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Comments

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Teachers Know If You've Been E-Reading

Scarred Intellect Re:Disconcerting? (348 comments)

Some schools are even requiring faculty to carry cellphones and be on call so that when Little Johnny Baseballhat realizes he needs an answer, we can turn to and present.

Holy fucking shit are you serious?! What about the parents? Where the fuck are they?

Please tell me I'm misunderstanding you, that you're not implying that your required to be available so that students can call you on your off-hours for a question on homework. Please tell me this isn't what you meant.

I've had teachers in the past who gave us their numbers (I'm talking high-school, here) voluntarily, but none were every required to.

about a year and a half ago
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Automated System Developed To Grade Student Essays

Scarred Intellect Re:This is horrid (253 comments)

I've got that for Chemistry AND Physics. It's horrible. I've entirely missed problems because I couldn't figure out how it wanted the answer represented.

I mirror your sentiment exactly:

The teacher couldn't be bothered to assign and grade proper homework.

The kicker is that teachers who DO assign real homework have TA's or graders to grade the homework, all they actually grade are our tests.

Oh yea, and I have to pay extra for this online bullshit. It's required in a more in-depth way than textbooks (I literally can't pass the course without it) but isn't paid by the school, it's paid by me alongside my already-ridiculously overpriced textbook.

Yes, I have to pay for the teacher to be lazy.

about a year and a half ago
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Six of Hanford's Nuclear Waste Tanks Leaking Badly

Scarred Intellect My understanding (221 comments)

Talking with the guys that do this at a job fair.

First, what could take so freaking long to clean stuff up? "Stuff you don't understand." Right, bureaucracy, nothing else.

Anyway, the waste from Hanford was stored in Single-Shelled Tanks (SSTs), until they later started storing it in Double-Shelled Tanks (DST's). The SST's are leaking, we know this, so this is not news. What's currently being done is pumping the waste from the leaking SST's into the DST's and cleaning the SST's. They do this because the vitrification plant is not built yet.

They're out of DST's. So now they have to decide whether to build more DST's or expedite the vit plant. Basically a few million dollars now, a few billion dollars now, or a few million dollars now AND a few billion dollars later.

I got to school at the WSU campus nearby, and this is all I've been able to get someone to tell me. Correct me if I'm wrong. I probably am.

Oh. Right. Safety. This stuff's NASTY. That's been holding it up for over 20 years.

about a year and a half ago
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Tech Leaders Create Most Lucrative Science Prize In History

Scarred Intellect Re:And yet it still pales .. (147 comments)

And yet the amount of money still pales in comparison to what pro athletes make per game.

FTFY. Though I'm sure some pro athletes make somewhat less per game. It still is ridiculous; depressed economy my ass!

about a year and a half ago
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Halo Developer Bungie Reveals Destiny and Its Vision of MMO Gaming

Scarred Intellect Re:Not coming to PC (147 comments)

Halo is different from other console FPSes. I don't know why, what it is...

Probably due to the sluggish and slow controls. You mention Quake, compare the movement in Quake to the movement in Halo. Halo is much slower. Even if you turn the sensitivity on Halo up to 10, it still moves slower than default Quake.

The "less twitchy" you mention is exactly what makes a FPS work on a console. Joysticks are harder to control in such small, quick movements with only a thumb. Mouse, which is being moved with your whole hand, and has a much wider range of movement (can physically move farther) so it can be further customized and tweaked to interpret twitches better.

At least, that's my take on it all.

about a year and a half ago
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Are Plastic Bag Bans Making People Sick?

Scarred Intellect Re:Y R Peeple So Stupid? (533 comments)

It's actually a security Torx; meaning it's a Torx with a hole in the center, that even MORE people don't have a driver for compared to regular Torx. I can understand most people not being able to disassemble it because of that. In fact, that's the exact reason it's a security Torx, just so people can't get into it. But that doesn't stop someone with a bit of thought from cleaning it thoroughly anyway; hot soapy water, bleach solution...many options besides just throwing it in the dishwasher and calling it good.

I happen to have one, and don't have any problems with mold or anything. I just make sure and flush the entire thing in hot soapy water every time I wash it. It's really not that difficult, just gotta not be lazy, and America isn't good at that anymore.

about a year and a half ago
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Are Plastic Bag Bans Making People Sick?

