software Engineering principles. It was fun when everyone was screaming about the world ending because of the Y2K problem. Alas, I can't find the great response one of the engineers - basically saying that Y2K was not an issue due to the internal date format, and Y10K would only be a problem for displaying the dates.

more than 5 years ago
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Microsoft Security Essentials Released; Rivals Mock It

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:It's working great for me (465 comments)

My Avira issues were around Vista's SP1 release, and yes, I did download the latest version.

more than 5 years ago
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Microsoft Security Essentials Released; Rivals Mock It

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:It's working great for me (465 comments)

Yup, I just told the Security Centre to ignore the Avira issue, and as another poster points out this no longer seems to be a problem.

Just don't ask your average user to disable a Security Centre warning, giving people the idea they could - or even should do such a thing is A Bad Idea.

more than 5 years ago
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Microsoft Security Essentials Released; Rivals Mock It

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:It's working great for me (465 comments)

They likely would have never understood why you need to pay a lot for top end protection, nor would they likely have payed for it.

Hell, I never understood that either. Why should anyone who just forked out $xxx for a brand-new OS then be forced to pay yearly "protection money" as well? Sounds like a racket to me.

I regularly end up helping people who've bought a new PC which comes infested with the Norton malware. If you don't rip it out before the free trial ends it is virtually impossible to get rid of it. And, of course, if you wait until the trial expires, you've probably caught some nasty - their package is, to put it bluntly, a bloated and useless piece of shit.

It sounds like Microsoft's offering is considerably less obtrusive, and end users will not be hit with the problems I've seen with my preferred solution, Avira.

I've used, and recommended Avira for years, it is completely free for non-commercial use and all you have to put up with is a once-a-day popup advert for their paid products. This is a good thing for non-technical users, it gives them a reminder that their anti-virus has just updated and is still working.

What really, really pissed me off was Vista. XP's security control centre quite happily recognised Avira, but Vista "conveniently" failed to recognise it. This means that unless you're reasonably technically savvy you will get constant nagging that you have no antivirus product. I wonder if that had anything to do with their plans to release this new product.

more than 5 years ago
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Mainstream Press "Cringes" At Win7 Launch Parties

Ronald Dumsfeld Re:It looks like even they know it sucks... (830 comments)

T=5:43: Can you believe that Microsoft put the launch of Windows 7 in our hands? Couldn't have said it better myself. I love the token nerd, attractive woman, old-but-hip person, and black guy. It's like they hired marketing undergraduates to design the video.

You foolish and naive individual. You don't hire marketing undergraduates. They'll suck cock for the networking opportunities.

Now, does Herr Ballmer have lipstick somewhere incriminating, or a rash from a five-o-clock shadow?

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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EU might be listening to you at last

Ronald Dumsfeld Ronald Dumsfeld writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ronald Dumsfeld (723277) writes "Wikinews puts together some of the details around the EU's five-year-plan called Project INDECT, and brings attention to a leaked "sales-pitch" video.

"An unreleased promotional video for INDECT located on YouTube is shown to the right. The simplified example of the system in operation shows a file of documents with a visible INDECT-titled cover stolen from an office and exchanged in a car park. How the police are alerted to the document theft is unclear in the video; as a "threat", it would be the INDECT system's job to predict it.
Throughout the video use of CCTV equipment, facial recognition, number plate reading, and aerial surveillance give friend-or-foe information with an overlaid map to authorities. The police proactively use this information to coordinate locating, pursing, and capturing the document recipient. The file of documents is retrieved, and the recipient roughly detained."

"

Link to Original Source
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Dear Lily- A letter to artists against filesharing

Ronald Dumsfeld Ronald Dumsfeld writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Ronald Dumsfeld (723277) writes "Dan Bull makes the perfect musical argument aimed at famous artists who stand up on the label's side, and end up taking down their anti-filesharing blog for doing what she's saying is so wrong.

Dear Lily Allan,
Remember when you pretended, Lily, that you were truly independent, Lily? Faking like you made it all alone but you were legally with Regal, part of Parlophone — oh yes.

"

Link to Original Source
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Wikipedia for Schools

Ronald Dumsfeld Ronald Dumsfeld writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Ronald Dumsfeld writes "The perfect answer for the student whose school has banned Wikipedia is the Wikipedia Selection for Schools vetted version. The latest version went online this Monday and Wikinews interviewed some of those involved.

This is the work of the SOS Children's UK charity and aimed at the developing world, but if you check Alexa you'll see it beats Citizendium so it has escaped darkest Africa!

No, you can't edit in how you're going to kill your maths teacher."

Link to Original Source
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What the media DIDN'T say

Ronald Dumsfeld Ronald Dumsfeld writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Ronald Dumsfeld writes "Its old news that Diebold have been polishing their entry on Wikipedia, or that the CIA had a go at the President of Iran. What the media have been reticent about is who they've taken an interest in. Wikinews investigated what the media had been up to on Wikipedia. Funny thing, the one news service that didn't cover the story... They don't seem that fair and balanced in their editing."
Link to Original Source
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Ronald Dumsfeld Ronald Dumsfeld writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Ronald Dumsfeld (723277) writes "Those wacky government think-tanks have come up with another first for Britain! Rights for robots. As the BBC report says, "The paper which addresses Robo-rights, titled Utopian dream or rise of the machines? examines the developments in artificial intelligence and how this may impact on law and politics."

Isn't this just another rehash of the "real AI is 20-50 years away" meme we've had since gawd knows when?"

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