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Comments

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Red Hat Acquires InkTank, Ceph Maintainers

ScuttleMonkey Re:How do you back up Ceph? (18 comments)

(Inktank community guy here)

There are a number of different options for backup/disaster recovery solutions with Ceph, depending on what piece(s) of the platform you are using. For instance, the object gateways (think S3) from multiple clusters can be plugged together for multi-site replication. The CephFS and block device portions both have snapshotting built in that can be replicated offsite.

In the medium-term we're looking at having a way to replicate your entire cluster over the wire at the RADOS level (underlying object store). Longer-term we'd love to be able to offer WAN-scale replication for a single cluster and the ability to snapshot a cluster (or portions/pools therein) easily.

I hope that helps. If you have more questions hit me up on #ceph at OFTC.net IRC.

about 4 months ago
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Does OpenStack Need a Linus Torvalds?

ScuttleMonkey Re:What it needs is some beef (152 comments)

As one AC already pointed out, you should check out Ceph (full disclaimer: I work for Inktank now, the consulting services company that employs most of the core Ceph devs). Ceph is, at its heart a Distributed Object store, but we allow you to access in a number of different ways:

  • * Native API
  • * Via a RESTful interface that can handle native Amazon S3 and Swift API calls
  • * As a thinly provisioned block device
  • * Mount it as a POSIX-compliant file system via CephFS (although this is a bit rough for production environments just yet)

Josh Durgin has actually done some really interesting work in using the block device (RBD) to back Cinder which you can read a bit about here.

The cool part about Ceph is it was designed to be massively scalable (petabytes and beyond) and extremely fault tolerant / HA / etc. DreamHost actually just built out a huge production deployment of Ceph and OpenStack for their new DreamCompute / DreamObjects offering. If you have questions feel free to hit up the #Ceph irc channel at irc.oftc.net or poke me via email (my UN at inktank.com) and I'll see if I can't find the right person to help.

OpenStack really has some awesome potential, and we're excited about poking at it more with our semi-sharp Ceph-stick. Good luck.

about 2 years ago
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Could Anti-Texting Laws Make Roads More Dangerous?

ScuttleMonkey Re:Do nothing (709 comments)

While I agree the gene pool could use a bit more chlorine...what happens when one of these undesirables happens to jump the curb and take out a Stephen Hawking, Albert Einstein, etc? It's not just the individual hurting themselves which is what drives the lawmakers to action. Personally I'm all for on-the-spot executions for any infraction, just watch out for the white fences. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0708739/

more than 3 years ago
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Problem at Slashdot.org

ScuttleMonkey anonymous submissions? (1 comments)

You do realize we have been accepting anonymous submissions for years, right?

more than 4 years ago
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EA Comes Under Fire for Shady PR Stunts

ScuttleMonkey Re:I guess it was money well spent (228 comments)

assuming ScuttleMonkey wasn't a recipient of one of the $200 checks.

I certainly plan on lodging a formal complaint. Where is my $200 EA?

more than 4 years ago
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Career Change: Help Desk

ScuttleMonkey Stay off the phones! (1 comments)

Dear god, avoid phone support roles like the plague...keep your "cushy" IT job no matter how much you might hate it. Internal or controlled user populations are almost _always_ better than having to deal with external users.

more than 5 years ago
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Ask Jazz Technical Lead Dr. Erich Gamma

ScuttleMonkey Re:Patterns (83 comments)

I asked for a quick writeup and just kept it to what the communications person chose to include. Feel free to fire away on whatever topics you know him to be knowledgeable on.

more than 5 years ago
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Issues with Javascript

ScuttleMonkey No JS Restrictions I'm Aware Of (2 comments)

I haven't heard anything about JS restrictions, do you have documentation on this somewhere? When I visit hhs.gov (or google for "javascript site:.gov") the only things I see about javascript is how it should be turned on to best view the pages. In order for us to offer the advanced tools and technology as the web evolves javascript becomes a necessary tool (see http://slashdot.org/faq/UI.shtml#ui700 ). If you would really like a stripped down page you can log in, select the preferences icon in the upper right and choose either "small screen" or "low bandwidth" mode, both offer very minimal viewing experiences and most anything can function without javascript with graceful failover, just don't expect the fancy functionality.

more than 5 years ago
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Best Easter Eggs and Other Software Surprises

ScuttleMonkey Re:*sigh* (233 comments)

