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The Shale Boom Won't Stop Climate Change; It Could Make It Worse

Sesostris III Re:Nukes Now (392 comments)

Not sure why this is being modded 'Funny'. Quite a few 'environmentalists' are starting to revisit Nuclear Power, e.g. George Monbiot (A regular columnist in the Guardian newspaper).

Personally, I can't help thinking that technology may have advanced since we last built nuclear reactors. Certainly I think any IT would be more advanced - just don't connect to the internet!

about a week ago
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The Shale Boom Won't Stop Climate Change; It Could Make It Worse

Sesostris III Re:We are doomed... (392 comments)

I agree. There is no-one thinking 50 to 100, or even 200 years ahead. Short term is the order of the day. It will be the future generations that suffer.

I don't have children, but if I did I would be intensely concerned with the environment I would be leaving them - and their children in turn. Yet as far as I can tell, those I know who do have children seem unconcerned. It is the immediate future that interests them ("new shiny") rather than the long term.

It didn't used to be like this. The old European cathedrals were planned and built over decades, if not centuries (Cathedral Building in the Middle Ages).

In 50 to 100 years time when fossil fuel resources start to run out, our children's children will have to do what we should be doing now, and develop renewable resources. They will have to do so with a (most likely) more hostile environment (due to climate change) and without the reserves of fossil fuel to help kick-start the change.

Maybe using all these fossil fuels won't cause catastrophic climate change, and the naysayers are wrong. However, it seems to me to be a gamble, the stakes of which are the future lives of our children and their children. Unfortunately it seems to be a gamble many are willing to make.

I would rather we didn't make this gamble. I would rather we "bite the bullet" now. Take the hit, make sacrifices to our lifestyle and go hell-bent for long-term sustainable renewables. For the sake of our children (and their children).

We won't, which I find heartbreakingly sad. The only consolation I have - and it is an empty consolation at that - is that my descendants won't be affected, as I don't have any children.

about a week ago
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Bank Security Software EULA Allows Spying On Users

Sesostris III No Linux Version (135 comments)

I get prompted to download this regularly by my bank. However I use Linux, and they don't produce a Linux version. No idea if they plan to do so either.

Strangely, I'm not that concerned. I would download and use if I used Windows though, even with the new EULA.

about two weeks ago
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Node.js Forked By Top Contributors

Sesostris III Re:Joyent unfit to lead them? (254 comments)

Reading the blog, he would not have been fired for using the gendered pronoun, but for refusing to accept it being changed.

It's important. If you don't think it is, try looking for any gendered pronoun in (say) the Eclipe Documentation (Think IBM) or in the Java Tutorial (think Oracle).

And no, I haven't looked at it in depth, but I trust both IBM and Oracle to use gender neutral pronouns (except for the rare cases when they want to specify the gender of a person, as in "Alice" or "Bob"). What is good enough for IBM and Oracle (and every other corporation out there) is good enough for Joyent.

about two weeks ago
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Node.js Forked By Top Contributors

Sesostris III Re:Joyent unfit to lead them? (254 comments)

Sorry, can't share your outrage. Using gender-neutral pronouns for documentation seems reasonable to me, especially if viewable by the public, and if that documentation is linked to your company. To refuse to correct gendered pronouns just seems perverse.

about two weeks ago
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How Intel and Micron May Finally Kill the Hard Disk Drive

Sesostris III Re:Price not yet announced (438 comments)

From the first review I stumbled upon;

Cons:
- Samsung recommends turning off indexing for reliability. Doing so means that you can no longer search for files from the "Search programs or files"

Eh?

about a month ago
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Crowdfunded Linux Voice Magazine Releases First Issue CC-BY-SA

Sesostris III Re:Slashdot (62 comments)

You forgot to mention "graph-plotters". Absolutely fascinating to watch in action. Around in the late '80s and early '90s for drawing A4 diagrams. Run from an old-style IBM PC.

(But then I also remember punched cards!)

about a month ago
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Crowdfunded Linux Voice Magazine Releases First Issue CC-BY-SA

Sesostris III Re:Slashdot (62 comments)

I like physical books - there are people like me who still buy them. I like dead-tree newspapers - I, like many, still get theirs daily. I like dead-tree magazines - easy to flick-through and just browse. So that's why.