Scarred Intellect Re:Y R Peeple So Stupid? (533 comments)

Is it really all that hard to realize the things get all sorts of tasty but nasty without refrigeration stuff in them?

Yes, it is. One of the more common complaints against Cabelbak's Better Bottle is that it grows mold, and one didn't even realize it for two years! Amazon Reviews.

Why are people so surprised that you need to clean something? I have one of these, all it takes to clean it is to pull it apart.

about a year and a half ago
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The US Redrawn As 50 Equally Populated States

Scarred Intellect Washington and Oregon (642 comments)

This is interesting. I always assumed (being raised in Washington) that it would be best to divide our state straight down the Cascade Mountains, farther west than the line is in this map.In line with the "tt" of Seattle, the "a" of Tacoma, and continuing towards the central "a" in Shasta.

Many people in Eastern Washington would actually love to see a split like I described, because the west side has too much control over the rest of the state.

about a year and a half ago
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3D Printable Ammo Clip Skirts New Proposed Gun Laws

Scarred Intellect Re:Blood is on the NRA Hands (1862 comments)

we have more gun-related deaths, but we also have significantly less violent crimes overall.

Less than where?

That was covered in my citation. But if you're correct, then even my citation is just another misinterpretation of the statistics...it's hard to find a good, objective source for all of this. Do you know of a better one? Because I'd REALLY like to understand the pro gun control side.

about 2 years ago
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3D Printable Ammo Clip Skirts New Proposed Gun Laws

Scarred Intellect Re:Blood is on the NRA Hands (1862 comments)

Statistics show that if you outlaw guns, those numbers will increase.

Statistics don't mean anything unless they're fully analyzed along with repercussions.

Sure, we have more gun-related deaths, but we also have significantly less violent crimes overall.

Also need to take into account what TYPE of firearm is used in most gun-related crimes (handguns) and wonder why they are banning assault weapons when rifles are used in fewer than 400 per year. My fear is that's it's a stepping stone to more oppressive gun control.

We already know gun bans don't work. Columbine happened with an AR-15 during an assault weapon ban. Anecdots, when used properly, support facts that can be verified. I do agree with you though, the post you responded to does not prove anything, on the other hand neither does yours, nor does mine. Except that anecdotes and statistics can be skewed any way one wants. To truly make a decision, one must know the facts and how they correlate together and then consider it all as a whole.

Cite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8D8b51EwrI

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Linux Mountable Storage Pool For All the Cloud Systems?

Scarred Intellect LVM (165 comments)

Wouldn't a(n) LVM accomplish this? Set up a bunch of logical devices, put them into an LVM, and let that take care of itself?

about 2 years ago
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NVIDIA Unveils GRID Servers, Tegra 4 SoC and Project SHIELD Mobile Gaming Device

Scarred Intellect Re:Wow (109 comments)

That's nothing, read Don Quixote.

about 2 years ago
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Futuristic Highway Will Glow In the Dark For Icy Conditions

Scarred Intellect Wonderful (174 comments)

Another way to pander to idiot drivers, teaching them nothing except that they don't need to be observant or thoughtful drivers.

Back up cameras, back up sensors, blind-spot detectors, cruise control all help to create a less aware driver. Now they'll learn that they don't need to pay attention to the road condition. (Slippery slope argument? Maybe)

I almost ran over my 2 year old nephew one time in my truck (Dodge Ram). I didn't see him, he was behind me where there is NO visibility, sure a back up camera or sensor would have worked, but instead he has a responsible mother who saw and came out screaming and waving her hands to get me to stop (I drive an older diesel so it's a bit noisy). That's all it takes, responsibility. So there goes anyone's "what-if" argument; yes, it did happen to me.

Pay attention to what's around you, if you can't, have others do it. Turn your head to look in your blind spot. Lean to maintain your own steady speed. Learn to identify road conditions, and be able to control your vehicle if it slides that the speed you are going. If you can't control that slide, slow down to a speed that you can control the slide; then, if you do slide, you're OK.

Why do we keep pandering to mediocrity?

Now of course, this is all in general, I'm sure there's some with disabilities that don't allow them to turn their head properly, or maintain even pressure with their foot and whathaveyou.

about 2 years ago
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TSA 'Secured' Metrodome During Recent Football Game

Scarred Intellect Re:Bureaucracy tending towards opression... (364 comments)

Freedom is inherently risky. My fellow Americans need to realize that. To be absolutely safe necessitates living in an absolutely oppressed society.

