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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

Slashdot Parent Re:Already gone (304 comments)

Imagine the spouse's response when that inheritance comes in and you say "Well we might get divorced someday so to protect me and my selfish interests I'm putting it in a separate account and only spending it on me"

This is why if there is enough money involved that you care about it, you get an experienced attorney to do your estate plan.

I'm not by any means an expert in this area, other than that I had to face this a few years ago when my wife was very ill and her doctors were telling us that she wouldn't make it (she did make it and is 100% cancer-free!). We planned our estate so that if/when she passed, her half of the estate would go into a trust for the benefit of our children. That way, if I remarried, those assets wouldn't go to my new spouse in the case of a divorce or in case of my passing. They would still be held aside for the children.

My point being, if the dollars are significant enough to you that you would want to protect them, then you have to do the proper planning. If your parents are wealthy, for instance, you'll want to make sure that they use the proper trust structures to hold your inheritance so that these assets aren't directed into the wrong hands.

3 days ago
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Google Announces Motorola-Made Nexus 6 and HTC-Made Nexus 9

Slashdot Parent Re:Meh (200 comments)

(up front cost $50 or so instead of $650)

Who gives a shit if the up-front cost is only $50? You still have to pay the entire cost of the phone. You just have 2 years in which to do it.

3 days ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

Slashdot Parent Re:Already gone (304 comments)

Actually, I doubt that installing a GPS tracker on your own car and not telling your car's driver about it could be considered stalking. For an action to rise to the level of "stalking", there would need to be harassment involved. And the harassment would need to rise to the level that a reasonable person would fear for his or her safety.

The the case that we're discussing, the dude was definitely harassing his ex, making her very reasonably fear for her safety, so the stalking conviction makes total sense here. It was those actions, however, that led to the conviction as decided upon appeal. Had he just collected the GPS data for use in the divorce proceeding and not followed her around and threatened her and attacked a family member, the GPS tracker would have been fine.

3 days ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

Slashdot Parent Re:Already gone (304 comments)

However, during the divorce settlement it turns out that inheritance money wasn't considered community property and he became somehow liable on coming up with a big chunk of it when they split the assets.

Did your neighbor have a lawyer? Because my understanding is that inheritance is not considered part of the marital estate, but only if the inheritance money has been kept separate from the marital estate. As soon as wifey spent it on her new kitchen, it should have become joint property unless something really weird happened in this case.

3 days ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

Slashdot Parent Re:Already gone (304 comments)

The law doesn't distinguish between the two "owners" of shared marital assets. How, therefore, can it count as "stalking" to install a GPS tracker - Which have a plethora of entirely legitimate uses - in my own cars?

Exactly. In fact, I lost the link, but the guy who was mentioned in the OP who installed a GPS tracker on his and his wife's jointly-owned car had his conviction reversed on appeal because he was allowed to put a tracker on his own car.

He was, however, still convicted of stalking, but that wasn't because of the GPS tracker. It was because he attacked a family member and physically intimidated them or something like that. The tracker was fine.

4 days ago
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Positive Ebola Test In Second Texas Health Worker

Slashdot Parent Re:Just tell me (463 comments)

I guess I'm not sure I understand what you're complaining about. We already spend tons of money on flu mass-vaccinations, anti-smoking campaigns, cancer research, etc. Nobody's saying that we should stop these in favor of ebola hysteria.

And how do researchers really know that it's unlikely that ebola might transfer genes with another pathogen to either make ebola more communicable or to make some other common pathogen more virulent? How is that likelihood measured?

Ebola is highly controllable, for now. Seems to me that we should get on top of this potential threat before it becomes serious.

4 days ago
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Positive Ebola Test In Second Texas Health Worker

Slashdot Parent Re:Just tell me (463 comments)

Contrast this with the 5% - 20% of people in the US who get the flu every year and the 200,000 who are hospitalized with flu-related complications.