Oh, and yes, I am a subscriber to Linux Voice.

(So to the magazine and its staff - thanks).

about a month ago
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How To Anesthetize an Octopus

Sesostris III Re:How?? (105 comments)

Maybe consciousness isn't dependent on a physical body. However a physical anaesthetic when applied to a physical body can certainly "un" it! (albeit temporarily).

about a month ago
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How To Anesthetize an Octopus

Sesostris III Re:How?? (105 comments)

Can computers become conscious? How would you anesthetise a conscious computer?

Today octopodes, tomorrow computers. See - relevant!

about a month ago
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When We Don't Like the Solution, We Deny the Problem

Sesostris III Re:Senator James Inhofe (282 comments)

Ho hum. Some actual data:

Mean Central England Temperature Annual Anomalies, 1772 to 8th November 2014

Global-average temperature records (Global average temperature anomaly 1850 - 2012) One data set from a part of the UK, and one a global data set. The last few years are interesting in the UK set, and the trend in the global set is clear. By the way, note the ".gov.uk" moniker. This is an official UK government organisation, independent of party politics.

about a month and a half ago
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When We Don't Like the Solution, We Deny the Problem

Sesostris III Re:Senator James Inhofe (282 comments)

Thank you

I wasn't accusing you of lying. What I wanted was some examples. (I've no particular agenda).

May I be permitted to make some observations?

Firstly making an incorrect prediction isn't lying as such, especially if the mistake is admitted.

Secondly, I'm not sure Al Gore is a scientist (I believe him to be a politician), so I'm not sure I would take his prediction seriously. (Now if he was quoting a scientist or scientists, that would be different. Was he?) (I should add that I'm not a US citizen, so forgive me if I have a tendency to disregard what politicians on either side of your political divide say. I don't particularly trust what my politicians say either, whatever their politics).

Thirdly, I'm curious as to where they say that you would face numerous hurricanes more powerful than Katrina. I would expect a scientist (as opposed to a politician) to make a statistical statement. Not to say that you are wrong - it just sounds like a peculiar statement for a scientist to make.

Fourthly, whenever I see predictions on ocean level rise, the timescale is usually hundreds of years (i.e. "by 2100 ..."), so I'm intrigued as to where the statement that beach houses in Florida should be under water comes from. When is this meant to be by?

Finally, as to "NO WARMING", there is a difference between climate and weather. As to weather, we've just had the driest (and one of the warmest) Septembers in the UK on record, and have just had the warmest Halloween on record. As this is weather rather than climate, I am happy to leave it to the climate experts (i.e. scientists, and not politicians) to come to conclusions.

One thing I can predict, when we find out for certain whether our current activities cause climate change (i.e. in a couple of hundred years or so, when all the fossil fuels have been used up and the consequences of using them as we have are better understood, not just by scientists but by politicians and the population at large), it won't affect me. I'll be long gone. As I don't have (and now won't have) children, it's not going to affect any of my descendents either.

Unlike us, those who are around however will know (experience) the truth. You are certain of your position on this matter. As I don't think humanity will change it's behaviour, I hope for their sake you are right.

about a month and a half ago
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When We Don't Like the Solution, We Deny the Problem

Sesostris III Re:Senator James Inhofe (282 comments)

There have been undeniable lies presented by AGW supporters, and I'm sure the book lists them.

If there are undeniable lies, then you should be able to list a few of them (without us needing to buy the book). Indeed, please do.

Thanks.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Choosing a Data Warehouse Server System?

Sesostris III Apache family (147 comments)

If I was tasked with coming up with ideas for a Data Warehouse Server System, and given that I know almost nothing about such systems, my first port of call would probably be Apache. What about Cassandra, Hadoop, Hive, Mahout or Pig (or combinations thereof)? All of these are downloadable and playable-with (and being Apache, FLOSS).

As a previous poster pointed out, there is also PostgreSQL, again FLOSS. Again downloadable and playable-with.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Choosing a Data Warehouse Server System?

Sesostris III Re:Dear Slashdot, (147 comments)

Maybe. However I would also be interested in any answer (especially any answer involving FLOSS software). Interested not because it's my job or my company is looking to use such software, but because I'm curious and like to expand my knowledge.