What do you want, freedom or oppression?

The way it looks now, too many Americans are leaning towards oppression, because being free is just too scary.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Easiest Way To Consolidate Household Media?

Scarred Intellect ownCloud (272 comments)

It's like Dropbox, but everything resides on the server of your choice. Ridiculously easy to set up, literally copy a directory into the web root, set permissions, and done.

Has MOST features Dropbox does, sharing files, access from anywhere...photo gallery, you can open files in the browser with native internal apps..

It gives you the drag-and-drop simplicity of Dropbox with its syncing with nearly the same simplicity to set up.

about 2 years ago
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Give Us Your Personal Data Or Pay Full Fare

Scarred Intellect Re:so... (342 comments)

How many data mining tokens er loyalty cards are in your wallet?

Several, at least 3. And I haven't submitted my information for any of them. They still work fine.

about 2 years ago
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The Web We Lost

Scarred Intellect Re:Uh...it's still there, you know (255 comments)

Reminds me of a Wired article I read for a class one time. The assignment was to read the article and "summarize the directions that commercial use of technology is moving to provide content, away from the open, free web."

I slammed the article in my assignment, calling it out for what it is: bullshit. Of course, one cane make that conclusion just by knowing it's from Wired...

about 2 years ago
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Jammie Thomas Takes Constitutional Argument To SCOTUS

Scarred Intellect Can someone explain.. (146 comments)

I'm not a lawyer, and don't care much for a particularly detailed treatise, but could someone explain why one can't just say "Prove I've never purchased XX movie/song, and am not simply downloading it for a digital archival purpose which I am allowed under Fair Use."?

As I understand Fair Use, one is allowed to have an archival copy of any movie/song (breaking DMCA notwithstanding), so couldn't downloading be considered a more time-efficient method of obtaining your archival copy? And doesn't presumption of innocence mean that they have to PROVE that you never bought the item in the first place, and thus are not allowed your digital archival copy?

I'm sure I'm missing something somewhere.

about 2 years ago
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Australian Police Warn That Apple Maps Could Get Someone Killed

Scarred Intellect Re:Apple bashing (452 comments)

Out in the Palouse in Washington (rolling wheat fields for hours) we had GPS not able to find us. When it finally did, it had us placed in the middle of a wheat field, and told us to take a left on a road that didn't exist. And the Palouse is wide open, you get plenty of satellite reception for GPS signal. Lucky for us we knew where we were and just turned on the GPS to see what it'd say.

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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Racism: It's Not Just For White People Anymore.

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Scarred Intellect (1648867) writes "An article in the Porland Tribune of Porland, OR explains how the peanut butter sandwich is a device of the ruling white and demonstrates white privilege. Or something.

The principle at the local K-12 school states that, in response to a teacher's lesson involving B&J sandwiches: '“Another way would be to say: ‘Americans eat peanut butter and jelly, do you have anything like that?’ Let them tell you. Maybe they eat torta. Or pita.” ' because "...Somali or Hispanic students...might not eat sandwiches."

Comparing ethnicity to race or...country origins? Smart lady. Americans aren't a race.

The article goes on to discuss how it's OK to have a Latino and black boys' drum class but we need to avoid anything that emphasizes the white privilege. Gutierrez, the principle, "vehemently rejects any suggestion that it is discrimination to offer a club catering to minority boys."

She brings this program of Courageous Conversations from California (which probably explains everything).

While further down in the article Gutierrez has seemingly made some impressive improvements in the quality of education, she seems desperately misguided in saying that '“When white people do it, it is not a problem, but if it’s for kids of color, then it’s a problem?” says Gutierrez, 40, an El Paso, Texas, native whose parents were Mexican immigrants. “Break it down for me. That’s your white privilege, and your whiteness.”'"

Link to Original Source
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Co-op hydro-power at risk under new DOE scheme

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Scarred Intellect (1648867) writes "A new proposal by US Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will alter the mission of Power Maketing Administrations (such as Bonneville Power Administration, which administrates electricity between multiple dams, wind farms, and natural gas plants throughout the Northwest) and threaten electricity costs.

Sec. Chu served notice that PMAs would serve as laboratories to test various energy initiatives. These energy initiatives will increase the cost and could adversely affect the reliability of power provided by the PMAs.

Electric cooperative members, will pay the additional cost of these energy initiatives while consumers elsewhere would receive any benefits.