Yep, typo is fixed now. Congrats, hold yer geek card high today. :)

more than 5 years ago
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Slashdot Launches User Achievements

ScuttleMonkey Re:Unexplained Achievement "The Maker"? (1582 comments)

This is remarkably close...but I wont spoil the joy of discovery. :P

As the achievement system grows some of the more difficult achievements will even result in special rewards. Good luck.

more than 5 years ago
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Slashdot Keybindings, Dynamic Stories

ScuttleMonkey Re:Slashdot looks weird (220 comments)

Without being able to put too fine a point on it look for many of the accessibility changes to slowly roll out over the next couple of months. There is a high degree of priority shuffling right now as we fence w/ the corporate overlords about what defines "important". :)

more than 5 years ago
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Slashdot Keybindings, Dynamic Stories

ScuttleMonkey Re:Slashdot looks weird (220 comments)

well, then among the many "cool" updates on the way you will appreciate the work that is currently being expended to make low-bandwidth, small screen, iphone, etc, interfaces much less buggy and faster-loading. :)

more than 5 years ago
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Slashdot Keybindings, Dynamic Stories

ScuttleMonkey Re:Slashdot looks weird (220 comments)

Yes, it has been a painful migration. However, a complete rewrite of the FAQ is coming soon (with context-appropriate linkage from the rest of the site) along with a much more intuitive interface that allows for easier firehose use. You have already seen the very tip of the iceberg with this post by Rob, expect to many more things like this making the site easier to decode.

I know it hasn't been easy, but hang in there. Slashteam has some really cool stuff on the way.

more than 5 years ago
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Slashdot Keybindings, Dynamic Stories

ScuttleMonkey Re:Slashdot looks weird (220 comments)

The story tag is to distinguish stories from submissions and comments.

Among other datatypes. The firehose is our content delivery tool and pretty much any page is just becoming a filter on the firehose to display whatever data you are asking for. This allows us to do a lot of really cool things (both now and in the near future) and get some performance hits back soon.

more than 5 years ago
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NVIDIA Countersues Intel Over License Conflict

ScuttleMonkey Re:The real source of this post is here... (132 comments)

By "real source" Mojo is of course referring to the fact that this submission was originally authored by him and submitted with the link to his own site, a link everyone can still see in the "related articles" which shows his original submission via the firehose. We aren't hiding the fact that we changed it, there was just a better link to be had. The unfortunate part of all this is a submission to Slashdot is merely a "heads up", we are not licensing your content, we are not purchasing an article. Ultimately our editors are going to choose both the summary text and offsite links that are best suited to represent the story for discussion by the community.

Now, this is not to say we don't value any submissions. We recognize that a certain amount of the driving force behind sharing a story is to get your own vanity link as recognition (although we do slap a big fat "nofollow" on there so no google-juice farming for you) so your name is linked to whatever you put in the "your site" field. In this case Mojo chose to link the top level domain of his site "http://hothardware.com/" which is linked to off his name. The "scoop", however, is what is most important to our readers and as an editor I feel the obligation to provide the absolute best possible content when available. In this case kdawson felt that article Mojo linked to was not as good as the Reuters piece. It happens a lot, get used to it. If a link or the summary text is not up to snuff we often rewrite/replace it for the good of the site.

Bottom line is you are submitting this story as a participatory member of a community, a community that is heavily in favor of ideals like open source and the freedom/sharing of information. While we value your contribution, I will always choose the site with better information and fewer ads when possible so that our readers have less drek to wade through to get to the meat. I mean honestly, few readers actually read the article before spouting off at the mouth as it is, I don't want to force that behavior with sub-optimal articles.

Sorry you feel you got burned, but a sense of entitlement in a community based on collaboration is something I just can't support. Hope to see you around in the future.

more than 5 years ago
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I Count In

ScuttleMonkey Re:Only 10 types of people. (599 comments)

Actually there are three types of people in this world, those who can count and those who cannot.

more than 5 years ago
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Contact Ask Slashdot Submitter

ScuttleMonkey Posted anonymously (1 comments)

The question was submitted anonymously, I would suggest participating in the discussion on that story for best results.

more than 5 years ago
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Java, Where to Start?

ScuttleMonkey Re:I beg to disagree (558 comments)

Frankly I'm a little tired (although not surprised) of the constant "omg just google it...I know lots about this subject so it is clearly not worth discussing" that seems to appear on the ask slashdots. I'll refrain from a tiresome rant that I'm sure we all can visualize without actually having to write it down.