In general I don't mind such questions on Slashdot, as they're usually interesting and informative to the rest of us. And if they're not, then I (we) don't read the article!

about a month and a half ago
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Scotland Votes No To Independence

Sesostris III Re:Too bad (474 comments)

Actually, this comment hits on an interesting issue. The problem with Greece et al is not the EU, it is the Euro, i.e. a shared currency. The UK is in the EU, but not the Euro (we've still got Sterling).

One of the claims of the Yes proponents in the Scottish Referendum was that Scotland could share a currency with the rest of the UK, despite being a separate country, i.e. Scotland and the UK could have a currency union without a political union. This was firmly rejected by the Westminster parties, and this rejection may have influenced the No vote. The reason for the rejection of sharing Sterling is precisely because of what is happening within the Euro zone of the EU - without some form of political union, a currency union will not work.

(I should add that I think the Euro zone shouldn't abandon the Euro to get it to work, but should engage in greater political union! I would like the UK to be there as well, but currently the idea of the UK joining the Euro - currency and political union - is as likely as a viable chocolate teapot, more's the pity)

about 3 months ago
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Scotland Votes No To Independence

Sesostris III Interesting geographical breakdown (474 comments)

As an Englishman observing this from outside Scotland (but from within the UK), I find the geographical breakdown interesting. The overall result was 55.30% No and 44.70 % Yes, but looking at the results from the 32 councils only four had majorities for the Yes vote. 28 had a majority for No (albeit very slim in one instance).

The councils where the Yes vote was in the majority were all urban. In all the rural (and some urban) councils the No vote had the majority. OK, some of these are a lot smaller (in population) than the councils where the Yes vote had the majority, but they were a lot larger geographically.

What was very interesting was that some areas which voted No are SNP strongholds, including Alex Salmon's own constituency.

I think there is enough here to keep the pundits going for months!

about 3 months ago
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Scotland Votes No To Independence

Sesostris III Re:Everyone loses (474 comments)

I'm sorry, are you asking why a politician would lie?

Because the UK is a democracy, and they'll get voted out if caught at it!

(Incidentally, a few ex-MPs have been imprisoned over the past few years for making false expenses claims).

about 3 months ago
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Scotland Votes No To Independence

Sesostris III Re:A glorious victory for all (474 comments)

There are probably a lot of people in both Scotland and the rest of the UK who agree with you! Interestingly there were no plans for an independent Scotland to give up the monarchy. The Queen would've remained their Head of State, as she is for Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

Incidentally, the Union of the Crowns predates the Union of the Parliaments.

about 3 months ago
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Scotland Votes No To Independence

Sesostris III Re:The over-65's swung it for No (474 comments)

Since I last posted, the pledge from the parties behind the No campaign for more devolution powers have already fallen apart. A lot of people voted no because they were promised a more federalised UK

I assume you mean Milliband's statement at 17:42 BST:

"Our task now is to make sure that we deliver on the timetable we've set out, to deliver extra powers to the Scottish Parliament, and we will deliver on that."

See http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-scotland-29130277

Don't worry, as someone from England, I want to see the leaders keep the promise they made. Don't give up yet!

(For our non-UK readers Milliband is the leader of the Official Opposition, and potential next Prime Minister. His words carry clout.)

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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UK organisation set up to encourage IPv6 adoption, closes

Sesostris III Sesostris III writes  |  about 2 years ago

Sesostris III (730910) writes "In April 2010, with £20,000 of government money, 6uk was set up to encourage the adoption of the IPv6 protocol in the UK. In December 2012 the board resigned en-masse in protest at official indifference to its work.

"The biggest organisation we needed to join 6UK was the government" the former director, Philip Sheldrake, is quoted as saying. Without government support "There's no material incentive for any organisation to go for IPv6". Government interest can be gauged by the fact that no government website currently sat on an IPv6 address.

The UK is among the nations that have done the least to move to IPv6, and lags behind other nations in adopting the new protocol. In contrast, governments like that in the US are encouraging adoption of the new protocol by mandating IPv6 compliance in contracts."

Link to Original Source

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