I seem to recall hearing about news of this sort of research from several DOE laboratories. It's almost like we already have a National Renewable Energy Laboratory and programs at various other locations."
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Best second major for a mechanical engineer

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Scarred Intellect writes "After attending DigiPen Institute of Technology and deciding that I liked the idea of programming more than programming itself (I still do enjoy it a bit); after getting my AA at a community college with no direction; after much tinkering with engines growing up; after 4 years of service in the US Marine Corps infantry; I have finally decided what I want to do when I grow up: mechanical engineering.

The reason is simple, I believe our automobiles can be a lot better (in terms of engine/propulsion) than they are now. The technology exists, there's more technology to develop for them. I've taken an intense interest in biodiesel and other clean alternative energy sources (fuel cells being one of my favorite, second is solar, with wind being last) and enjoy simply making things work. So I figured mechanical engineering. It'll give me a broad understanding of the more specific engineering disciplines, and I think that is what I need.

My uncle, also a mechanical engineer (Master's degree) suggested I get a second major in computer science to complement ME. Sounds like a good idea to me, I could mate mechanical processes with computer controls pretty effectively.

I've currently got my AA and all the humanities out of the way, but the program will still take me 3 or 4 years to complete due to scheduling and pre-requisites and such, so I'll be have to plan more to maintain a full schedule (to keep the full benefits of the GI Bill).

So what does the Slashdot crowd think? ME + CS? Or ME + something else? I'll almost definitely have a math minor coming out of this."

Journals

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From Congressman Doc Hastings, RE: CISPA

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Mr. [REDACTED]

Dear [REDACTED]:

Thank you for contacting me regarding your concerns with the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act. I appreciate you taking the time to share your views with me.

Protection from constant cyber attacks is critical to our national and economic security. Cyber threats from nations, such as China, as well as individuals and groups are rapidly growing. I believe it is critical that the public and private sectors work together to protect against these unauthorized attacks aimed at stealing personal and government information, while at the same time ensuring that the Constitutional civil liberties and privacy of Americans are protected.

On April 26, 2012, the House of Representatives passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act by a bipartisan vote of 248 to 168. This bill would establish procedures allowing our intelligence community to share cyber threat information with American companies that have been inspected and vetted. I certainly understand your concerns with regard to privacy issues and government accountability and you should know that these are not issues I take lightly. However, I am pleased that because concerns such as yours were raised, the final version of this bill that I supported included several provisions to limit the federal government's power. It is important to emphasize that this bill does not give the federal government the authority to monitor or access private sector networks. The government will not be able to stop access to particular websites, require companies to provide any information, censor or remove content. Additionally, this bill will sunset after five years from the date of enactment. This guarantees Congress will be able to reevaluate, debate potential concerns, address issues, and make any necessary reforms to the law before it's extended.

I believe this bill strikes the proper balance of protecting Americans' constitutional right to privacy and holding the federal government accountable, while allowing U.S. businesses to better protect their networks and private customer information from cyber attacks.

Again, thank you for taking the time to contact me on this important issue. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future on matters of importance to you.

Sincerely,

Doc Hastings
Member of Congress

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Raising electricity rates by funding the nation's energy research

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Sent to Patty Murray, Maria Cantwell, and Doc Hastings.

I received the following letter from Benton REA:

+++++++++++++++++++++++

For more than 70 years electric cooperatives have partnered with the nation's Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs), which includes the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The purpose of the PMAs is to market the electricity generated at federal dams. The dams and the energy they produce serve millions of Americans from the Deep South to the Pacific Northwest. From the outset, the dams have provided flood control, recreation and electric power, all critical elements necessary to foster economic stability to adjacent communities. As public works projects, the sale of electricity generated at the dams paid for them, without negatively impacting other taxpayers. The electricity from the dams is delivered to end users through their member owned electric cooperatives or municipal utilities.

Electric cooperatives like Benton REA deliver affordable, reliable electric power from the PMAs and help the member/owners solve problems locally. A proposal by U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will alter the mission of the PMAs, and will threaten Benton REAâ(TM)s ability to continue delivery of affordable, reliable electric power. In March, Sec. Chu served notice that PMAs would serve as laboratories to test various energy initiatives. These energy initiatives will increase the cost and could adversely affect the reliability of power provided by the PMAs.