I don't understand this "Oh, if you are scared of ebola, why aren't you scared of [insert other ailment that kills $bignum people each year]?" logic. Everyone knows that heart disease and cancer and falling off a ladder kill more Americans than ebola right now. So what?

Right now, ebola is not a serious threat to western countries because: 1. It is not airborne (if someone sneezes across the room, you're not gonna get ebola from it), 2. it is not communicable except when the infected is suffering from symptoms, and the symptoms are so severe that the infected person will land in a hospital very quickly, away from the general populace, and 3. we (supposedly) have protocols in place to prevent an infected person from infecting others once he his hospitalized. Obviously, #3 needs some refinement, but I think we'll see that soon.

The reason that ebola is so scary is that if it mutates to become airborne, it is going to become really, really hard to control. As in, you could get ebola just as easily as you could get the flu. And it's currently spreading like wildfire in West Africa, and in that environment, the virus could make that mutation! That is why we need to get really serious about ebola, really quickly. Not because of what ebola is right now, but because of how deadly it might become.

4 days ago
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If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot Parent Re:AWS losing $2 billion a year? (150 comments)

rtfa

Well, that's pretty shitty advice, now isn't it. TFA says that one analyst estimates a $2B loss over the previous 4 quarters and then just waves its hands and says, "So let’s assume that these estimates are true, and let’s also assume that since Google and Microsoft do not break down cloud services that it is also true for them."

So apparently since one analyst estimates that AWS might have lost $2B over the prior 4 quarters, we can just assume that AWS loses $2B per year, and that Google and Microsoft clouds also suffer similar heavy losses.

That is the sloppiest logic that I've seen all week.

4 days ago
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If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot Parent Re:Local Backups (150 comments)

You might want to check out cloud backup services again. I think you could get by with more like $50 or $60/year these days. I'd include links, but I don't have any specific provider to endorse.

4 days ago
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If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot Parent Re:Local Backups (150 comments)

If your single $100 drive fails, you lose all your data.

No, he doesn't. He loses all of his backup data. In order to lose data, he must have simultaneous failure of both his primary and backup storage.

You might argue that this isn't enough redundancy for your data, but that's neither here nor there. GP is willing to take the risk that both his primary and backup storage might fail simultaneously. This is not an unreasonable cost-benefit tradeoff for many people.

Incidentally, I'm more in alignment with your position on the cost-benefit side. Personally, I keep automatic incremental encrypted backups in S3 because it's cheap and easy. I don't have to think about when the last time I rotated my hard drives was. I don't have to think about the last time I ran a backup. I just want my data backed up for me and have it be there for me when I need it most, and S3's 99.whatever% durability gives me peace of mind.

4 days ago
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Oracle Database Certifications Are No Longer Permanent

Slashdot Parent Re:Not a great loss... (108 comments)

I'm not a database guy, but can't you rewrite a right join to be a left join, in the general case?

4 days ago
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If Your Cloud Vendor Goes Out of Business, Are You Ready?

Slashdot Parent Re:AWS losing $2 billion a year? (150 comments)

Good luck finding a citation for that, because that $2B number came directly out of someone's posterior. Amazon has long frustrated investors by not breaking out revenue numbers for AWS. Instead, they lump AWS in with all of Amazon's other side businesses as "other revenue".

No one outside of Amazon has a solid P&L for AWS.

4 days ago
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The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

Slashdot Parent Re:Straw Man (622 comments)

IFF she took the risk knowingly, she reasonably cannot be mad that someone hacked because reasonable people who take risks don't blame others when they get unlucky.

I think that this is where we disagree and probably will never agree.

From my point of view, if someone is driving recklessly/illegally and hits me while I'm on my bike, I certainly will be pissed and blame that person for his/her negligence. Based on this, I think it's fair of Lawrence to be pissed and blame the unknown person who hacked her iCloud account (definitely illegal) and distributed private photos of her (probably a copyright violation). In both cases, the negative outcome was due to someone else's illegal and immoral behavior. This was not due to an accident like your examples were (bungee jumping, surgery complications, etc.)

