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Feds Return Mistakenly Seized Domain

SeekerDarksteel Re:How nice of them (243 comments)

Again, they may have been wrong in this case about copyright being infringed, but they do have that power.

They do NOT have the power to seize property or restrict speech without proving that it is justified. Even if you argue that a domain is not 'property', they interfered with the domain owner's ability to disseminate information without cause.

about 3 years ago
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Bloggers Not Journalists, Federal Judge Rules

SeekerDarksteel Re:If not the government, then who? (353 comments)

How about we don't have special rights for special people? Everyone gets the same rights regardless of whether or not the government or someone else feels like a particular class of people shouldn't have them.

about 3 years ago
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New Batch of Leaked Climate Emails

SeekerDarksteel Re:Climate change ceased to be a scientific issue (585 comments)

The only people that think that the last batch of emails demonstrated any kind of fraud are people who have no fucking clue what the fuck the emails actually said.

But don't let little things like facts and observable reality get in the way of your diatribe of made up facts and fabrications.

more than 2 years ago
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Hackers Eavesdrop On Quantum Crypto With Lasers

SeekerDarksteel Re:Article Makes No Sense (161 comments)

Ah, ok. That's making a lot more sense. It really didn't come across in the Nature article that way to me. But I guess that's scientific reporting for ya, :P

more than 4 years ago
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Hackers Eavesdrop On Quantum Crypto With Lasers

SeekerDarksteel Re:Article Makes No Sense (161 comments)

Ok, I must be missing how exactly you're controlling Bob's basis then. I guess that's what your blinding trick is supposed to be doing, but my physics is too weak to understand why. (I studied QC from a computer engineer standpoint, not a physics standpoint). My impression from the Nature article was that you could force Bob to see a 0 or a 1. If that's all you could do, then Eve's interference would have been detectable since she would have passed on bad bits when Alice and Bob's bases agreed but Eve's didn't.

more than 4 years ago
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Hackers Eavesdrop On Quantum Crypto With Lasers

SeekerDarksteel Article Makes No Sense (161 comments)

The article is either missing massive details or these researchers are vastly overstating the power of their technique. The entire _point_ of quantum key exchange is that if Eve intercepts the signal she cannot tell if she read a 0 or a 1 because she does not know which basis the 0 or 1 was generated in. Even IF Eve passed a 1 along every time she read a 1, when Alice and Bob go to do the basis comparison over the standard channel they will notice errors because Eve read the signal in the wrong basis and passed along an incorrect value.

I've tried reading the actual journal paper, but unfortunately they just seem to handwave this problem away. Maybe there's a reason they can, but its sure as hell not explained as far as I can see unless they're assuming Eve has also compromised the classical channel as well as the quantum channel.

more than 4 years ago
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Do Car Safety Problems Come From Outer Space?

SeekerDarksteel Re:Sun UltraSPARC-II's anyone? (437 comments)

They do. This is a known phenomenon which has been measured. But the difference between, say, Denver and NYC isn't substantial enough that you would notice a difference with your personal electronics.

more than 4 years ago
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Do Car Safety Problems Come From Outer Space?

SeekerDarksteel Re:Long Answer: No (437 comments)

Yes. Yes they do receive more radiation at higher altitudes. This is a known, measurable effect. That being said, the difference between sea level and ~5000 feet is not substantial enough that you would notice with personal electronics.

more than 4 years ago
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Do Car Safety Problems Come From Outer Space?

SeekerDarksteel Re:Checksums? (437 comments)

Insulating the ROM would be much more expensive than just adding error correcting codes or having multiple copies of the ROM and comparing the contents periodically. The problem is no matter what you do, it's going to add cost and complexity, so unless you can show that single event upsets are indeed causing a problem there's no reason to prevent them.

more than 4 years ago
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Do Car Safety Problems Come From Outer Space?

SeekerDarksteel Re:No. (437 comments)

There's a reason that our entire modern world doesn't come crashing to a halt around us every 30 seconds. If every CPU was vulnerable to bit flips from random radiation, every part of your house would be on fire and arcing electricity. Times Square would look like the bridge of the 60s enterprise under attack.

Actually, every CPU _IS_ vulnerable to bit-flips from radiation. That part of it is not speculation. It does occur in commodity processors, and with probabilities large enough that we have ECC ram, and ECC and/or parity in caches. Some servers actually come with built in hardware fault tolerance methods, because when you run hundreds of servers non-stop for years, the probability that a particle strike screws up a register on chip is non-negligible. Now, still, the probability isn't _huge_. Definitely not high enough to be causing these specific problems, especially when the failure is always in the same manner. _That_ part of it is pretty much bullshit.

more than 4 years ago
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Do Car Safety Problems Come From Outer Space?