Electric cooperative members, including members of Benton REA will pay the additional cost of these energy initiatives while consumers elsewhere would receive any benefits. The Board and I, along with many other co-op leaders in our state, don't believe the BPA should be a laboratory for experimental energy initiatives. We do not believe that the mission of the BPA should be changed, especially if there is potential to negatively affect the rates or reliability of the power we purchase from BPA. Please take a few minutes to contact Congressman Doc Hastings, Senator Maria Cantwell and Senator Patty Murray and let your views on Secretary of Energy Steven Chuâ(TM)s proposal be known. We will do our best to protect low cost, reliable, and renewable hydropower for you and other northwest ratepayers. I will keep you informed of any changes as we work to resolve this matter.

Sincerely,

General Manager, Benton REA

+++++++++++++++++++++++

We have laboratories dedicated to research of renewable fuels. I recently toured Pacific Northwest National Laborator's renewable fuels program. There are numerous other Department of Energy labs throughout the country, http://energy.gov/offices.

It is the DOE's responsibility, through their labs, not rural electric cooperatives and associations, to research new energies for the nation. It is fine for rural groups to research on their own, but not to be mandated to do so which would raise local rates. Further, the DOE already has the National Renewable Energy Laboratory dedicated to such things. This is a misuse of a resource that should be left as it is. We've already seen rises in electricity costs due to maintenance issues coming up that were inadequately planned for, we don't need to fund the nation's research as well.

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Raising electricity rates to fund the nation's energy research

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Sent to Patty Murray, Maria Cantwell, and Doc Hastings.

I received the following letter from Benton REA:

+++++++++++++++++++++++

For more than 70 years electric cooperatives have partnered with the nation's Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs), which includes the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The purpose of the PMAs is to market the electricity generated at federal dams. The dams and the energy they produce serve millions of Americans from the Deep South to the Pacific Northwest. From the outset, the dams have provided flood control, recreation and electric power, all critical elements necessary to foster economic stability to adjacent communities. As public works projects, the sale of electricity generated at the dams paid for them, without negatively impacting other taxpayers. The electricity from the dams is delivered to end users through their member owned electric cooperatives or municipal utilities.

Electric cooperatives like Benton REA deliver affordable, reliable electric power from the PMAs and help the member/owners solve problems locally. A proposal by U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will alter the mission of the PMAs, and will threaten Benton REAâ(TM)s ability to continue delivery of affordable, reliable electric power. In March, Sec. Chu served notice that PMAs would serve as laboratories to test various energy initiatives. These energy initiatives will increase the cost and could adversely affect the reliability of power provided by the PMAs.

Electric cooperative members, including members of Benton REA will pay the additional cost of these energy initiatives while consumers elsewhere would receive any benefits. The Board and I, along with many other co-op leaders in our state, don't believe the BPA should be a laboratory for experimental energy initiatives. We do not believe that the mission of the BPA should be changed, especially if there is potential to negatively affect the rates or reliability of the power we purchase from BPA. Please take a few minutes to contact Congressman Doc Hastings, Senator Maria Cantwell and Senator Patty Murray and let your views on Secretary of Energy Steven Chuâ(TM)s proposal be known. We will do our best to protect low cost, reliable, and renewable hydropower for you and other northwest ratepayers. I will keep you informed of any changes as we work to resolve this matter.

Sincerely,

General Manager, Benton REA

+++++++++++++++++++++++

We have laboratories dedicated to research of renewable fuels. I recently toured Pacific Northwest National Laborator's renewable fuels program. There are numerous other Department of Energy labs throughout the country, http://energy.gov/offices.

It is the DOE's responsibility, through their labs, not rural electric cooperatives and associations, to research new energies for the nation. It is fine for rural groups to research on their own, but not to be mandated to do so which would raise local rates. Further, the DOE already has the National Renewable Energy Laboratory dedicated to such things. This is a misuse of a resource that should be left as it is. We've already seen rises in electricity costs due to maintenance issues coming up that were inadequately planned for, we don't need to fund the nation's research as well.

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Response from Maria Cantwell; RE: CISPA

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Dear REDACTED,

Thank you for contacting me regarding the cybersecurity legislation. I appreciate hearing from you on this important issue.

