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Small World Discovered Far Beyond Pluto

RoverDaddy Re:Pluto (63 comments)

My personal definition would be "if you can stand on it, it's a world". If you the best you can do is float next to it and even the slightest touch bounces you away, it's not a world. Hardly scientific, but it gets the point across.

about three weeks ago
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NVIDIA Unveils Next Gen Pascal GPU With Stacked 3D DRAM and GeForce GTX Titan Z

RoverDaddy Re:Stacked RAM isn't anything new. (110 comments)

Edit: Thinking about it, an inverter on CS (Chip Select) might be more likely.

about three weeks ago
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NVIDIA Unveils Next Gen Pascal GPU With Stacked 3D DRAM and GeForce GTX Titan Z

RoverDaddy Re:Stacked RAM isn't anything new. (110 comments)

I have a memory card from an original IBM PC from 1982, which has stacked memory chips. In fact, each pair of chips has ALL of their pins wired to the same contacts on the PCB. Although I have been unwilling to take apart the board to verify, this leads me to believe that the chip on top and the chip underneath are different. I'm guessing one of them has an inverter on an address line, so it will respond to even addresses, while the other responds to odd addresses.

about three weeks ago
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Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon

RoverDaddy Re: I think I've seen this plan (330 comments)

Really? The moon orbits the earth. Is it eclipsed by the earth 50% of the time? Of course not. You're only thinking about satellites in -low- earth orbit, which are shaded by the earth basically during half of each orbit. Put the satellites in very high orbits (geosynchronous itself is pretty high), and they are exposed to sunlight far more than 50% of the time. Heck, put a satellite in a polar orbit and for much of the year it can be exposed to the sun -throughout- its orbit.

about 2 months ago
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Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon

RoverDaddy Re: I think I've seen this plan (330 comments)

That still means at any given time 1/2 the panels aren't doing anything useful. It also means on every lunar day the panels go through massive temperature transitions from incredibly hot to incredibly cold.

Instead, you could place a ring of panels in high orbit around the earth and have -all- of them working nearly all the time. I guess there might be a tradeoff due to the need for microwave transmitters on every generating satellite (since wiring together sets of panels many kilometers apart in earth orbit is probably not feasible).

about 2 months ago
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The Neuroscience of Computer Programming

RoverDaddy Of course language centers were active... (161 comments)

while studying someone else's code. All the programmers were muttering and cursing under their breath, about what an idiot the programmer was and how much better they could have written the same thing.

about 2 months ago
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Time Warner Deal Is How Comcast Will Fight Cord Cutters

RoverDaddy Re:"Cord cutting" (424 comments)

Some of us care about that $10 a month. In fact, I didn't get basic cable bundled with my internet until it actually -dropped- the cost of my internet (net cost of basic cable was actually -negative-).

But what happened next? Comcast decided to switch basic cable from analog to digital to save bandwidth. (Ok, no problem so far - that's actually a good idea). But what did they give basic cable subscribers then? A tiny box which converted the digital signal to 4x3 Standard Definition NTSC television (the old Channel 3 connection). In other words, crap. I could hook up an antenna to my TV and pull broadcast TV in 1080p HD, but the cable company puts me back in the 90's. You bet your ass I cared about that $10 a month. If adding basic cable to my internet connection cost me even one cent I wouldn't have been happy.

about 2 months ago
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$499 3-D Printer Drew Plenty of Attention at CES (Video)

RoverDaddy Re:Yeah yeah (155 comments)

I don't think I've burned out a CFL in the past 8 years, and they weren't that expensive to begin with. So, anecdotally, YES they can be cheaper.

about 3 months ago
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23-Year-Old X11 Server Security Vulnerability Discovered

RoverDaddy Re:Many eyes... (213 comments)

Sorry, posting to remove erroneous moderation. Me and my clumsy fingers. Consider yourself getting +1 Funny.

about 3 months ago
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Computers and Doctor Who

RoverDaddy Re:MacGuffins, all of 'em (maybe a spoiler here) (93 comments)

That was really the weakest point of that story and really completely unnecessary. Considering that Doctor Who established that a Weeping Angel is a -stone statue- that can't move at all if anybody is looking at it, it makes no sense at all. First, the Statue of Liberty is not stone, and second, is there actually any point in time where -nobody- at all is looking at it?

about 6 months ago
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NC School District Recalls Its Amplify Tablets After 10% Break In Under a Month

RoverDaddy Re:Obvious Solution (177 comments)

That's quite a generality. I've been to my daughter's high school and the teachers there don't appear to be lazy in the least, AND they seem to be leveraging technology in sensible ways. For example, the way my daughter can log in to a school web site and see every day's lessons and homework assignments.

about 6 months ago
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The Human Brain Project Kicks Off

RoverDaddy I think I know where this is going.. (251 comments)

"We have only bits and pieces of information but what we know for certain is that at some point in the early twenty-first century all of mankind was united in celebration. We marveled at our own magnificence as we gave birth to AI.”

about 6 months ago
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A C++ Library That Brings Legacy Fortran Codes To Supercomputers

RoverDaddy Very limited scope (157 comments)

I took a look at TFA and followed up by reading the description of LibGeoDecomp:

If your application iteratively updates elements or cells depending only on cells within a fixed neighborhood radius, then LibGeoDecomp may be just the tool you've been looking for to cut down execution times from hours and days to minutes.

