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Comments

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Ask Slashdot: Tools For Managing Multiple Serial Console Servers?

Skapare Re:Switch to a cloud system ... (104 comments)

IPMI can certain help at the hardware level. But if you need frequent hardware level access, or access to it by more than a couple people, something is wrong. The cloud infrastructure allows appropriate virtual level access (terminate an instance and start a new one). Maybe his "community access" was meant to do OS installs, which an infrastructure cloud stack would do. If not, maybe we need to know what the OP is really wanting to do.

about 10 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Tools For Managing Multiple Serial Console Servers?

Skapare Switch to a cloud system ... (104 comments)

... like OpenStack. Then you have access to everything.

about 10 months ago
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Internet Archive's San Francisco Home Badly Damaged By Fire

Skapare Re:Fire insurance (104 comments)

Sounds like someone didn't get the correct insurance.

about 10 months ago
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Internet Archive's San Francisco Home Badly Damaged By Fire

Skapare Re:Fire. Exclamation Mark. (104 comments)

They lost physical materials they were scanning. Those that had not yet been scanned cannot be scanned now, unless there are other copies of them somewhere.

about 10 months ago
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French Court Orders Google To Block Pictures of Ex-F1 Chief Mosley

Skapare Re: Fine. (180 comments)

So do it for IP address blocks allocated to France, and for IPs that have .fr RDNS.

about 10 months ago
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Most Drivers Would Hand Keys Over To Computer If It Meant Lower Insurance Rates

Skapare Can a computer do this in the drive? (449 comments)

On the way back from my grocery store, there is a stretch of road in a curve which has some worn out parts which make a lot of bumps. They are slight right of center in the left turning curve. The usual position people would drive in this curve would hit the bumps. If you drive through this curve slightly to the right (outside of the curve) you will miss the bumps. I remembered to do this after hitting those bumps maybe 10 to 20 times. Now I never hit the because I always drive slightly to the outside on this road. You cannot see this in the road until it is too late. You cannot seem them at all at night. That's why learning about them is the only way to avoid them. So can a computer learn them? Would it even know to avoid them on the 2nd pass?

about 10 months ago
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Republican Proposal Puts 'National Interest' Requirement On US Science Agency

Skapare Political parties ... (382 comments)

... should be required to justify their national interest.

about 10 months ago
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Stolen Adobe Passwords Were Encrypted, Not Hashed

Skapare encryption instead of hashing (230 comments)

When was encryption instead of hashing ever best or right practice? Did someone at Adobe just not understand and everyone else at Adobe accepted that?

about 10 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Simple Backups To a Neighbor?

Skapare Re:Amazing (285 comments)

I doubt Anonymous Coward has a job. He posts here several times an hour, every hours, 24 by 7. Unless his job is spamming out these ripoff web sites.

about 10 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Simple Backups To a Neighbor?

Skapare Hard drive rotation (285 comments)

What I do is make incremental backups to a set of 3 hard drives (which I just recently upgraded to USB 3.0 and 2TB each). I rotate them to/from my work location (but you could do this with a friend's or family member's house). I take one to work, and bring the other one that was at work back with me at the end of the day, and run the backup to it that night or the next day or two. I rotate about twice a week since usually a few days of lost data due to, say, my house burning down and destroying the backup drive, too, would be the least of my worries. So there is always at least one at home and at least one at work. If you are more paranoid, get 5 drives and do it more often. Or maybe use 2 sites away from home. If you work for the NSA ... uh ... nevermind.

I use a black one, a red one, and a blue one. I did not get the titanium one.

about 10 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Which Encrypted Cloud Storage Provider?

Skapare Re:Just say NO! (200 comments)

That's why people should make a backup of their online cloud storage.

about 10 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Which Encrypted Cloud Storage Provider?

Skapare Re:Open season on the cloud (200 comments)

Encrypt your own data yourself before handing it over to some online/cloud storage provider.

about 10 months ago
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HealthCare.gov: What Went Wrong?