However, wrt to this particular question, if you look closely he wasn't asking "how do I learn Java" or "where can I find info about Java", he was asking for those with experience to help direct his path of learning. It is precisely the abundance of Google results that probably prompted this question.

I know that on broad topics I am often frustrated by the abundance of crap that I have to wade through in order to get to the few gems that are worth reading. When it comes to long-winded textbooks and weeks-long learning processes I would be more than happy to allow someone with years of experience to direct me to the optimal path of learning (why going to school still makes at least a little sense).

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Intel and Micron Unveil 128Gb 20nm NAND Flash

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "A joint venture between Intel and Micron has given rise to a new 128Gb die. While production wont start until next year and distribution mostly likely not until 2013, this little beauty sets new bars for capacity, speed, and endurance. "Die shrinks also tend to reduce endurance, with old 65 m MLC flash being rated at 5,000-10,000 erase cycles, but that number dropping to 3,000-5,000 for 25nm MLC flash. However, IMFT is claiming that the shrink to 20nm has not caused any corresponding reduction in endurance. Its 20nm flash uses a Hi-K/metal gate design which allows it to make transistors that are smaller but no less robust. IMFT is claiming that this use of Hi-K/metal gate is a first for NAND flash production.""
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Mainstream Media Looks at Anonymous

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 3 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "In an uncharacteristically accurate writeup of Anonymous, the Guardian has published a look at the assembled mob behind the mask. A great place to send those unfamiliar with who or what Anonymous really is. 'This collective identity belongs to no one in particular, but is at the disposal of anyone who knows its rules and knows how to apply them. Anonymous, the collective identity, is older than Anonymous, the hacktvist group – more to the point, I propose that the hacktivist group can be understood as an application of Anonymous, the collective identity.'"
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Startups a Safer Bet Than Behemoths

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  about 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "TechCrunch's Vivek Wadhwa has a great article that takes a look at difference between startups and "established" tech companies and what they each mean to the economy and innovation in general. Wadhwa examines statistics surrounding job creation and innovation and while big companies may acquire startups and prove out the business model, the risk and true innovations seems to be living at the startup level almost exclusively. 'Now let’s talk about innovation. Apple is the poster child for tech innovation; it releases one groundbreaking product after another. But let’s get beyond Apple. I challenge you to name another tech company that innovates like Apple—with game-changing technologies like the iPod, iTunes, iPhone, and iPad. Google certainly doesn’t fit the bill—after its original search engine and ad platform, it hasn’t invented anything earth shattering. Yes, Google did develop a nice email system and some mapping software, but these were incremental innovations. For that matter, what earth-shattering products have IBM, HP, Microsoft, Oracle, or Cisco produced in recent times? These companies constantly acquire startups and take advantage of their own size and distribution channels to scale up the innovations they have purchased.'"
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Microsoft sends flowers to Internet Explorer 6 fun

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "In Seattle, IE6 was a trending topic on Twitter thanks to a CNN story on Aten Design Group's funeral for Internet Explorer 6. The tongue-in-cheek memorial is happening this evening in Denver."
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Tracking Water Molecule Could Unlock Secrets

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "ScienceDaily is reporting that several new discoveries about the simple molecule of water have kicked off a surge in research that scientists believe could lead to solving some of the world's most tricky problems from agriculture to cancer. "Understanding how individual water molecules maneuver in a system to form fleeting tetrahedral structures and how changing physical conditions such as temperatures and pressures affect the amount of disorder each imparts on that system may help scientists understand why certain substances, like drugs used in chemotherapy, are soluble in water and why some are not. It could also help understand how this changing network of bonds and ordering of local tetrahedrality between water molecules changes the nature of protein folding and degradation. 'Understanding hydrophobicity, and how different conditions change it, is probably one of the most fundamental components in understanding how proteins fold in water and how different biomolecules remain stable in it,' says Kumar. 'And if we understand this, we will not only have a new way of thinking about physics and biology but also a new way to approach health and disease.'""
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How an Android Phone and Facebook Helped Haiti

