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500-fold Increase in Data Flow from SETI Telescope

SeaDour Re:Seti Growth explosion yet to come (346 comments)

From what I've read in the setiathome forums, the SETI Institute/Allen Array has no plans to utilize setiathome software for data analysis. Setiathome will remain strictly a Project Phoenix (Arecibo-based) project. It's important to note that there is no one single "SETI" organization that controls all ET research. Project Phoenix at Berkeley is one, SETI Institute is another, the optical SETI project at Harvard is a third...there are multitudes.

more than 6 years ago

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Hubble Spots Widespread Changes on Jupiter

SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  about 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "Recent images of Jupiter from the Hubble Space Telescope taken a little over two months apart are showing dramatic changes in the gas giant's overall appearance. 'Between March 25 and June 5, Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 captured entire bands of clouds changing color. Zones have darkened into belts and belts have lightened and transformed into zones. Cloud features have rapidly altered in shape and size.' These large-scale shifts in Jupiter's atmosphere have been noticed before in the 1980s and 90s, but never with such fine resolution. Astronomers do not yet have a solid explanation for the phenomenon."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "Earlier it was reported that the cremated remains of Jimmy Doohan (aka "Scotty") and Mercury astronaut Gordon Cooper were successfully launched along with the remains of 198 other individuals on a suborbital rocket from Spaceport America in New Mexico. The rocket was tracked by the nearby White Sands Missile Range, but it seems that they have been unable to find it since it landed in the nearby mountains. "...the general location of the rocket hardware is known within some 1,300 feet (400 meters) or so. But given the dense vegetation on the side of the mountain being searched, along with equipment available to the search team, pinpointing the exact locale has proven a tough assignment.""
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "The famous Deep Impact mission, which in 2005 launched a projectile in the path of comet Tempel 1, may be extended by NASA. The proposal is to slingshot the probe around the Earth as it passes by at the end of this year, putting it on a trajectory to reach comet Boethin in December 2008. Scientists want to see if the strange composition and behavior of Tempel 1 is more common than they had previously assumed. (The probe only had one projectile though, so we will not see another brilliant man-made explosion on this comet.) Additionally, while the probe is en route to the comet, researchers will point its on-board telescope at known exosolar planets to determine the compositions of their atmospheres."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "A NASA study is claiming that one of the major reasons last year's hurricane season was so tame compared to the initial forecasts may have been due to increased dust storm activity in Africa's Sahara Desert. The dust particles drifted over the Atlantic, blocking sunlight to the water below which allowed it to cool significantly. "Dust concentrations may play as big a role as other atmospheric conditions, like El Nino, and offer some predictive value, so they should be closely monitored to improve hurricane forecasts," said lead author William Lau."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "Physicians around the globe have been using detailed three-dimensional images to look deep inside the human body for years. Now, astrophysicists are using the same visualization technology to peer through the cosmos. "Harvard's Initiative for Innovative Computing (IIC) has brought together astronomers, medical imaging specialists, and software engineers to adapt medical imaging software to create 3-D views of astronomical bodies." The project, known as AstroMed, allows scientists to analyze detailed information on the underlying structure of various large-scale deep space phenomena, all generated on a typical home computer. "Right now, this software is a tool for scientists. We are blazing a trail in the field of 3-D astronomical computer graphics," explained Michael Halle, AstroMed Project Manager. "As we refine our capabilities, we hope to develop a tool that researchers in a variety of fields reliant on 3-D data will use on everyday computers.""
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "Spaceport America, being built north of Las Cruces, New Mexico, is finally becoming a reality and is set to become the world's first commercial spaceport. Governor Bill Richardson recently secured 33 million dollars from the state legislature for the final design, and a proposed 0.25% sales tax increase in Dona Ana County, where the facility is to be constructed, is expected to bring an additional 6.5 million dollars per year (if approved by voters next week). Richard Branson, the head of upstart Virgin Galactic, on Monday agreed to lease the facility for 27.5 million dollars over twenty years. If all continues to go as planned, SpaceShipTwo will make its first suborbital joy ride in two to three years."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "NASA's Cassini space probe made headlines last fall when it spotted a massive hurricane-like storm at the planet's south pole. Now, through a series of thermal images, scientists have confirmed the continued presence of a bizzare hexagon-shaped vortex around the north pole which was first glimpsed by the Voyager probes. "This is a very strange feature, lying in a precise geometric fashion with six nearly equally straight sides," said Kevin Baines, member of Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer team. "We've never seen anything like this on any other planet." The feature is big enough to hold nearly four Earths, making it significantly larger than Jupiter's famous Great Red Spot."