SeekerDarksteel Re:Why they tell you to turn off your phone... (437 comments)

This is one of the most common methods of error tolerance, actually, N-modular redundancy (typically either dual-modular or triple-modular). It's used in airliners and space shuttles, as well as a number of other critical applications. IBM actually sells servers (the system z series) which automatically runs two copies of everything and compares instruction results, so that failing processors can be detected and avoided.

The proposal by the GP poster is actually much more difficult that it would seem at first glance. About the only place "checksum" style error detection is used is in memories/registers. The reason is that if I do a floating point addition, for example, the only way I know whether the addition gave me the right answer is to do the addition again and check.

more than 4 years ago
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Code-Breaking Quantum Algorithm On a Silicon Chip

SeekerDarksteel Re:Is there any safe encryption? (133 comments)

Any private-key encryption, of which OTPs are an example, don't have much to worry about from quantum computing at this time. The problem is that private-key exchange is hard to do between two entities who are unknown to each other.

more than 5 years ago
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Time Denies Issuing DMCA Over Obama Joker Image

SeekerDarksteel Re:Time issued the takedown notice (324 comments)

Flickr: DC stole the cookie from the cookie jar issued the takedown notice *Flickr has been kicked by DC(fuck you, i didn't touch the mother fucking cookie, bitch)

more than 5 years ago
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Several Quantum Calculations Combined At NIST

SeekerDarksteel Re:This may be slightly off-topic, but (91 comments)

Wow, a decent summary of quantum computing on the internet. It's so weird not having to pull out the baseball bat and perform some facial readjustment in a qc thread. Just a little added information. When we refer to qubits as being "both" 0 and 1 at the same time, it's not necessarily a 50/50 split. It is in the form (a+bi)|0> + (c + di)|1>, where |0> refers to the 0 state and |1> to the 1 state. |a+bi| = sqrt(a*a + b*b) is the probability that, if measured in the 0/1 basis, it will result in 0, and |c + di| the probability it will result in 1.

The presence of i (the imaginary number, in case that wasn't clear), is important. Also, you can measure a qubit in any basis, not just 0/1, which is actually vital to the way some quantum algorithms work. (Notably quantum key exchange, which relies on the fact that a potential eavesdropper doesn't know what basis he should be measuring the qubit in.) A good way to imagine a single qubit is a bloch sphere. Imagine a sphere, where straight up is 0, and straight down is 1. Anything on the equator is a 50/50 superposition of 0 and 1.
Also, to say that quantum computers are more "efficient" than classical computers isn't quite precise enough for my tastes. It's not that they're capable of doing the same things as a classical computer can, just faster. It's that they're able to do things classical computers simply cannot do due to the way superposition works. And those things allow it to solve a number of problems more efficiently.

more than 5 years ago
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New AES Attack Documented

SeekerDarksteel Re:Quantum Computers (236 comments)

To clarify, quantum cryptography (which _should_ be called quantum key exchange) is just a method of exchanging a private key securely. This private key can then be used on an insecure channel. It is also ridiculously overhyped, particularly by people who don't fully understand it. Current implementations require a direct fiber-optic line between Alice and Bob, and is still vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks, presuming that the man in the middle is able to compromise both the direct quantum line as well as the insecure channel over which the measurement orientations are exchanged and later communication is established.

more than 5 years ago
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New AES Attack Documented

SeekerDarksteel Re:Quantum Computers (236 comments)

How exactly does Grover's Algorithm help in this situation? With Grover's, you have an unsorted list and want to look up the position of an arbitrary element in the list. This takes O(n) sequentially, but O(sqrt(n)) with Grover's. It has absolutely nothing to do with guessing. In brute-forcing a block cipher, you have a large number of keys and you need to try each one sequentially. There's no lookup involved at all. I'm afraid I'm gonna have to call bullshit, something I need to do all too much in QC related topics.

more than 5 years ago
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Ubisoft To Shut Down Shadowbane

SeekerDarksteel Re:PvP (74 comments)

Shadowbane's group v group combat was very interesting. Unfortunately it was about the only thing worthwhile about the game. The completely open nature of pvp did make running around solo or in small groups a pain in the ass, and there was massive class disparity. But there was just something about 10 v 10 group combat that no other game has seemed to get the same. One of my fondest memories of the game was when my guild was defending a mine. We had one priest, one bard, and 8 crossbow warriors. One guy would call out a target and all the crossbowmen would skewer the target. We held off three consecutive groups that way.

The only other thing that I liked was the extremely flexible nature of character classes. A single class could have many different viable builds, each one drastically different. The same class could be a super-high defense low damage tank, a high-damage decent defense melee dps, or a decent ranged nuker. Some of the builds were in fact completely unintentional and only came about due to experimentation.

more than 5 years ago

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