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "One intrepid Android fan is extolling the virtues of the open smartphone platform that recently helped him to route SOS messages in the recent Haiti disaster where there was limited cell phone service. "Well, when you are in such a situation, you don’t really think about going to Facebook, but it happens that I have a Facebook widget on my Android home screen that regularly displays status updates from my friends. All of a sudden, an SOS message appeared on my home screen as a status update of a friend on my network. Not all smartphones allow you to customize your home screen, let alone letting you put widgets on it. So, I texted Steven about it. As Steven had already been working with the U.S. State Department on Internet development activities in Haiti, he quickly called a senior staff member at the State Department and asked how to get help to the people requesting it from Haiti. State Department personnel requested a short description and a physical street address or GPS coordinates. Via email and text messaging, I was able to relay this information from Port-au-Prince to Steven in Oregon, who relayed it to the State Department in Washington DC, and it was quickly forwarded to the U.S. military at the Port-au-Prince airport and dispatched to the search-and-rescue (SAR) teams being assembled. So the data went from my Android phone to Oregon to Washington DC and then back to the U.S. military command center at the Port-au-Prince airport. I was at first a little skeptical about their reaction: there was so much destruction; they probably already had their hands full. Unexpectedly, they replied back saying: 'We found them, and they are alive! Keep it coming.'""
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Verizon CTO says 4G service is on track | 3GSM blo

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "Verizon has announced that it is on track to roll out their new 4G LTE service using the 700 MHz band that it acquired in the recent FCC auction. Targeted first towards USB air cards for laptop customers, the service will be extended to cell phones and other mobile devices with embedded LTE towards eventually. Testing in Boston and Seattle should conclude in the next couple of months and commercial deployments should follow soon thereafter. "Lynch said getting voice to work over LTE has been particularly challenging. But that challenge is getting resolved as Verizon and other members of the GSMA announced Monday they are supporting a standard that uses IMS technology to deliver voice services over LTE. Still, more work needs to be done. Until a solution is complete, Verizon will use its CDMA network to provide voice services. And the LTE network will be used for data. Eventually, when voice over LTE becomes a reality, Verizon will use that technology. Verizon will also have to integrate EV-DO into its LTE offering to ensure that customers can switch to the 3G EV-DO network when the 4G LTE network is not available. Even though Verizon is being aggressive in building its network, it won't happen overnight.""
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Steampunk Con Mixes in More Maker Fun

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "California has once again been blessed with another steampunk convention, this time to be held in Emeryville, CA as the "Nova Albion Steampunk Exhibition." This year's event promises to mix in much more of the DIY/maker flavor for a greater hands-on feel. Steampunk has been gaining much broader appeal in recent months with the continued growth of maker communities, and the many delightful varieties of music and literature. The con will feature, among other things, a 2 day track of 2-hour how-to, hands-on, and interactive workshops gear towards makers, DIY-ers, mad scientists, and evil geniuses. Of course, if you are an evil genius you probably don't need a workshop except as a gathering for potential test subjects."
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A Look Under Western Digital's Hood

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "Tom's Hardware got a rare opportunity to explore the Western Digital campus and show us what goes on under the hood of one of the favorites in storage tech. "When you buy a car, you look under the hood. Given the critical importance of hard disk storage in all of our lives, we thought you might want a peek under that hood, too. Now that Western Digital is in the business of breaking new capacity records (the latest Caviar Green was the first drive to hit 2TB, for example), we jumped at the chance to take a first-ever, unrestricted tour of its California R&D facilities. This is the place where magnetic technology of the 1950s meets the nano- and quantum-level technologies of the current decade.""
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What are the Best Valentine's Day Stunts?

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "With the oh-so-dreaded Hallmark holiday on the very near horizon we are flooded with tips and tricks (mostly designed to sell us things our mates cannot live without) of how to please/capture/sedate the ones we care for. One writer even suggests way to capture the interest of a geeky girl. That said, what are some of the crazier romantically inspired, geeky V-day stunts or activities that you or someone you know has executed to terrible success or failure?"
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SourceForge Removes Blanket Blocking

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "Recently there was much gnashing of teeth as SourceForge started programmatically blocking users in certain countries to comply with US export restrictions. Thankfully they didn't let it end there and have found a way to put the power back in the hands of the users. "Beginning now, every project admin can click on Develop -> Project Admin -> Project Settings to find a new section called Export Control. By default, we’ve ticked the more restrictive setting. If you conclude that your project is *not* subject to export regulations, or any other related prohibitions, you may now tick the other check mark and click Update. After that, all users will be able to download your project files as they did before last month’s change.""
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"Calvin and Hobbes" Creator Bill Watterson Looks