Skapare Re:bitch and moan (400 comments)

As long as your provider keeps offering it you can keep your existing coverage. And the law does not require the provider to drop it. If your provider drops you, it is entirely THEIR fault.

about 10 months ago
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Exploiting Tomorrow's Solar Eclipse To Help Understand Sea Levels

Skapare Re:Let me get this straight (92 comments)

I'm sure a few people have noticed. But to be sure, I'll run a simulation.

about 10 months ago
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Twitter Marks Clean Sites As Harmful, Breaks Links

Skapare Re:libel.. (103 comments)

It's defamation if you cannot defend your position. Twitter is not defending their position.

about 9 months ago
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Twitter Marks Clean Sites As Harmful, Breaks Links

Skapare Re:News item #2 (103 comments)

Another way is to sue them and get it in the discovery process.

about 9 months ago
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Twitter Marks Clean Sites As Harmful, Breaks Links

Skapare Re:Are they really safe? (103 comments)

If they didn't determine the exact reason, they didn't do it right. They should not be blocking sites based on a bad process. Fix it.

about 9 months ago

Submissions

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Piracy Lawsuits for Dummies

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Skapare writes "TorrentFreak is reporting that John WIley & Sons is demanding a jury trial in a case of alleged copying of several "... for Dummies" book titles involving 4 named defendants. Mainstream coverage is at BBC.

This is a case to watch because the main evidence is IP addresses, which in an RIAA case expert testimony had desrcibed as "erroneous, unprofessional, and borderline incompetent". I wonder if the printer did it."

Link to Original Source
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Michael Jackson Slammed Record Companies

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes "In a recorded interview Michael Jackson did with his friend Brett Ratner, he reveals his lesson learned about the record companies:

BR: What is your greatest lesson learned?
MJ: Not to trust everybody ... not to trust everybody in the industry; there's a lot of sharks. And the record companies steal; they cheat. You have to audit them. And it's time for artists to take a stand against them, because they totally take advantage of them ... totally. They forget that it's the artists who make the company. Not the company make the artist. Without the talent, the company would be nothing but just ... hardware, and just ... you know ... and uh ... it takes a real good talent that the ... that the public wants to see.

The video is in black and white and it may have been secretly recorded. It begins with audio only and video comes on at 2:17 into the recording. At 3:06 the big question is asked."
Link to Original Source

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Norwegian lawyers must stop chasing file sharers

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes "TorrentFreak is reporting that Norway's Simonsen law firm has lost their license to chase after file sharers.

Just days after Norway's data protection department told ISPs they must delete all personal IP address-related data three weeks after collection, it's now become safer than ever to be a file-sharer in Norway. The only law firm with a license to track pirates has just seen it expire and it won't be renewed.

Sounds like Norway's government treats privacy seriously. Maybe they've been watching the abuses in the USA. More info on Norwegian perspective at Dagbladet.no."
Link to Original Source

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Autism Linked To Areas Of Higher Precipitation

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes ""Children living in areas of high precipitation may be more likely to have autism, according to a new study" reports WebMD in a recent article. "I strongly believe it's not the precipitation itself" says the study's lead author about the cause mechanism for autism and autism spectrum disorders. "My sense is, if truly there is an environmental trigger, my guess is it is one of the factors related to indoor activity." That could include reduced vitamin D due to less sunlight, exposure to chemicals in the home, extended TV viewing, or more use of computers. I'm curious why this study comes from a management school rather than a medical school. What is the business perspective on this? An earlier paper by the same authors suggests TV viewing as a possible cause."
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IRS still wants you to e-file

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes "This weekend, millions of people in the USA will be preparing (or having someone else prepare) their income tax returns at the last minute. Or they will be filing form 4868 so they can procrastinate for another six months. When I did mine, I was reading about the e-file program. It seems nothing has changed at the IRS except maybe the list of e-file partners. They still want people to e-file, but they still only accept e-filing through some business that does the e-filing for you. My state has the same requirements for e-filing.

So I printed my tax returns on paper and mailed them like I have for years. It cost me a couple stamps and I am reasonably confident that my tax return information is being kept confidential by this means. My communications is directly between me and the government, sealed in an envelope. My tiny refund will eventually come back in a sealed envelope as a paper check I can deposit in my bank.