Sure, we both could have prevented our respective negative outcomes. But just as I wouldn't want someone to visit me in the hospital and tell me I shouldn't have been riding a bike, I'm not prepared to tell Lawrence that she shouldn't sext with a romantic partner. And this is coming from someone who does not personally sext.

5 days ago
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The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

Slashdot Parent Re:Straw Man (622 comments)

We know Lawrence took a stupid risk - we are not blaming her for getting unlucky - we are blaming her for taking the risk which was not worth it from our point of view. And if it was worth it from her point of view, she shouldn't be complaining.

How does the fact that she is complaining about it make it a stupid risk? What if I was riding my bike and some soccer mom was simultaneously texting, applying eye makeup, and screaming at her kids while driving, swerved her minivan into me and hit me, can't I complain that she was not paying attention to the road, driving in violation of several traffic laws? Because I can tell you right now that I would complain about her actions in such a scenario.

And so why can't Lawrence be mad that someone hacked her iCloud account and leaked obviously private photos of her to the public?

If you're not prepared to tell me that I'm stupid for riding my bike, then why are you so quick to say that Lawrence is stupid for sexting with her boyfriend?

5 days ago
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The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

Slashdot Parent Re:Straw Man (622 comments)

Right, but that's still not what happened here, and bringing it up in this case is both TMI and prevarication.

TMI? All I said was that I was present in a hot tub without the benefit of a swimsuit. If you imputed anything other than "he was relaxing, minding his own business" into my statement, then that is your own wild imagination getting carried away. Anyway, if the above was too much info about me for your liking, you have my express invitation to mentally substitute the words "someone who I know very well" in place of "I" in my example.

Also, your accusation of prevarication is unfounded. My having brought up the incident where I was photographed without my permission was in response to gandhi_2, when he said, "Do not allow those photos to be taken. Do not allow them to exist." My response is that's not always possible to maintain 100% vigilance 24/7/365 for the entire duration of your life, and that you often can't control the actions of others. To be clear, my response was never in reference to Jennifer Lawrence and the leak of her nude photographs. Neither was it in reference to the snapchat photo leaks.

It's still true that if you don't want people to see naked pictures of you that you shouldn't take them, and if you must take them then you must keep them safely hidden away.

And this is exactly what OP was disagreeing with, and for once, I think Hazelton got it right.

Here's a better example: I've gone skydiving (fully clothed!). People sometimes die skydiving. Just as Lawrence did not want her nude photos to be leaked to the public, neither did I wish to die skydiving, yet I dove anyway. What possessed me to do such a stupid thing as skydiving if I was not comfortable with the idea of being killed in the process? The same calculation that Lawrence made: Expected Benefit > (Potential Negative Outcome * Likelihood of Negative Outcome). I knew that skydiving was going to be a lot of fun (it was), and that the likelihood of death was very very small (I survived). And so I went through with the skydive, despite the inherent risk in having done so.

Likewise, Lawrence wanted the cheap thrill of sending nudie pics to her boyfriend. Maybe she's an exhibitionist (she is an actress after all, so not so far fetched). Maybe was convinced to send the pics against her better judgment. Maybe she's telling the truth that she sent them to her boyfriend as a substitute for porn (as though grainy pics of boobs constitute porn in 2014 and as though she didn't have enough money to fly to wherever her long-distance boyfriend was and have intimate relations with him in-person). It doesn't matter. It's none of my business. But what we do know is that for her, Expected Benefit > (Potential Negative Outcome * Likelihood of Negative Outcome). Unfortunately for her, she was the unlucky one who got the negative outcome.

