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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:Tax? (321 comments)

The difference is that when you make someone who starts up a business pay all of the country's taxes, they're forced to simply pass that along to consumers as higher prices. The consumers pay the taxes regardless, always. Businesses can't exist without people buying their goods and services.

10 hours ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:Tax? (321 comments)

If there's a company with a plant, they probably also need protection from the fire department. Shouldn't they pay for this?

Yes, and most cases such services are paid through property taxes. If the company owns the plant and its grounds, they pay substantial property taxes. If they lease the property, the property's owner does (and passes those costs along in the lease).

We're not talking about property taxes, we're talking about income taxes.

2 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:Not the only strategy (321 comments)

Right. Just the other day the Motley Fool published effective tax rates. That takes into account not just federal taxes but aveerage state/provincial tales and other tax-related burdens that actually get paid in real life by actual companies doing actual business in all the countries they list. The effective rate for businesses in the US is 40%. The second highest, behind only the UAE.

3 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:Tax? (321 comments)

Yes but at a lower rate. Investment income is taxed lower than standard wages.

Right. Usually, that's because:

1) We want people to risk their money making investments to start and grow businesses. That creates economic activity, which is taxed.

2) If the person risking their money on such an investment loses it (as most do - most new businesses fail), they do NOT get to write that loss off on their own income taxes. It's just gone, goodbye. 3) The lower rates only apply if you let the investment site for a good long time. Those who throw money in and yank it back up pay a much higher rate.

businesses and the people who profit from them

Employees ARE people who profit from a business. In fact employees account for the vast majority of the outbound cash that most businesses spend. And its taxed at normal payroll rates. And the taxes levied on the money those people are getting out of the company are a big part of what pays for the public infrastructure that they (as the people who are making money daily in the business) use. Why do you think that city, county, state, and federal programs to encourage business presence and growth aren't hesitant to wave, for some period of time, taxes charged directly to the business? It's because the net result of establishing that business in place and keeping it there is MUCH MORE TAX REVENUE - from all of the other activity and employment that results.

3 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:Not the only strategy (321 comments)

How would jacking up income tax rates help with that problem? It only makes it worse.

3 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:Tax? (321 comments)

Companies use infrastructure to deliver goods to their customers ... Companies benefit from local education systems to provide knowledgable people (arguably).

But the company doesn't do anything with the money except spend it on growing the company, or in compensation to employees and investors. When those investors or employees take money home from the company, it's taxed. And if those same people take that already taxed money and invest it that or another company, and it makes money, they get taxed again.

The company doesn't benefit from services and education, etc., the people WHO TAKE HOME THE MONEY do (at which point it's taxed). They other group that benefits are company's customers, who spend money (on which they've already paid other taxes) to buy goods or services from that company. And that means nothing until, again, somebody takes it home as pay (taxed) or dividends (taxed) or cashed out stocks (taxed).

The company's actual profits shouldn't be taxed because all that money does is sit there until somebody either spends it on the company as reinvestment (which isn't taxed anyway), or it gets turned over to somebody designated to receive it - at which point it IS taxed as income.

3 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:'Pass it on to the consumer' (321 comments)

If that is true, then the taxes won't cut into profits, so the businesses won't raise any objections to the taxes.

Of course they will, if they're competing with companies that operate elsewhere with a 15% lower tax rate.

3 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Re:Not the only strategy (321 comments)

It's a race to the bottom, my friend. You don't out-compete countries with less than a few million inhabitants and no significant social programs.

You mean, like Canada? It has a 26% rate, compared the US's 40% rate. Yeah, third-world hell holes like Canada always whore around with those low numbers, right?

3 days ago
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

ScentCone Not the only strategy (321 comments)

There are other ways to generate more tax revenue from business operations in the US: quit making elsewhere so much more attractive. The US has the second highest effective business tax burden in the world (second only to the United Arab Emerates, which mostly taxes foreign oil operations). Gee, I wonder why businesses born in the US look to mitigate that in whatever ways the law allows. If the law no longer allows it, there will simply be more companies actually moving, entirely, to places with a lower burden. Then the government will still miss the revenue, and they'll miss all the tax revenue they're already getting on the income taxes levied on and other economic activity generated by all of the company's current domestic employees, partners, vendors, service providers, etc.

3 days ago
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A 16-Year-Old Builds a Device To Convert Breath Into Speech

ScentCone A hundred times less? (67 comments)

Grrr.

Sure if thing A is inexpensive, then thing B which costs a fraction of that price might indeed be said to cost X times less. Implying that thing A is already less than some other option, and thing B is even MORE less.