So to the big question. OK, a few questions. What will it take for the IRS to be able to accept communications directly from citizens, in electronic form, without the possibility of some business spying on it? Why can't I just send a copy of my tax return electronically directly?

I can understand there are certain issues the IRS faces with people doing direct e-filing. One is the onslaught of internet connections in the first half of April every year. So they have these companies process the e-filing for them and aggregate them in bulk to ease the crunch. So why can't we encrypt the tax returns using an IRS public key so that only the IRS can decrypt them and these e-filing businesses can't snoop? Or is it the case that certain policitians are actually trying to let business get information about us. If the IRS were to ever start accepting tax filings directly electronically, I'd bet a lot of these e-filing business would complain to our elected politicians that their business model is being destroyed."

Link to Original Source
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Google puts the e-flux capacitor to work

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes "I've been wondering what all the secrecy is about at their new data centers. It seems Google has finally found a way to put the e-flux capacitor to work. Their new feature Gmail Custom Time now allows users to specify when in the past their email will be delivered (restricted to no further back than April 1, 2004). Now we can send yesterday's prank message, tomorrow, and have it arrive today."
Link to Original Source
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Granny's got 40 Gbps (not Mbps)

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes "Sigbritt Löthberg, 75, of Karlstad, Sweden, has the world's fastest home internet connection at 40 Gbps (that's a G, not an M), according to The Local. At this speed, she could download an HD DVD in 2 seconds, or watch 1500 HD TV shows at the same time. "The most difficult part of the whole project was installing Windows on Sigbritt's PC". I just hope it doesn't get infected by a botnet virus."
Link to Original Source
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Congress considering more low power FM stations

Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes "According to a ReclaimTheMedia article The Local Community Radio Act of 2007 [PDF] would remove the artificial restrictions imposed on LPFM by a 2000 law passed at the urging of corporate radio giants and NPR, claiming that small community stations would interfere with the signals of larger stations. If passed, this bill will pave the way for educational groups, nonprofits, unions, schools and local governments to launch new local radio stations across the country. More coverage is at Prometheous Radio Project, Free Press, and Expand Low-Power FM. More info via Google."
Link to Original Source
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Skapare Skapare writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Skapare (16644) writes "American Radio Relay Leauge President Joel Harrison has issued a statement [PDF] to ARES and other amateur radio volunteers to be cautious when submitting information for a criminal background check the American Red Cross now requires. Harrison (W5ZN) said the League recommends that anyone submitting personal information for a background check very carefully read what they are giving the ARC permission to collect. The Red Cross requires this background check to be conducted online through MyBackgroundCheck.com. According to the statement, this third party service requires authorization to obtain additional information such as a credit check and mode-of-living check, which is above and beyond the Red Cross' statement [PDF]of only needing a criminal background check. Using Firefox, I tested the MBC's Red Cross page by clicking on the "request a background check" link and was given a page that says the only acceptable browser is Microsoft's Internet Explorer. If they are that bad at programming a web site, how can I possibly trust they are keeping my private confidential data safe?

The ARRL news article goes on to say: In the course of the application process, prospective volunteers must agree to let MBC obtain a wide range of personal information bearing not just on criminal background and creditworthiness but, MBC says, "character, general reputation [and] personal characteristics." MBC advises, "The nature and scope of this disclosure and authorization is all-encompassing ..."

ARRL Public Service Team Leader Steve Ewald, WV1X, says ARES leaders can assign volunteers who don't want to submit to the ARC criminal background check to ARES duties "away from the action" that don't involve direct interaction with the ARC. "We certainly understand the risks that are involved in having background checks done — such as potential identity theft," Ewald told one worried SEC. "Those volunteers who do go through the background check will, indeed, enter at their own risk in this regard."

The Red Cross says it's gone to great lengths to ensure prospective volunteers are not giving out their Social Security numbers to anyone other than the contractor, and then only through a secure, encrypted Web site. "No additional information is needed," the Red Cross said, nor are the overall results of the background check shared with the ARC."

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