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Comments

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Tim Cook Says Apple Can't Read Users' Emails, That iCloud Wasn't Hacked

Shadowmist Re:If true thats great (191 comments)

Apple has no way of automatically installing music on your devices with your permission.

That is a 100% correct statement. If you haven't turned on automatically download music purchases (i.e. permission), nothing installed on anyone device.

Apparently there were a vocal group of folks having a hissy fit at suddenly finding a U2 album on their iPods after the last keynote.

about a week ago
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Early iPhone 6 Benchmark Results Show Only Modest Gains For A8

Shadowmist Re:First 64bit (207 comments)

That just means Apple has to come up with new reasons to obsolete the current-2 versions of devices running their iOS. Which won't be a problem. They're good at that.

IOS 8 is going to be pushed as far back as the iPhone 4S. Now go ahead, wrap that up in your canard, and smoke it.

about a week ago
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Curiosity Rover Arrives At Long-Term Destination

Shadowmist Re:Knee-jerk reaction (33 comments)

On the other hand I also wonder why in almost 40 years nobody has yet tried repeating the labeled-release experiment on Viking which tested positive per the pre-mission criteria for signs of life.

That's not exactly the way it turned out. The test got some major initial results when it was applied than nothing. The results from Viking fit the parameters of a very reactive and toxic surface, not for the presence of life, either archival or extent.

about two weeks ago
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Early iPhone 6 Benchmark Results Show Only Modest Gains For A8

Shadowmist Re:First 64bit (207 comments)

"Certainly that was true of the A7 SoC, the world's first 64-bit smartphone processor."

What's the point of a 64bit processor with 1 GB of RAM?

If nothing else, it lays the groundwork for future phones with more memory as well as ensuring that the I6 phones will be running the same OS as the iphone 7 and possibly 8.

about two weeks ago
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Early iPhone 6 Benchmark Results Show Only Modest Gains For A8

Shadowmist Re:What about the camera? (207 comments)

I'd never buy an iPhone, sorry, I don't like the idea of being locked into the Apple way... but I've seen little mention of how the camera compares to current flagship Android phones

I'll take the Apple way over the Malware Range that passes for an app ecosystem in Droid land. It's either that or apps that don't free memory when they're not working. At idle, my Samsung Galaxy is still using 75 percent of it's built in RAM. And that's AFTER running the garbage collection application.

about two weeks ago
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Early iPhone 6 Benchmark Results Show Only Modest Gains For A8

Shadowmist Re:Keynote acknowledged this (207 comments)

I guess you'd rather be back in the days when all system graphics had to go through the CPU instead of being offloaded to things like graphics and sound cards. Offloading to coprocessors is what enabled Amigas to run Mac OS faster than the Macs using the exact same CPU .

about two weeks ago
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How Scientific Consensus Has Gotten a Bad Reputation

Shadowmist Re:Pseudoscience (770 comments)

If there is no way to set up a test to and verify the results it falls more into the field of pseudoscience rather than science. If there is a way to test and verify but the data to do so isn't provided then it is more likely that it falls into the category of scam rather than science. (e-cat anyone?)

Climate science is given as an example. I don't see any reason to why results based on a model can't be backed up by providing said model or even the source code for verification.

Peer review is an important part of the global scientific progress. "Piltdown Man" is an excellent example of the need for peer review, which keeps true psuedo science such as perpetual motion and quackery like so-called "Cold Fusion" at bay. I find it rather astonishing at s-called open source advocates who praise the peer review mechanism to spot out bad code yet downplay it's importance in any other field.

about two weeks ago
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NASA Panel Finds Fault WIth Curiosity Rover Project's Focus

Shadowmist Curiosity is an exception.... (51 comments)

.... in that it's extended mission is coming before the primary mission. However if they don't do something about the wear and tear on the rover's tire treads, it may never get to the primary mission.

about two weeks ago
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3 Years In, a "B" For Tim Cook's Performance at Apple

Shadowmist Re:Stock is at a record high (90 comments)

Compared to focus on quarterly balance sheets... yeah.

about a month ago
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How Gygax Lost Control of TSR and D&D

Shadowmist Re:When going into business with Friends (183 comments)

All in all a classic carpetbagger move by Williams that everyone except Gygax fell for.

Oh? Keep in mind that it was Gygax himself who brought her in. Much how like Steve Jobs brought in Sculley, who later led the move to oust Jobs from Apple.

about 2 months ago
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Why the FCC Is Likely To Ignore Net Neutrality Comments and Listen To ISPs

Shadowmist Re:Who Needs an Article to Tell Me This? (140 comments)

The ISP's can't prevent them from doing this and ISP's customers can choose another ISP that doesn't do it, or at least offers better performance. Another possibility is that the content providers the ISP's are throttling will eventually become ISP's themselves, especially Google.

Waiting for Google to save us is essentially waiting for something that's not going to happen. Most users are stuck between a choice of one ISP or perhaps two, both of which engaged in the same practices.

about 2 months ago
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Interview: Edward Stone Talks About JPL and Space Exploration

Shadowmist Re:My question was not answered (57 comments)

"And what good is FTL drive when you still need large rockets to get off of 1G gravity wells?" because once we get into orbit we can go to the stars? Seriously, that was a stupid question.

No, there are no practical models at this time for 'FTL'(I include warp like techs in that), but do you seriously think that if we did manage it, we wouldn't go to other planets of star becasue we need to lift it into orbit first?

