Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

The Department of Homeland Security Needs Its Own Edward Snowden

ScooterComputer Bob: So we just went ahead and fixed the glitch. (190 comments)

The simple way to fix this is just shut the DHS down. It was a bureaucracy conceived in panic: poorly engineered and even more poorly implemented. Just shut it down. Turn all the records over to Congress and start over.

Simple reboot. Fix the glitch. Just like Milton's payroll issue.

about 2 months ago
top

UK Cabinet Office Adopts ODF As Exclusive Standard For Sharable Documents

ScooterComputer Where is Apple? (164 comments)

When iWork first shipped, I asked folks in the know (at Apple) why they chose to design/engineer a completely new suite of file formats rather than adopting/utilizing ODF. I was told it was because ODF wasn't mature enough for their needs, and that it was felt that the ODF working group would be too slow for the iWork development roadmap.

So far, ODF has chugged along, consistently; while iWork has seen a divergence in format compatibility (between Mac and iOS versions) and a complete, from-scratch rewrite (in the most recent version) that torpedoed backwards compatibility.

Enough is enough. If Apple would have embraced ODF, they'd have rocketed the world's move away from Microsoft's Office document stranglehold. Instead, they have squandered both an opportunity to further stomp a odious competitor as well as an opportunity to position their desktop and mobile products as the best commercial competitor for the future where ODF clearly will reign supreme, all in one stupid "Not Invented Here" design decision.

about 2 months ago
top

Turing Test Passed

ScooterComputer Re:Voight-Kampff test? (432 comments)

No...although the original AC's statement is literally correct, the point he was trying to make, that I contradicted myself, is NOT correct, as explained by the second AC. Those SNIPPETS themselves are not questions, but are, in fact, the prefacing components of a longer "question" from a SERIES of questions that any fan of the material I obliquely referenced would have recognized. So the "*Whoosh*" is actually applicable on, and apparently appropriate for, more than one meta level.

I guess some people get and appreciate sly referencing, and others just don't.

about 4 months ago
top

Turing Test Passed

ScooterComputer Voight-Kampff test? (432 comments)

Did anyone ask it the questions we already know will trip up a non-human?

"You're in a desert, walking along in the sand when all of a sudden you look down and see a tortoise..."
"You're watching a stage play. A banquet is in progress. The guests are enjoying an appetizer of raw oysters. The entree consists of boiled dog..."

about 4 months ago
top

52 Million Photos In FBI's Face Recognition Database By Next Year

ScooterComputer Some warnings (108 comments)

1. driver's license photos. There are several states that are already incorporating them into their facial recognition systems. This will accelerate. It needs to stop. (See #2)
2. the accuracy of these systems coupled with the increasing poor job police and investigatory (national security, etc) agencies are doing actually using these kinds of tools means that your chances of getting hit for a false positive is rapidly accelerating. It will wreck lives. It will get people (on both sides) killed.
3. I have been first-hand for discussions whereby state criminal justice officials have boasted about the aforementioned accelerations. There are, absolutely, policies in place in some states to ACTIVELY and AGGRESSIVELY "criminalize" citizens to "get them in the system". This is no conspiracy theory, it IS happening. It has been written about extensively by legal bloggers like Glenn Reynolds at Instapundit and the group over at Volokh Conspiracy. But make no mistake, it is a targeted campaign by authoritative "governments" (I put that in quotes, because they certainly do NOT adhere to the tenets of governance set forth in the founding of the United States, "of, by, and for") against YOU! They are organized, well funded, and committed to success...you will lose.

And this is merely the beginning, as the stories that have already been written warn.

about 5 months ago
top

How Apple's CarPlay Could Shore Up the Car Stereo Industry

ScooterComputer STOLE??? (194 comments)

I think someone at Digital Trends needs to be given a dictionary, because they clearly don't understand the concept of theft. "Indeed, CarPlay coming to aftermarket stereo units could bring back what Apple indirectly stole from the industry going back as far as 2006."

Apple stole nothing. Apple provided a better solution to consumers that had been basically held over a shit-barrel for years. As Steve Jobs once remarked (about iTunes for Windows users), like giving a glass of ice water to someone in hell. That isn't stealing. At. All.

Further, it appears the idiots in the "consumer electronics" field STILL haven't learned their lesson. At the prices they want, from $500-$700, up to $1400, Apple already makes TWO product lines that substantially undermine their wares: the iPad has more processing power and a nicer screen at a lower price, but an entire Core i5-based Mac mini can also be had for less. Like another reader already asked, I'm surprised that Apple hasn't simply began selling/OEMing a dash dock and bypassed the "auto electronics" companies altogether. Somehow I kinda think is Apple's MotoROKR "shot across the bow"; this is the second chance, if they screw it up Apple will step in and obliterate them. And good riddance.

about 5 months ago
top

EU Should Switch To ODF Standard, Says MEP

ScooterComputer Another missed opportunity by Apple (111 comments)

When Apple embarked on creating the iWork suite, I asked a team member why they didn't target ODF, and instead created a brand new document format from scratch (because the world didn't have enough document formats, I guess). The answer was because ODF didn't give them the flexibility or breadth they required. Now that Apple AGAIN disrupted their users with the latest update of iWork '13, which included removing a substantial number of features to target "cross platform compatibility" (Mac and iOS), I am left wondering...is there anything the current version of ODF could not have provided?