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are taking a closer look at images sent back by the Mars rover Spirit nearly a year ago, showing bright yellow soil that had been churned up by the rover's wheels. The soil appears to contain high concentrations of sulfur as well as traces of water. "This material could have been left behind by water that dissolved these minerals underground, then came to the surface and evaporated, or it could be a volcanic deposit formed around ancient gas vents," said Dr. Ray Arvidson. Researchers are planning to see if the soil turns up anywhere else in the area, potentially giving more clues as to its origin."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "Science-fiction author Orson Scott Card takes a critical (and rather lengthy) look at a report distributed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a UN agency. Nearly everyone heard about that on the news back in 1999 — the "hockey stick" report that appeared to show the Earth is in its warmest period over the last 1,000 years. Through some detective work, a researcher found the original FORTRAN program which crunched the numbers and discovered that the report used falsified data sets, adding more doubt to the already highly controversial findings. In fact, punching random numbers into the program "magically" produced the same exact graph every time. It seems the company that produced the report had a final result in mind when they began calculating their equations, and did whatever they possibly could to get that result even if the actual data never lined up. Is fair science even possible when the governments and organizations that give researchers their grants demand certain results that line up with their opinions?"
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "The Pluto-bound New Horizons space probe, launched a little over a year ago, recently succeeded in passing through a narrow navigational keyhole by Jupiter. Using the gas giant's tremendous gravity, the craft now has a significant boost toward its final destination, shaving three years off its journey. As it passed through the Jovian system, the probe took some fantastic images of the neighborhood, including detailed observations of erupting volcanoes on Io, time-lapse photography of Jupiter's tumultuous atmosphere, and even the faint ring system that was first discovered in Voyager photography. These new images prove the tremendous capabilities of the small probe, which is set to reach Pluto in 2015."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour (704727) writes "The Cassini spacecraft has recently entered a highly-inclined orbit around Saturn, revealing some never-before-seen images of the planet's ring system as seen from above and below the planet. "Finally, here are the views that we've waited years for," said Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team leader at the Space Science Institute. "Sailing high above Saturn and seeing the rings spread out beneath us like a giant, copper medallion is like exploring an alien world we've never seen before. It just doesn't look like the same place. It's so utterly breath-taking, it almost gives you vertigo." The spacecraft will eventually return to its standard orbit parallel to the ring plane in late June."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour (704727) writes "This Saturday night, March 3rd, a total lunar eclipse will be visible from nearly all inhabited parts of the world. A great shadow will stretch across the surface of the moon, eventually casting it in an eerie red glow as sunlight filters through our atmosphere onto the lunar surface. Viewers in Europe and Africa will have the best vantage point, able to watch the entire eclipse in action, while observers in most of the western hemisphere can see it eclipsed as it rises just after sunset."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour (704727) writes "A music critic for Gramophone, a classical music magazine, has discovered that the recent works of Joyce Hatto, a famed British pianist who passed away last year, are nothing more than blatant copies of other performances. What makes this story interesting is that he found this out when iTunes, and therefore the Gracenote music database, "misidentified" the CD. "He put the disc into his computer to listen, and something awfully strange happened. His computer's player identified the disc as ... not a Hatto recording. Instead, his display suggested that the disc was one on BIS Records, by the pianist Lászlo Simon. Mystified, our critic checked his Hatto disc against the actual Simon recording, and to his amazement they sounded exactly the same." Sound wave analysis is now being done to determine just how many of Hatto's recordings are indeed rip-offs."
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SeaDour SeaDour writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SeaDour writes "China has claimed to have carried out a successful test on its experimental thermonuclear fusion reactor. But what exactly made this test 'successful' remains to be speculated. 'Xinhua cited the scientists as saying that deuterium and tritium atoms had been fused together at a temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius for nearly three seconds. The report did not specify whether the device...had succeeded at producing more energy than it consumed, the main obstacle to making fusion commercially viable.'"

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