So you don't see a problem with the fact that we still need the equivalent of a Saturn 1B rocket to get people off the ground? What good is a starship when you can't land and off the planets you discover?

about 2 months ago
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Airbus Patents Windowless Cockpit That Would Increase Pilots' Field of View

Shadowmist Re:Patentable? (468 comments)

Aside from digging up prior art on such a thing, how is this idea patentable in any way, other than a very specific implementation? I.e., using certain technologies for range finding to ground, picture display, and umm... reasons?

You have absolutely no idea on how patent law is applied.

about 2 months ago
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Airbus Patents Windowless Cockpit That Would Increase Pilots' Field of View

Shadowmist Re:Power? We dont need no stink'n power! (468 comments)

So what happens when the first plane has a power blip, or an engine failure? How can you land with no view?

Airline pilots have what is known as an Instrument Flight Rating for a reason. They don't depend on looking out the window to fly.

about 2 months ago
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Interview: Edward Stone Talks About JPL and Space Exploration

Shadowmist Re:My question was not answered (57 comments)

I wanted to know why we're wasting money on this type of thing now, when we should be investing in FTL research. Once we perfect that, it will make any money we've spent exploring in the conventional way wasted money. We would be able to go out and retrieve the Voyager probes and bring them back into a museum and say 'job well done, boys, but we don't need you anymore.' Ultimately all these conventional missions will turn out to be a waste of resources, pushing back the time until we can get the FTL drive operational.

Because when it comes to FTL, there is no practical science to throw money at. (quantum models which require the bulk of the universes matter converted to energy to test are a bit far from "practical engineering".) And what good is FTL drive when you still need large rockets to get off of 1G gravity wells? Which you'd realize if your scientific knowledge extended something beyond LeVar Burton would be reading off a Star Trek shooting script. We are still in the evolving stage of enabling humans to live in space for long durations without making cripples or cancer patients out of them. We still have a large solar system to explore that we've only started scratching the surface of. Let's not jump the gun of our expectations.

about 2 months ago
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A Tour of One of the World's Only Underwater Labs With Fabien Cousteau

Shadowmist Re:For becoming fish... (30 comments)

....they should remove bubbles.

His grandpa did that decades ago. How is that today we can't do it?

Cousteau's deep divers DID have exhalation bubbles. rebreathers simply will not function beyond very shallow dives. Because you must balance your own internal pressure against that of the sea, and the human lung wasn't evolved for doing much more than 1 bar. You may be thinking of Conshelf Three which was an extended habitat some 328 feet below the surface. There were no exhalation bubbles because it was necessary to tether the aquanauts to the habitat with hoses delivering fresh helix (an air mix of about 98 percent helium and 2 percent oxygen) and retrieving it from the user's lungs. As they were breathing over 10 x surface pressure this was necessary to prevent the habitat from losing it's air and consequently being flooded. The triple tank backpacks they wore were only for emergency use and would have provided at most about 10 minutes of breathing. For a shallow lab like this one, there is no need to tether the divers in this fashion.

about 2 months ago
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Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Shadowmist Re:Science loves to dance... (686 comments)

Mars doesn't have internal dynamo because it it tiny, it cooled off already. Earth sized rocky planets with similar composition take billions of years to cool, and so will have magnetic field.

Why does Venus then, which is about the size of Earth and fairly similar in composition so lack a magnetic field?

about 3 months ago
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Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Shadowmist Re:Huge planet = Huge gravity (686 comments)

17 x the mass does not mean 17x the gravity. But even if the gravity is only say 3x that of Earth, it'd be a bit much for the human spine to deal with.

about 3 months ago
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Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Shadowmist Re:Radio: the first assumption (686 comments)

While there are many creatures on Earth that have some of our particular things we consider a sign of intelligence, there is none that replicates the complete package. That's an important distinction.

about 3 months ago
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Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Shadowmist Re:What alien would think to look here? (686 comments)

I currently subscribe to a variant of this climate change theory. (Natural, not anthropogenic.)

My variant is that all, or almost all the civilizations the aliens know about formed around red dwarf stars. It's nice and stable there for very long periods of time. We're only stable here by luck - and our big moon helps some.

It shows how little you know about red dwarfs. There are some big problems with life on a red dwarf. 1. The damm things are rather cold as stars go. So to get the kind of heat that's needed for liquid water, you've got to be pretty close to the parent star... and that has two major consequences. The first is tidal locking which means the same face is facing the start constantly. The more serious problem is proximity.... At that distance the solar wind is so dense it would overwhelm what would be a nearly non existent magnetic field. (because of the slow rotation from part 1). The planet's atmosphere would literally be blown away by the highly ionized solar wind.

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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World of Warcraft Players Need Not Apply

Shadowmist Shadowmist writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Shadowmist writes "From the New York Times BITS (Buisness Innovation Techology Society) blog:

In at least one known incidents employers have been telling recruiters "not to send them World of Warcraft players. He said there is a belief that WoW players cannot give 100% because their focus is elsewhere, their sleeping patterns are often not great, etc."

On one hand, the recruiter may have a point: Massively multiplayer online games can require a high level of engagement — players must spend long hours playing to advance their characters and participate in game activities such as raids. It's not uncommon for subscribers to log as many as 30 hours per week."

Others argue that the management involved in leading guilds and raids serves as training in skills such as leadership and project managment.

But still this might be something you want to leave off your resume... or Facebook."

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