Apple uniquely stood at a nexus to both really put the hurt on Microsoft (by creating a widely used, polished competitor to Office) as well as embrace an open standards process that has been adopted world-wide. They apparently decided to do neither. A missed opportunity. iWork apps can consume ODF (IIRC), but cannot save to the format. So Apple users are once-again left on an island, with their data in formats that history has shown Apple is all too willing to abandon (AppleWorks/ClarisWorks/MacWrite).

about 6 months ago
top

Wal-Mart Sues Visa For $5 Billion For Rigging Card Swipe Fees

ScooterComputer Worst Company in America...regrets (455 comments)

Hrm. I'm glad someone is finally stepping up to confront the assholishness of the credit card processors and their crazy fees. But I just voted for Walmart in the Worst Company in America tourney at http://consumerist.com/tag/wci.... I'm starting to think I should have picked Abercrombie & Finch instead.

about 6 months ago
top

BP Finds Way To Bypass US Crude Export Ban

ScooterComputer Re:Take a lesson from Mr. Vader (247 comments)

I came here to comment, but this was better and more "on target" than anything I was going to blather. Good comment.

about 7 months ago
top

Embedded SIM Design Means No More Swapping Cards

ScooterComputer Re:why? (192 comments)

Carriers will love it too, since they'll once again make the device owner beholden to them for the "magic keys".

about 9 months ago
top

US Treasury Completes Bailout of General Motors

ScooterComputer Re:Is it just me, or ... (425 comments)

Pretty clearly the AC was employing a literary device, "hyperbole".

...grammar is hard.

about 10 months ago
top

Cricket Reactor Inventor Says $1mil Prize Winners Stole His Work

ScooterComputer Re:Philosophy of selfishness = anything goes. (131 comments)

I would posit that this case does NOT reflect a "philosophy of selfishness", but instead a "philosophy of greed". Often the two, selfishness and greed, are conflated. I often read treatises dedicated to trashing Ayn Rand for her promotion of "selfishness", with the writers either cluelessly or maliciously misrepresenting her position. The "philosophy of selfishness" does not entail stealing others' ideas, failing to credit and compensate them; in fact, that is theft, a hallmark of greed, and the very kind of behavior that Rand attributed to the "takers". Selfishness is good, it is what is driving Mr. Dzamba to vociferously defend his work. It is even what is partially driving the Hult team. However, and given McGill's Office of Sponsored Research findings, the Hult team has veered into Greed as it has seemingly decided to take from Mr. Dzamba what it did NOT work to produce. Just as with Reardon metal, this design does not belong to them.
What I find surprising [although with Mr. Clinton's name attached perhaps not so] is that the Hult International Business School would award such a large price ($1M USD) to a project where the central design itself is so seemingly encumbered. One would think that a basic tenet of their Prize would either be outright originalism or profound derivation. Nothing less should be worth $1,000,000.

1 year,1 day
top

Should We Be Afraid of Google Glass?

ScooterComputer Re:balancing the scales (307 comments)

Insightful? You've got to be shitting me. Only to the extent of this current "privacy" stupidity.

Does he gouge out the eyeballs of all his guests and fellow pint-guzzlers, lobotomize them? "Insightful". The label itself is even ironic. HUMANS ARE ENDOWED WITH RECORDING DEVICES, MORONS.

The First Amendment of the Constititution declares the fundamental right to "record" and playback life's "experiences"...the fact that video cameras, tape recorders, photography, tvs, phonographs, etc did not exist in 1789 notwithstanding. The "freedom of the press" had nothing to do with "journalists" or hardware, it has everything to do with your individual right to describe, via available technologies (pen, paper, print, ink, paint, brush), and disseminate those experiences.

I can't wait to read the paranoid blatherings when the idiots realize there are people who exist who enjoy photographic memories...or when they find out there are creative types so skilled with the pen and brush they can accurately describe anything...or OMG those two types would ever end up together! Oh my! (The inability to -think- rationally seems to be the bigger danger, methinks.)

about a year and a half ago
top

Iran Unveils Its Own Stealth Fighter Jet, the Qaher F-313

ScooterComputer I'm not your ordinary, everyday fool... (260 comments)

I did not RTFA, nor do I want to.

But I have an awesome mental picture of this "damn fine" fighter jet...something akin to the Wagon Queen Family Truckster...with wings.

And I don't want to sully that with another 'fake' reality. Really hope it is painted in metallic paint, though.