Gee, that seems like an extremely limited problem space, and doesn't measure up at all to the title of this Slashdot submission. It might really be a useful tool, but when I clicked to this article I expected to read about something much more general purpose, in terms of 'bringing Legacy Fortran to Supercomputers'.

By the way, regarding the use of the word 'codes': I don't think English is the first language of this developer. Cut some slack.

about 7 months ago
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Chris Kraft Talks About The Decline of NASA

RoverDaddy Re:But but but...... (262 comments)

Lacks nuance.

The ONLY exception to this, is where the private sector is completely incapable of doing something economically, like super-heavy lift and expensive deep-space vehicles. ... The choice is very simple -- if the private sector can't "cut it" (as is the case with the missions the SLS is meant for), NASA needs the cash to do the work itself.

Well I guess Elon Musk hasn't gotten the memo yet, that there's no way he can do heavy lift, because he certainly seems hell-bent on trying. Now do I know whether or not designs like the Falcon 9 Heavy or Falcon X Heavy can ever get off the drawing board? No I don't. But I'd love to see Musk try, instead of bowing to 'prevailing wisdom' that only the government can do this.

about 7 months ago
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Wireless Devices Go Battery-Free With New Communication Technique

RoverDaddy We don't know who struck first, us or them... (111 comments)

... But we do know it was us that scorched the sky. At the time, they were dependent on solar power. It was believed they would be unable to survive without an energy source as abundant as the sun.

So much for that bright idea.

about 8 months ago
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Former WaPo Staffer Rob Pegoraro Talks About Newspapers' Decline (Video)

RoverDaddy Re:The reasons have disappeard. (79 comments)

But not local news..

Well patch.com is trying. I can't say they're yet but at least you get some local news out of their sites.

about 9 months ago
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Former WaPo Staffer Rob Pegoraro Talks About Newspapers' Decline (Video)

RoverDaddy Re:The reasons have disappeard. (79 comments)

In my area I think retailers realize there are too many consumers who don't get a newspaper, so a bundle of advertising is bulk-mailed every Thursday for free. It provides flyers for most of the area supermarkets, a few hardware and department store flyers, and occasionally some coupons. And a lot of it is still printed on newsprint. We also get the advertising envelope bundles like Valpak and the like.

By the way, I don't think newspapers are even a particularly cheap source of paper, considering how thin many local newspapers have become. You can get a better deal buying a ream of paper at an office supply store, but I admit it won't burn as well or protect your packages like crumpled newsprint.

about 9 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Node.js vs. JEE/C/C++/.NET In the Enterprise?

RoverDaddy Re:LinkedIn uses Node (304 comments)

A package may not be compatible with the latest release, but there is no way to tell without installing it to try it out.

This is the first thing I ran into as a newcomer to Node. Not just packages but programming techniques. You're trying to learn how to do something trivial for the first time, so you hit Google and then drop into Stack Overflow and find plenty of questions and answers about your very problem. Then you try to use the solution and it falls apart. That's when you look back through the comments and you discover, "Oh yeah, I wrote that answer / released that package for Node 0.4.x: it really doesn't work anymore, sorry."

This isn't really an indictment of node, because I see this now wherever I look into the Web world (coming from the C/C++ world). So much immaturity (in the literal sense). Everything: HTML, CSS, Standards, Real-world browser support for said standards, VMs, best practices for JavaScript, tools like Dojo, Node, etc. all in flux. Documents that describe the "deprecated" old way, the new "approved" way, and the "better" way that doesn't work yet but will when the next revision is coming out (date TBD). A little more stability would go a long way.

about 9 months ago
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Supreme Court Overturns Defense of Marriage Act

RoverDaddy Re:What now? (1073 comments)

Actually the court decision still allows one state to refuse to recognize the same-sex marriages performed in another state. The decision only ruled against the portion of the law allowing the Federal Government to not grant rights and benefits to same-sex partners legally married in their home state.

So, basically the overall effect of the decision is: Legality of same-sex marriage is still each state's right to decide, but the Federal Government must abide by the rules of each state which ever way it goes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense_of_Marriage_Act

about 10 months ago

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