Our nation's businesses, critical infrastructure, and communities are all vulnerable to malicious cyber activity on the computer networks that increasingly connect us all. These malicious actions could be taken by individuals acting alone, organized groups of hackers, foreign companies, and even other nation states. The question is not if the nation should prepare itself, but rather how we should prepare ourselves to protect our critical computer systems and related assets. I believe our approach to cyber security needs to be risk-based, cost-effective, and pursued as a partnership between the federal government and the private sector.

There have been several bills introduced this Congress regarding cybersecurity. I would like to describe briefly the two primary Senate bills.

Senator Joseph Lieberman (ID-CT) introduced the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 (S. 2105) on February 14, 2012. The proposed legislation has been referred to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs where it is currently awaiting further review. If enacted, this proposed legislation would establish a framework where the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) consults with stakeholders to determine systems which computer systems and assets across the various sectors of our economy face the greatest immediate risk. The proposed legislation would establish a procedure for the designation of companies that own and/or operate the covered "critical infrastructure" and would identify existing cybersecurity standards or develop new risk-based cybersecurity performance requirements when necessary; and would implement cyber response and restoration plans. Each covered company develops its own security plans. Each covered company would have the option of self-certifying it meets the requirements or it can have an approved third party certify compliance with the requirements. Companies in substantial compliance with the performance requirements at the time of a cyber-incident would receive protection from any punitive damages associated from the incident. This framework for cybersecurity only applies to computer systems and assets within the sectors of the economy that are not already covered by existing requirements.

Additionally, the Act would make improvement to the cyber security of critical federal information technology systems; streamline cybersecurity efforts at DHS; requires DHS to implement a cybersecurity outreach and awareness program; establish a program to develop and recruit more individuals to work in cybersecurity; require the development of a national cyber security R&D plan and establishment of a basis cybersecurity R&D program at the National Science Foundation; authorize private entities to disclose or receive lawfully obtained cybersecurity threat information to protect an information system; establish a process to designate "cybersecurity exchanges" so that public and private sector organizations can share information; and provide a legal safe harbor for entities engaged in cybersecurity monitoring activities.

Senator John McCain (R-AZ) introduced the Strengthening and Enhancing Cybersecurity by Using Research, Education, Information, and Technology (SECURE IT) Act (S. 2151) on March 1, 2012. The proposed legislation has been referred to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation where it is awaiting further review. If enacted, this proposed legislation would encourage private sector companies to share cyber threat information with other private sector companies and the federal government, but requires federal contractors to share cyber threat information with the federal government if it provides communications services or cybersecurity services to the federal government and the threat is directly related to those services. The Act also updates the Federal Information Security Management Act, strengthening the Federal Government's capacity to better protect federal civilian networks from cyber vulnerabilities. It increases criminal penalties for cybercrimes and prioritizes existing cybersecurity research.

The United States has always been seen as a leader on Internet issues. Laws we establish in the United States regarding the Internet are likely to be used as models around the world. And because the Internet is global in nature, it is important that we carefully consider how the laws and policies we adopt in this area may be received and translated by other countries. Please be assured that I will keep your thoughts in mind should I have the opportunity to vote on this or similar legislation regarding cybersecurity.

Thank you again for contacting me to share your thoughts on this matter. You may also be interested in signing up for periodic updates for Washington State residents. If you are interested in subscribing to this update, please visit my website at http://cantwell.senate.gov. Please do not hesitate to contact me in the future if I can be of further assistance.

Sincerely,
Maria Cantwell
United States Senator

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Letter to WA state senators; RE: CISPA

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

In the name of security we have the TSA, I am sure you are familiar with their current situation. Allow me a moment to elaborate: strip-searching old women, patting down an 4 year old girl, targeting female passengers with full-body scans, smuggling...all in the name of fighting terrorism while at the same time providing the largest terrorist threat: insecure security checkpoints. For more details, a quick search on Google will yield sufficient results.

TSA needs to be shut down, they accomplish nothing but necessitating a ridiculously large crowd that is easy for a bomber to target. Since these crowds don't get bombed, there is no significant terrorist threat, and the TSA is useless. But I digress, the TSA is only one way in which the government has been crushing our liberties.

In the name of security we now have the CISPA (Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act). The goal again being a more secure internet. What we don't need is a more secure internet, the internet is secure enough for those who care enough (encryption via PGP, VPN's, E-mail anonymizers, etc.). What we do need is privacy. This bill threatens privacy too much; it is also too similar in scope to SOPA.