But if thing A is very expensive (as in the example cited in TFA), thing B would be better described as being not a hundred times less ... but one hundredth the cost.

4 days ago
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Drone-Based Businesses: Growing In Canada, Grounded In the US

ScentCone Re:Do We Want Our Gov't to regulate the drones? (94 comments)

*twirls finger around head* cuckoo cuckoo... looks like the loonies are taking over slashdot lol

So, let's see ... the administration publishes a written interpretation of a law they don't like, and you think it's crazy to report that fact?

Obviously it's nothing new for the Obama administration to simply ignore statutory requirements (see his unilateral re-writing of features of the ACA entirely for political expediency), and this is simply another case of it. But what's interesting is that you are obviously either ignorant of their specific language in the new "interpretation" of the law in question, or you're well aware of the implications and are just doing your best to wish it away through childish ad hominem. Classic lefty sycophantism. Or, I'll just give you the benefit of the doubt, and tell you to go read their published intention to twist the law into an implementation that is 180 degrees opposite to its plain, so you can come back here and argue the details instead of stamping your feet like an eight year old girl.

5 days ago
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Drone-Based Businesses: Growing In Canada, Grounded In the US

ScentCone Re:Do We Want Our Gov't to regulate the drones? (94 comments)

ROFL.
Obama's out to stop the drone entrepenaurs!
ITS ALL A CONSPIRACY!!

It's not a conspiracy, coward. It's published policy. Your decision to trot out ad hominem in place of addressing the basic facts of the matter shows you know I'm right. That you're posting as a coward makes it even more clear. But keep propping up your pet administration, man. The documents they publish - you know, the ones that have been amply covered in both aviation news and general media of all sorts - make this all very clear. The agency has just been sued by multiple parties over the 'interpretation' document and policy position in question. But please, don't trouble yourself to keep up with the news - that would take the fun out of your shrill, drooling Obama fanboyism.

about a week ago
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Drone-Based Businesses: Growing In Canada, Grounded In the US

ScentCone Re:Do We Want Our Gov't to regulate the drones? (94 comments)

This is that anti-job anti-business Obama's fault!

To which I respond: [citation needed].

You actually need a citation to believe that the director of the FAA is a political appointee? You are that unaware of how federal agencies are run by the executive branch of the government? You don't need a citation, you need a remedial course in basic civics. Please return to the conversation when you understand the basic structure of the government.

about a week ago
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Drone-Based Businesses: Growing In Canada, Grounded In the US

ScentCone Re:Do We Want Our Gov't to regulate the drones? (94 comments)

Yes, and congress passed a law requiring the FAA to produce such regulations in a timely fashion due in this coming year. The administration has said they will not obey that law, and will not have such a framework in anything like the timely fashion required.

In the meantime, the administration has published an "interpretation" of the 2012 law that says they take it to mean more or less the exact opposite of its plain intent, and they are busy getting ready to fine people for doing things like participating in RC competitions (you know, like we've been having for decades) that happen to involve things like $20 cash prizes ... because that's commercial drone use! The employees of US-based companies that have for years stepped out back of their shops to test-fly a new RC airplane or multirotor will, according to the Obama administration's new interpretation, be breaking the law and subject to substantial fines for being paid to fly unmanned aerial systems. We can't have that! Quick! Shut down all of those businesses and jobs! Chase those retailers out of the country!

It's preposterous. We're not just dragging behind the rest of the world, we're actively taking steps backwards. The administration is deliberately, purposefully, putting the brakes on what would otherwise be a multi-billion dollar industry full of innovation and attractive to STEM-types in this country. The left's instinct to Nanny State their way down into every last aspect of what someone might do to conduct some business (hey, kid, quit flying your $250, 2-pound plastic quad-copter with a cheap camera over your neighbor's roof because he asked you to, and said he'd give you $25 to get pictures of his roof gutters for him - if you don't cease and desist such commercial UAV operations, that's going to be a $10,000 fine!) means they can't simply clone the sort of framework that the UK or Canada have long had in place ... no, there's got to be a way to make it all MORE miserable, MORE expensive, MORE punitive, and nearly impossible for small entrepreneurs to get into - because otherwise we might miss out on some more federal fees, and intrusive paperwork.

And as usual, the very idiots that we'd most worry about anyway, who will be getting a drone from Amazon tomorrow and flying it over a park full of kids an hour later without any understanding of safe operations or good manners, will completely ignore the FAA's rules/guidance/regs anyway. The government, which is here to help you, will only be placing the painful burden and expense on the very people who are the most responsible anyway: those with a lot to lose because they're in business to use the technology.

