Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

The Smartphone That Spies, and Other Surprises

SillyNickName4me Re:I have an idea ... (132 comments)

Which doesn't at all change the point the parent is making... you don't have many options to verify that that button actually does what it claims to do, whereas it is a pretty well known fact among those who ever digged into the technology for a little bit, that a cellphone can be located to within a couple hundred meters, smartphone or not, location services or not.

If the military wants to make sure soldiers aren't trackable during deployment, forbidding cellphones alltogether is the only option.

more than 2 years ago
top

JBI's Plastic To Oil Gets Operating Permit

SillyNickName4me Re:Given how much oil it takes to make plastic.... (223 comments)

I'd like to point out 2 things here:
1. this is a form of re-cycling
2. there are many uses of plastics that are near impossible to avoid as a consumer.

So while I agree with your statement about bottled water, I think your statement about re-use/re-cycle/substitute is overly simplified, and ignores that this is just another way of re-cycling.

Yes, those things will help a fair bit but having a way to better re-cycle the plastic we end up with anyway is solving a problem independent of if people re-use/substitute plastics wherever they can.

That said, if turning it back into some form of oil and then burning it is an environmentally friendly solution is a good question.

more than 3 years ago
top

EasyDNS Falsely Accused of Unplugging WikiLeaks

SillyNickName4me Re:"Stand up for the cause"? (267 comments)

Nice and simple? no not at all.

The Chinese aren't so nice to not try to have spies gather any and all info they are interested in.

Is not so simple that the only way for the Chinese to figure out those things is by means of this leak. Rather, this leak shows how easy it was to obtain this information because of too many people having access to it (if its supposed to stay secret)

I think some people may be exposed, but is that the consequence of the actions of the whistle-blower?

Or would it be the consequence of bad policies that sabotaged transparency, and the response to that?

more than 3 years ago
top

EasyDNS Falsely Accused of Unplugging WikiLeaks

SillyNickName4me Re:"Stand up for the cause"? (267 comments)

Hmm, you think, the Chinese gov needs Wikileaks to know about those things?

I think that is slightly naive...

more than 3 years ago
top

MasterCard Hit By WikiLeaks Payback Attacks

SillyNickName4me Re:Adult responses vs epic tantrums (715 comments)

The government acts on behalf of the people it supposedly represents, that is why secrecy by the government is completely different from you being able to communicate privately with your inlaws.

Actions and communications by the government need to be open for scrutiny. You are right that there exist cases where it is in the interest of 'the people' that the government can communicate securely and privately, but those should be the exception, and not the default.

The government isn't a person, it is a very useful entity, but also a very scary one if not kept in check. Being able to see practically everything it does is paramount to being able to keep it in check.

more than 3 years ago
top

Avoiding Mistakes Can Be a Huge Mistake

SillyNickName4me Re:WTF? (268 comments)

http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=1047369&cid=25955783

is where closedsource, not anyone else, brought up a n arbitrary claim about 10x faster code. The only place where I ever mention it is in saying it is not a comparable claim.

So excuse me?

more than 5 years ago
top

Avoiding Mistakes Can Be a Huge Mistake

SillyNickName4me Re:WTF? (268 comments)

If experience would tell me you are a brilliant programmer often finding novel and much faster ways of doing something, and you'd now claim that you invented a 10x faster sort algorithm, I'd likely believe you on faith. Lacking that experience however I'd like to see your thing in effect to gain such experience.

more than 5 years ago
top

Avoiding Mistakes Can Be a Huge Mistake

SillyNickName4me Re:Real Talent? (268 comments)

And I was pointing out to ClosedSource that this 10x faster code HE brought up isn't anywhere similar to a programmer being able to produce code in 1/10th of the time.. so I think your reply should have been to ClosedSource instead?

more than 5 years ago
top

Avoiding Mistakes Can Be a Huge Mistake

SillyNickName4me Re:Real Talent? (268 comments)

If I told you that I developed a new sorting method that is 10x faster than any known method, would you accept it on faith or expect some proof? Why should we get sloppy about these productivity claims?

No, but if you claimed you on your own implemented some very complex system in less time then a competing group of 10 programmers did, I'd at least consider it possible.

Not to mention, you are comparing apples and oranges. That someone can do the same as a larger group and needs less time for it does in no way whatsoever compare to someone developing a 10x faster algorithm.

more than 5 years ago
top

Proprietary Blobs and the Pursuit of a Free Kernel

SillyNickName4me Re:I am typing this from Gnewsense (405 comments)

The fact that YOU don't understand the ideas of RMS does not make those ideas arbitrary or extreme. It MAY as well say something about your level of understanding as about those ideas.