The 4th Amendment to our Constitution, which I am sure you swore an oath to uphold, states that "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." CISPA is in direct conflict with our Constitutional rights. The argument could be made that the 4th Amendment doesn't mention the internet because it, and its issues, didn't exist when it was written, but one must take into consideration Original Intent; further, I the phrase "and effects" should adequately account for internet information.

There are better ways that the goals of CISPA can be achieved, and they do not involve disclosure of private data to determine online threats. If you are unaware of these better ways, then you have no reason to be voting on such issues until you become better informed.

One of the goals of CISPA is to assist in reporting/detecting cybersecurity. That is all well and good, and can be done with ONLY IP Addresses and does not need to contain personal information of any sort.

In the name of security we have allowed ourselves to be deluded into abandoning our rights and allowing the government to strip us of our rights and convenience so that we can be safer. Catchall phrases such as "to protect against terrorism," "for the children," and "for national security" have been used all too much to justify blatant abuses of the government's power.

In the name of security our country has maintained the USA PATRIOT act, an act originally intended to be short-lived.

In the name of security we have become absurdly inconvenienced when traveling, had our privacy dissolved, and many basic rights washed away. This needs to end.

In the name of security we have allowed the terrorists to win: we have a government consistently and continually crushing our rights and eroding our freedoms, and this once-great nation is now the laughing stock of the free world because we are a disturbingly pitiful former shadow of ourselves.

As a US Marine Corps infantry machinegunner, voter, and citizen of Washington State and of the United States of America, I strongly urge you to vote against CISPA when the time comes.

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To Congressman Doc Hastings; RE CISPA

Scarred Intellect Scarred Intellect writes  |  more than 2 years ago

In the name of security we have the TSA, I am sure you are familiar with their current situation. Allow me a moment to elaborate: strip-searching old women, patting down an 4 year old girl, targeting female passengers with full-body scans, smuggling...all in the name of fighting terrorism while at the same time providing the largest terrorist threat: insecure security checkpoints. For more details, a quick search on Google will yield sufficient results.

TSA needs to be shut down, they accomplish nothing but necessitating a ridiculously large crowd that is easy for a bomber to target. Since these crowds don't get bombed, there is no significant terrorist threat, and the TSA is useless. But I digress, the TSA is only one way in which the government has been crushing our liberties.

In the name of security we now have the CISPA (Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act). The goal again being a more secure internet. What we don't need is a more secure internet, the internet is secure enough for those who care enough (PGP, VPN's, E-mail anonymizers, etc.). What we do need is privacy. This bill threatens privacy too much; it is also too similar in scope to SOPA. I sent you a letter about SOPA, and though it wasn't in your consideration, you said you would keep these views in mind "should legislation regarding internet regulation come before the House of Representatives" (Letter to REDACTED, Jan 19, 2012). You also state "It is imperative that we recognize the need to balance the freedom promised by the Internet with the responsibility to protect the rights of consumers and businesses."

The 4th Amendment to our Constitution, which I am sure you swore an oath to uphold, states that "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized." CISPA is in direct conflict with our Constitutional rights. The argument could be made that the 4th Amendment doesn't mention the internet because it, and its issues, didn't exist when it was written, but one must take into consideration Original Intent; further, I the phrase "and effects" should adequately account for internet information.

You have failed as a representative.

There are better ways that the goals of CISPA can be achieved, and they do not involve disclosure of private data to determine online threats. If you are unaware of these better ways, then you have no reason to be voting on such issues until you become better informed.

One of the goals of CISPA is to assist in reporting/detecting cybersecurity. That is all well and good, and can be done with ONLY IP Addresses and does not need to contain personal information of any sort.

In the name of security we have allowed ourselves to be deluded into abandoning our rights and allowing the government to strip us of our rights and convenience so that we can be safer. Catchall phrases such as "to protect against terrorism," "for the children," and "for national security" have been used all too much to justify blatant abuses of the government's power.

In the name of security our country has maintained the USA PATRIOT act, an act originally intended to be short-lived.

In the name of security we have become absurdly inconvenienced when traveling, had our privacy dissolved, and many basic rights washed away. This needs to end.

In the name of security we have allowed the terrorists to win: we have a government consistently and continually crushing our rights and eroding our freedoms, and this once-great nation is now the laughing stock of the free world because we are a disturbingly pitiful former shadow of ourselves.

As a US Marine Corps infantry machinegunner, I am ashamed of our government.

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