But that doesn't mean she's stupid, any more than I would have been considered stupid had my skydive ended in tragedy. The bad outcome has to happen to someone, and in this case, she was the unlucky one. Perhaps she didn't understand the risks, and I wouldn't necessarily fault her for that. Apple always claims that their iCloud is totally secure, and they continue to make these claims despite grainy proof to the contrary. You and I know better, but she probably knows more about acting than we do. Nobody can be a master of all trades.

Personally, I wouldn't be surprised if she knew the risks and did it anyway for the thrill of it. And we can't really say that she made a bad decision just because hindsight showed that she happened to have been unlucky.

And I agree with you that the disclosure of naughty pictures should be a nonevent. Because, yeah. It's 2014.

about a week ago
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The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

Slashdot Parent Re:Straw Man (622 comments)

Well, you can do a lot if you would stop frequenting orgies and stripping to the buff in the middle of the public library...

So... why shouldn't I be able to frequent an orgy and have a reasonable expectation that some drunken jackass won't take my picture? I mean, as long as everyone uses protection, seriously, what's wrong with an orgy?

I can only think of 2 places where I strip down to my birthday suit, and both of them are in my own house.

There are only a few places that I get naked on a regular basis: my home, and the gym locker room. But it's not like I've never been naked outside just for the thrill of it. Hell, even my straitlaced, nerdy wife went streaking once in college. I don't think it's reasonable to think that people will never, ever, ever be naked outside of their own homes.

about a week ago
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The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

Slashdot Parent Re:Straw Man (622 comments)

But haven't you noticed that cheap thrills are fun? And in the end, aren't most of them pretty harmless? Or shouldn't they be?

I've done "soft" drugs, drank to excess, gone skydiving, bungee jumping, and things like that. All of these carry a small risk of a large disaster. Was I stupid to have done those? Or, like OP said, did I make a calculated risk, that the Thrill of jumping out of a plane would exceed Potential Disaster x Likelihood Of Disaster? Lawrence made that same calculation and came up on the losing end, but does that make her decision unwise, just because she was unlucky?

I've had unwanted nude photos taken of me in a hot tub by a drunken jackass (and he wouldn't dispute that characterization of himself). This shit happens sometimes. I don't really care that much about it, but given the choice, I'd rather that the photos not exist.

about a week ago
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The Correct Response To Photo Hack Victim-Blamers

Slashdot Parent Re:Straw Man (622 comments)

if you don't want people to see those photos, don't take those photos. Do not allow those photos to be taken. Do not allow them to exist.

I'd like to agree with you that it's that simple, I really would. But with the ubiquity of cellphone cameras, a lot of people find the thrill to be difficult to resist. Your advice would certainly be effective, but isn't it akin to telling teenagers to abstain from sex in order to protect themselves from STIs and pregnancy? What percentage of teens will follow this advice?

And your advice also relies on controlling the actions of others, which is notoriously difficult to accomplish with 100% effectiveness. Unless you make yourself crazy ensuring that you never appear naked near anyone who might have a camera (and everyone has a camera these days), you can't really guarantee that this will work. All it takes is a few seconds and whoops! Your photo is taken. Can you really prevent that 24/7/365 for every day of your life?

Hopefully, one day, people will chill the hell out about nakedness. I mean, we all have bodies. We're all naked from time to time. Why does this need to be such a big deal?

about a week ago
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Despite Push From Tech Giants, AP CS Exam Counts Don't Budge Much In Most States

Slashdot Parent Re:For the love of god... (144 comments)

Sample size of 1, but my wife absolutely refused to do any type of programming when she graduated college. And it's not like she couldn't have learned, considering her math and science background. She just hated programming, and that was that.

about a week ago
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Despite Push From Tech Giants, AP CS Exam Counts Don't Budge Much In Most States

Slashdot Parent Re:what if there was a better monetary incentive (144 comments)

I interned at IBM and I made more than the salaried folks because I got paid overtime and I was non-exampt.

IBM underpays.

about a week ago

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