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "With fifteen years separating us from the last appearance of "Calvin and Hobbes" on the comic pages, reclusive artist Bill Watterson gave a rare interview reminiscing about his legacy. "The only part I understand is what went into the creation of the strip. What readers take away from it is up to them. Once the strip is published, readers bring their own experiences to it, and the work takes on a life of its own. Everyone responds differently to different parts. I just tried to write honestly, and I tried to make this little world fun to look at, so people would take the time to read it. That was the full extent of my concern. You mix a bunch of ingredients, and once in a great while, chemistry happens. I can't explain why the strip caught on the way it did, and I don't think I could ever duplicate it. A lot of things have to go right all at once.""
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Bleep Labs Brings You Arduino-based Nebulophone

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "Bleep Labs, the same people who brought you the Thingamagoop (and now Thingamagoop2!), have released a new fun gadget — the Arduino-based Nebulophone. "What do you get when you mash together an Arduino-based synth with a Stylophone-like keyboard? A month ago, even we wouldn't have known, but now that Handmade Music Austin has come and gone, we're happy to say that this beautiful concoction leads to the creation of a Nebulophone. Unfortunately, there's no video (yet) to showcase what this musical wonder can do, but we're told that it has 'adjustable waveforms, a light controlled analog filter, LFO and an arpeggiator that can be clocked over IR.'""
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SourceForge Clarifies Denial of Site Access

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "Recently there were some complaints from certain users outside the U.S. stating that they were no longer able to access SourceForge.net. SF.net (who shares a corporate overlord with Slashdot) has outlined the reasons for these bans and until someone with sufficient power to alter U.S. law or the lists governing who is allowed to access what data from where, there is unlikely to be a change in these bans. It is worth noting that SF.net is not alone in these difficulties as the same problems have been reported from other repositories like Google Code. "As one of the first companies to promote the adoption and distribution of free and open source software, and one that still puts open source at the center of its corporate ideals, restrictions on the free flow of information rub us the wrong way. However, in addition to participating in the open source community, we also live in the real world, and are governed by the laws of the country in which we are located. Our need to follow those laws supersedes any wishes we might have to make our community as inclusive as possible. The possible penalties for violating these restrictions include fines and imprisonment. Other hosting companies based in the US have similar legal and technical restrictions in place.""
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Researchers Claim "Effectively Perfect" Spam Block

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "A team of computer scientists from the International Computer Science Institute in Berkeley, CA are claiming to have found an "effectively perfect" method for blocking spam. The new system deciphers the templates a botnet is using to create spam and then teachers filters what to look for. "The system [] works by exploiting a trick that spammers use to defeat email filters. As spam is churned out, subtle changes are typically incorporated into the messages to confound spam filters. Each message is generated from a template that specifies the message content and how it should be varied. The team reasoned that analysing such messages could reveal the template that created them. And since the spam template describes the entire range of the emails a bot will send, possessing it might provide a watertight method of blocking spam from that bot.""
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Mozilla Tries New "Lorentz" Dev Model

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "With the recent release of Firefox 3.6, Mozilla has also decided to try out a new development model dubbed "Lorentz." A blend of both Agile and more traditional "waterfall" development models, the new methodology aims to deliver new features much more quickly while still maintaining backwards compatibility, security, and overall quality. Only time will tell if this is effective, or just another management fad. "If the new approach sounds familiar, that's because Unix and Linux development has attempted similar kinds of release variations for iterating new features while maintaining backwards compatibility. HP-UX, for example, is currently on its HP-UX 11iv3 release, which receives updates several times a year that add incremental new functionality. The Linux 2.6.x kernel gets new releases approximately every three months, which include new features as well.""
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15 Year Old Student Discovers New Pulsar

ScuttleMonkey ScuttleMonkey writes  |  more than 4 years ago

ScuttleMonkey writes "For the second time in as many years a student has made a discovery while participating in the Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC), a joint program between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory and West Virginia University designed to get students and teachers involved in analyzing data from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This time it was high school sophomore Shay Bloxton who discovered a brand new pulsar. "For Bloxton, the pulsar discovery may be only her first in a scientific career. "Participating in the PSC has definitely encouraged me to pursue my dream of being an astrophysicist," she said, adding that she hopes to attend West Virginia University to study astrophysics. Late last year, another West Virginia student, from South Harrison High School, Lucas Bolyard, discovered a pulsar-like object called a rotating radio transient. His discovery also came through participation in the PSC.""
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