I know, I know..."wait until ya FLY it!"

about a year and a half ago
top

America's Real Criminal Element: Lead

ScooterComputer The Question not asked (627 comments)

Although this discovery does not explain all violent crime, it seems to indicate something that will need, should need addressed: very likely none of the CRIMINALS during this time voluntarily or willing took lead to induce their psychosis. They were poisoned; by their environment, by society, by ignorance. At the very least, this raises a interesting "mens rea" situation. Certainly, if someone suffered a blackout from fever induced by severe food poisoning while driving home from the restaurant, ran off the road and killed someone, we wouldn't lock them in a cage and call them "animals". However this study is basically saying that very large numbers of people were inadvertently poisoned, made sick, causing neurological damage, and they were then treated to some of the worst, inhumane treatment (prison, electrocution, lethal injection) that any ill human being has ever endured.

So the question is: when is America going to start realizing that prison as a "deep dank hole" is an inhumane basis of punishment rooted more in religious dogma (making people "suffer" for their sins) than in true causality--neurological (and quite inadvertent) defect? Is there any reason for prisons to be such cold, horrific places? Certainly we can look back on the asylums of the early half of the 20th Century with contempt; yet we, societally, accept prison rape and beatings, isolation and estrangement as fodder for comedy. I am no advocate of a plush lifestyle for those convicted of horrific crimes, but neither am I tolerant of such treatment of those who are neurologically incapable of making better, more rational decisions. We need to STOP putting people in prison for stupid crimes (drugs, financial crimes) and confine the use of "corrections" budgets to making safe, healthy places for the sick to live out their lives under proper (medical, if necessary) care.

about a year and a half ago
top

Teen Suicide Tormentor Outed By Anonymous

ScooterComputer Hope he's the right guy (550 comments)

Hope he's the right guy. If not, even if he is a piece of shit otherwise (and all signs point to "Yes!"), he's about to have to endure a shit storm of epic proportion fall upon him. And that would not be fair...

If he is the right guy...I will enjoy watching him self-destruct.

about 2 years ago
top

S. Carolina Supreme Court: Leaving Email In the Cloud Isn't Electronic Storage

ScooterComputer Re:Courts cannot fix faulty statutes (112 comments)

The job of judges -IS-, absolutely, to apply the intent of applicable statue to the changing of the times. Clearly, the statute was intended to secure communication while in transit and where it is stored AFTER the traditionally defined (in wiretap terms) concept of "delivery"it was admittedly written in a time where the download and RE-upload of communication for "backup protection" was commonplace. However, technology has shifted; there is no longer the need to download and re-upload, what GETS downloaded is the "transient", temporary state. In wiretap parlance, once a communique is delivered, it is the responsibility of the addressee to henceforth protect it. (Same concept with a physical letter!) In traditional email systems, wiretap would not apply if the Wife had sneakily dug into the MBOX or PST files on the guys computer (because he was responsible for securing those files). But current technology performs both the "backup protection" storage AND viewer task simultaneously; the need for the addressee to take physical possession of the communique is negated.

These judges muffed it. Clearly, anyone who uses and relies upon web-based (transient) interaction for email purposes is EXPLICITLY relying on the storage of that communication for purposes of backup protection. Otherwise, the providers of the service would just throw it away and save the bits, or never provide a Trash.

Also, wat gets labeled "judicial activism" is when Judges creatively use legislation to either bolster or deny behavior in tangential and non-intentional ways. Like applying DUI laws to bicycles. Clearly, when the 'D' in DUI stands for "DRIVING", and the code is enforced under MOTOR VEHICLE CODE, being a drunk moron on a bike shouldn't come under that statute.

about 2 years ago
top

Why Juries Have No Place In the Patent System

ScooterComputer "expert tribunal" (387 comments)

Screw "expert tribunal", fight to the death! Each side puts up 12 contenders (to tie it to the jury system), twelve "angry" men (or women, whichever). Then, fight it out Kirk & Spock style, ala koon-ut-kal-if-fee in 'Amok Time'. Damages are based on the number of surviving "jurors".

Because otherwise, the "experts" will just get bought off like every other "regulatory" body in the US and it won't be any fun for anyone. I'd be OK if at least one of the jurors was a VP or higher.

more than 2 years ago
top

AT&T Defends Controversial FaceTime Policy Following Widespread Backlash

ScooterComputer That is a "defense"? (220 comments)

That "defense" seems to be worse than the Dallas Cowboys Defense of last year (excepting DeMarcus Ware...he's the MAN!). So AT&T -ADMITS- they're blocking capriciously and discriminatively, but then says "We're doing nothing wrong."?

I'm not sure what violating net neutrality looks like then, in these guys' minds. So Comcast can block Hulu, that's just fine, but only allow it for their Triple Play customers, since they're trying to reduce congestion???

BZZZZZZT! Wrong answer, jerk.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

ScooterComputer hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

ScooterComputer has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?