More Hope and Change, hard at work for our economy. Yes, Obama's man Huerta at the FAA is a political appointee and that aspect of the food chain lays the FAA's entire posture on this squarely at the door of the White House.

about a week ago
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California Declares Carpooling Via Ride-Share Services Illegal

ScentCone Re:Carpooling should be as free as speech (288 comments)

In the future, when the world is more enlightened, freedom to trade will be as much a basic right as speech is today.

No. The same collectivist and PC-style urges that currently act to prevent free expression will continue to further intercede when you seek to trade with someone. Why? Because there will always be people who think it's unfair that you and someone else have found a mutually beneficial reason to interact, and they will use the force of government to take a piece of that benefit, pay career middlemen in the government to handle it, and hand some of that benefit over to other people who didn't manage to make that transaction happen for themselves. That trend has been increasing, not decreasing. Places like academia and mass media are now LESS free places, for expression, and the market is an increasingly less free place in which to transact business between any two given parties. The "in the future" you envision is a fantasy. That horse has left the barn, and the nanny staters have won.

about a week ago
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Cuba Calculates Cost of 54yr US Embargo At $1.1 Trillion

ScentCone Re: US is... (534 comments)

So your constitution doesn't exactly spell out what dignity exactly is, or what "quality" actually means in constitutionally mandated "quality housing for all citizens" - but it's not an entitlement, it's actually a "right" defined in the constitution, right? You said it's a clause there. Which is it? Does the constitution get dirty in describing specific wealth transfer entitlement program details, or not?

about a week ago
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Cuba Calculates Cost of 54yr US Embargo At $1.1 Trillion

ScentCone Re: US is... (534 comments)

The housing thing is an entitlement not a right. What I said was that if you qualify for the entitlement the dignity right prevents government from giving you a new cardboard box and calling it "housing assistance".

OK, so indeed, if you pass a certain test, you have the power to make the government take something from other people, and give it to you. And your constitution guarantees that only can that happen, but it has to happen with a certain amount of style. Not enough style, and it's undignified, right? So: who decides how many square feet of entitlement home is constitutionally dignified? How does the constitution lay out the definition of dignified where the rubber meets the road and you have to decide how much of someone else's work day should be spent building a kitchen for somebody else? Specifically.

about a week ago
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Cuba Calculates Cost of 54yr US Embargo At $1.1 Trillion

ScentCone Re:US is... (534 comments)

So just to be clear, you're saying that some people in your country have the right to force other people in your country give them stuff.

about a week ago
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Cuba Calculates Cost of 54yr US Embargo At $1.1 Trillion

ScentCone Re:US is... (534 comments)

Much of what you're saying seems based on a (all to common) fundamental misunderstanding of rights and the constitution. In the US, our rights are not defined there. The constitution exists to document the ways in which the government's power (to interfere with our rights) is limited. It does also lay out a limited range of things the government must do (defense, that sort of thing) and the structure of the branches of government ... but the point of the charter isn't to set up a laundry list of our rights. It's to remind everyone that rights (say, to assemble or speak, etc) are "natural," and that given the tendency of people in power to abuse things, we have a chartering document that points out the limits on the government's power - and it expressly mentions some hot-button areas that the document's authors knew would come up. Like speech, assembly, self defense, and the like.

You don't have "more rights" because more of them are listed. Nobody has a "right" to housing in the same way they have a right to freedom of speech. You're confusing government-run entitlement programs, paid for with taxes taken from one person and given to another, with "rights." They are not the same thing. A "right to dignity" as it relates to the government should only be mentioned in the sense that such a clause would prevent the government from actively doing something that removes someone's "dignity" (an impossibly elastic word that is more or less chosen for its inability to be commonly understood or defined).

A rational, constitutional take on "dignity" (vis a vis homelessness, for example, since you mention it), would be that the government cannot stop you from being charitable and helping somebody else into a home if you see fit. The only way the government can be in the dignity-through-housing-paid-for-by-someone-else business is to reduce someone else's dignity by making them spend part of their day as a slave working to prop up the "dignity" (read as: having stuff) of another guy. When you can wave the magic "dignity" wand and use it to remove something from one person and give it to another, that cries out for a very precise definition of dignity.