If you want to call them arbitrary and extreme, that is your good right, but if you do so in a discussion, you better be prepared to provide an argument as to why you think so.

Matter of fact is that in certain parts of the market, those ideas have been quite succesful, and seem to be understood by lots of people.

more than 5 years ago
top

Avoiding Mistakes Can Be a Huge Mistake

SillyNickName4me Re:Real Talent? (268 comments)

whoops, me bad. Was following the posts from someone else (closedsource) who was using virtually the same argument, and failed to notice the name above your post.

more than 5 years ago
top

Avoiding Mistakes Can Be a Huge Mistake

SillyNickName4me Re:Real Talent? (268 comments)

Yes. Specifically, real engineers and their companies get hauled to court if the product they designed blows up in the user's face. Software engineers don't; they and their company get paid more to help the users deal with the errors they made - this is known as "support".

May I point out that for example IBM has quite a few 'software engineers' that have the IBM follow title? And the same applies at for example HP. So this is definitely not limited to 'physical engineering'.

I've been reading through many of your posts in this discussion. Many of the things you say are true in certain kinds of environments, but definitely not true in other environments.

I find the 'one size fits all' kind of reasoning you express rather disturbing, 'one size fits all' is a well known management trap that inevitably results in (long term) failure. Yes, it makes management easier, but it makes your competitive position a lot worse in any market where perceived quality plays any role (that is, where the perception of the customer of delivered quality is important)

more than 5 years ago
top

Avoiding Mistakes Can Be a Huge Mistake

SillyNickName4me Re:Perhaps (268 comments)

What you express is the difference between what I'd call a 'code factory' and a 'tech company'.

The first doesn't produce technology, they implement it. For that, an industrial process is often very useful because of its predictability.

The later is the kind of company that actually gets us 'new' things, the results are not always easy to predict.

And I rather disagree with your statement about code excellence belonging in CS academia if anywhere. Any place where mediacore is not 'good enough' is a place for this, that includes many 'mission critical' applications, any place where getting those few % better performance is important (and don't tell me those don't exist, I work for one, and I know many examples of places where this can be a really big competative advantage), or any similar requirements.

What you describe is the method used for producing 'consumer' and 'commodity' software. Your process has no place outside those areas because it can never achieve the above mediacore quality required.

Attaching a real technical writer to a really good technical programmer however can quite do the trick. Its a bit more expensive, but it can easily overcome the mediacore barrier.

Not to mention, I am amazed by your 'one size fits all' kind of reasoning. Doing the same as everyone else is a guaranteed way of having a business that will only survive for as long as the market is good to excelent, or stuck on your standard due to cost of moving to something else. It will never ever survive in an environment where you actually have to compete on product quality, hence in the long term it is doomed.

This all isn't saying that documentation and QA is not important, but it is saying that there are many ways to achieve this, and that the result is what counts, and being stuck in one way to achieve this result is a sure way to miss business oppertunities.

more than 5 years ago
top

40 Years Ago, the US Lost a Nuclear Bomb

SillyNickName4me Re:Imperialism Gone Mad (470 comments)

My point is that it doesn't matter if we tell them to piss off, they are in this to protect themselves, so what we have to say about it doesn't matter one way or the other.

If it becomes too troublesome, enough will eventually take their loss to make the whole thing collapse.

The rest of the world would probably complain if we didn't let them bail us out.

I explicitly stated that letting the US economy collapse is going to be painful, so obviously many prefer to repair things over letting them collapse.

This doesn't at all change the point I was making:

If you think you don't have to answer to those keeping you afloat you are a fool bound to find yourself without help at some point when you need it. That has nothing to do whatsoever with self censorship and everything with getting rid of some arrogance.

And obviously, you are totally entitled to your own beliefs, but I think the OP was making a point in a possibly somewhat provokative way.

more than 5 years ago
top

40 Years Ago, the US Lost a Nuclear Bomb

SillyNickName4me Re:Imperialism Gone Mad (470 comments)

Oh, one thing I forgot in my previous answers.

I am in this case critisizing the USA. That does in no way mean that I limit myself to the USA, just that that happens to be the country being discussed in this case.

Pointing at others to deflect critisism is a nice example of a stawman argument, hence invalid.

more than 5 years ago
top

40 Years Ago, the US Lost a Nuclear Bomb

SillyNickName4me Re:Imperialism Gone Mad (470 comments)

The point is that the USA needs the rest of the world more then the rest of the world needing the USA.