How many square meters of kitchen space is required in order to be dignified? If I have to spend some of the 12+ hours I'll spend working today in order to make a deposit in someone else's dignity fund, I'm left less able to afford my own kitchen than I otherwise would be. What if I feel undignified in an 800 square foot apartment, but would feel like I would finally have my dignity in a 1000 square foot space? Should I have the right to make you, with the government ready to back me up by seizure and force and imprisonment of you if you're not cooperative, give me the difference in rent every month? Talking about such things in terms of "rights" is completely misguided.

about a week ago

Submissions

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ELF Knocks Down AM Towers To Save Earth, Intercoms

ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  about 5 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "The ELF (Earth Liberation Front) has claimed responsibility for destroying the primary AM towers used by KRKO in Washington state. From their statement, 'AM radio waves cause adverse health effects including a higher rate of cancer, harm to wildlife, and that the signals have been interfering with home phone and intercom lines.' The poor intercom performance must have been the last straw."
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Three Indicted In Very Big Identity/Data Breach

ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "Three New Jersey-ites have been indicted in a crack/breach caper that netted them 130 million credit/debit card records and other sensitive info. Astonishingly, this was chalked up to SQL injection attacks, with data stolen from Heartland (a large card processing operation), 7-Eleven, and a grocery chain. The man named in the indictment, Albert Gonzalez, is already waiting trial for his alleged involvement in similar attacks on other retailers and restaurant chains in 2008. DoJ says the new data theft is the largest on record. Anybody recently buy a Slurpee with a credit card?"
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Michael Crichton, 66, has died of cancer.

ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "Author Michael Crichton has died of cancer . The guy behind the Adromeda Strain and Jurassic Park, and a deliberate irritant in the global warming debate ("If we put everything in the hands of experts and if we say that as intelligent outsiders, we are not qualified to look over the shoulder of anybody, then we're in some kind of really weird world.") was 66, and has one more novel waiting in the wings."
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China Says It Lacks Skills To Hack US Systems

ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "A spokesman for China's foreign ministry says that — China being the "developing nation" that it is — he doubts that his country has the sophistication to hack foreign systems. This in response to statements by two congressmen regarding apparent probing by China-based crackers into congressional systems for information about communication between US officials and activists in China."
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Mankind damages universe by looking at it.

ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "The Telegraph covers a New Scientist report (subscribers only) about two US comsologists who suggest that, a la Schrodinger's possibly unhappy cat, the act of obvserving certain facets of our universe may have shortened its life . FTA, 'Prof Krauss says that the measurement of the light from supernovae in 1998, which provided evidence of dark energy, may have reset the decay of the void to zero — back to a point when the likelihood of its surviving was falling rapidly.' Warning: if you've read this summary, you may have already changed the article."
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ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "In hopes of disrupting small droplets of water before they are able to form into an approaching storm's fruit-damaging hail, some farmers are spending $50K+ each on sonic cannons. Like most, this New Zealand company's gear uses acetylene gas charges. The technique has a long history, but there is continued debate about its effectiveness. Nissan, though, has got their own version to protect lots full of shiny new cars."
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ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "US District Judge James Roberston has directed the US Treasury to start working on a way for the blind to differentiate between printed denominations. He said that the government is violating the Rehabilitaion Act in discriminating against those with a disability. He cites other countries' use of varying currency sizes as evidence that there are solutions, but does not prescribe a particular approach. Possibilities include raised ink and punched holes. Newer bills already support infrared features for use with readers, but such technology gets some complaints. The vending machine industry, which has participated in previous redesign discussions, may have a lot of work to do."
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ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "New Zealand's Qualification Authority (which sets testing standards for the public schools) is confident that those grading papers will understand the meaning of students' responses, even if they use phone/IM-style text-speak. FTA, "credit will be given if the answer 'clearly shows the required understanding,' even if it contains text-speak." Many teachers are not amused, and critics say that the move will devalue NZ's equivalent of a high school diploma."
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ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "A Florida woman made the (unopposed) case that she was defamed and suffered business damages because of what a Louisiana woman was posting about her online. She has no expectation of collecting the money, but says "People are using the Internet to destroy people they don't like, and you can't do that." Libel is libel, but a libeler now has more/easier reach than before, and things like the Google cache add a new dimension."
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ScentCone ScentCone writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ScentCone (795499) writes "North Korea says that it has conducted its first nuclear weapons test and "brought happiness to its people."

Japan and China earlier issued an unusual joint statement saying that such a test would be "unacceptable."

As of 11:10PM EST, the USGS says that it has not detected any unusual seismic activity on the Korean peninsula in the last 48 hours. Is NK's declaring a successful test with no apparent seismic indicators suggesting that they have actually done so just a more over-the-top-than-usual bit of propoganda?"

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