If you need someone, it is pretty stupid to piss them off.

more than 5 years ago
top

40 Years Ago, the US Lost a Nuclear Bomb

SillyNickName4me Re:Imperialism Gone Mad.....FUNDS??? (470 comments)

So, whom is the USA borrowing money from again?

If that 'investment' ever pays off is questionable, but what is totally not questionable is that the USA would be bankrupt a few times over without such investments.

But hey, its soooo smart to tell people whom you happen to need to piss off...

At any rate, people like you are the exact reason why there are many people on this planet who despise the USA (and yeah, they should despise people like you instead of an entire country)

Oh, and your 2nd ammandment does not provide any protection against jetfighters, missiles and what not, and it is also not needed to enable a population to act against repressive government (see the French revolution, and many many many more revolutions arount the world for proof of that)

Anyway, I doubt you understand any of this, considering the brilliant argumentation you presented.

more than 5 years ago
top

40 Years Ago, the US Lost a Nuclear Bomb

SillyNickName4me Re:Imperialism Gone Mad (470 comments)

Don't overstate your point. This isn't the reverse Marshall Plan we are talking about here. There is a reason that other countries are supporting our economy currently.

Where did I say that this is some form of charity or a 'reverse marshial plan' ?

My simple point is that telling someone to piss off when you also need that someone is stupid.

more than 5 years ago
top

40 Years Ago, the US Lost a Nuclear Bomb

SillyNickName4me Re:Imperialism Gone Mad (470 comments)

Yeah, I've heard of it. So what's your point? I was responding to the comment that the US somehow has to answer to other countries just because they buy our goods and services.

I made the point that the rest of the world is funding the deflicts of the USA, you responded to that. Are you too stupid to understand that your comment was just irrelevant?

more than 5 years ago
top

40 Years Ago, the US Lost a Nuclear Bomb

SillyNickName4me Re:Imperialism Gone Mad (470 comments)

Some of the Founding Fathers advocated for a non-interventionist foreign policy free of "entanglements" (Washington). Others (Jefferson) were in favor of an interventionist foreign policy. Trying to paint all of the founding fathers with one broad brush stroke is a mistake.

Sure, but there is one USA as a result. Besides, this is not a matter of non intervention, but of when you do intervene.

The idea that you do not get entangled in foreign conflicts by a non interventionalist foreign policy is rubbish anyway because you are not alone on this world, and what happens in the rest of the world affects you as much as what you do affecting the rest of the world.

Non interventionalist ideas are a pipe dream.

Again, the question is when and how you intervene.

All powers eventually decline. Personally I wouldn't mind seeing my country decline a little bit and focus on the home front instead of the globe. I would want to see another Democracy come forward and assume our place in the World first though

1. define democracy
2. a better alternative might not be recognizable to you as such
3. this does not at all change the fact that I am being critical of the attitude of SOME people in the USA. Bringing in other countries does nothing whatsoever to dispute my comments.

-- since that doesn't appear too likely in the next few decades I think we'll have to resign ourselves to our respective roles in the World. You may not like it

That is an easy, cheap and bad conclusion.

Being critical of some specific behavior says nothing whatsoever about if I like the USA or not, or about my general opinion about the position of the USA. It says something about my opinion about that specific behavior. Please stop jumping to conclusions about what I think unless I actually say what I think.

It is much much much more likely that I actually like the USA in that position over some other country, but still am critical of some specific behavior of some people.

but ask yourself if you'd really be happier seeing China or Russia in our place.

Strawman argument. Them being arguably worse does in no way dispute the critisism I am voicing.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

top

SillyNickName4me SillyNickName4me writes  |  more than 7 years ago

SillyNickName4me writes "Since friday (november 10th) evening at around 10:30pm (UTC), I have been noticing a very dramatic drop in spam related smtp activity. Where my private smtp server used to get some tens to hundreds of spam related smtp connects/minute, at the moment it is averaging on less then 6/hour. I haven't got numbers from other mail servers that I maintain yet, but simply looking at the size of logfiles on those servers indicates the same thing, and on one of the bigger servers I maintain, I used to see over 10000 delivery attempts/hour, while right now there is less then 2 attempts/minute.

A live view on an MTA (inbound MX) log that doesn't produce tens of lines of output/minute is something I simply have not seen in years now (other then by smtp not working, but that is not the case here, all the (non spam) mail I expect is still comming through without trouble)

Of course I am not complaining, but I'm rather curious as to what is causing this, I can not imagine the spammers just gave up all of a sudden, so I suspect it is only a temporary dip..

Is anyone else noticing the same? Anyone have an explanation?"

Journals

SillyNickName4me has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>