Beta

Comments

top

Why Bad Jobs (or No Jobs) Happen To Good Workers

Sosetta Re: O RLY? (1201 comments)

"skill shortage"

Can you design a scenario where there isn't a skill shortage? If there were a million people with the required skill set living in an apartment building across the street from your business, and they were all willing to work for $30,000 a year, you would immediately add more requirements to the skill set, or you would offer them a salary of $29,000 a year, or both. If that didn't reduce the pool of qualified applicants enough, you would drop the salary further and up the requirements further until you had a small pool of qualified applicants. Then you would complain about the lack of qualified applicants.

"good software developers"

I'd be willing to bet that you require proof of this through a successful project or two. You're not hiring people out of college, and you don't have projects that can ramp up their skills to be what you want. So the people that you want have to be currently employed by someone else doing exactly what you want them to do. Tell me again why they want to work for you?

I have a B.S. in math. I have years of programming experience. I've passed a few actuarial exams. I drive a taxi for a living.

more than 2 years ago
top

Teacher Suspended For Reading Ender's Game To Students

Sosetta And you wonder why there are no good teachers. (1054 comments)

In Colorado, the state legislature did away with tenure for elementary-middle-high school teachers. You don't get to argue for more pay, since it's just based on your level of education (B.S or M.S), and # of hours you've taken above your last degree, but you can never have true job security.

Why would anyone do a job where any idiot parent can raise a stink over something stupid, and you get fired for it? Seriously, in Office Space, the main character had 8 bosses, and that was considered ridiculous. For the average teacher, they have 150 bosses, and the bosses change every year. You wonder why all the teachers that stay never do anything for fear of doing something that someone will find offensive.

more than 2 years ago
top

SFPD Breathalyzer Mistake Puts Hundreds of DUI Convictions In Doubt

Sosetta Re:Having worked with officers in that area before (498 comments)

A judge in New Mexico can have your Jersey license suspended. They undoubtedly will, and you'll find out about it in a few years when you get pulled over for something really minor and end up going to jail for driving with a suspended license.

more than 2 years ago
top

Deep-sea Camouflage Tactics Revealed

Sosetta Re:Squid are doing it for themselves (61 comments)

I have now officially read my first article by a squid geek. Your post is so full of information that it qualifies as an article.

Well done, sir, well done.

about 3 years ago
top

US Student Loans Exceed $1 Trillion

Sosetta Re:Banks not to blame for this (917 comments)

"Might be the case that the easy credit allowed colleges to push up their tuition knowing students could take out loans"

This is exactly the case. Would you extend a loan to someone for $40,000 to allow them to get a job making $28,000 a year (instead of $24,000?). If you could charge them 7% interest and have it be guaranteed by the government (which means you take NO risk) you sure would.

The housing bubble happened because Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac would buy any home loan no matter how bad it was. So, as a bank, even though you know someone will never be able to afford the payments, you make the loan knowing you can sell it off immediately and make a profit with no risk. In fact, you'd be shirking your fiduciary responsibility to NOT make the loan, since it makes money for your bank.

more than 3 years ago
top

Nevada Authorizes Development of Driverless Car Rules

Sosetta Re:How much lower could speeds go? (122 comments)

I've seen what happens when drivers are not selfish. Two lanes approach a stoplight. Most of the traffic wants to turn right, and can do so even if the light is red, but the "not selfish" driver who doesn't pay attention to the fact that there's another lane (with no cars in it) ends up sitting at the front of the overly-full lane, stopping traffic flow.

more than 3 years ago
top

When it comes to jury service, I ...

Sosetta Foreman, double murder (528 comments)

We decided the defendant was guilty of one count of first degree and one of second degree murder.

more than 3 years ago
top

Favorite Sony Gaffe?

Sosetta Re:PS3 backwards compatibility (329 comments)

I was too. I'm very unhappy that I have to keep a second player around for the PS/2 games

more than 3 years ago
top

Requiring Algebra II In High School Gains Momentum

Sosetta Requiring it won't change ANYTHING. (490 comments)

The school where I taught math had a strong department of math teachers.

Algebra II was required. But it didn't mean anything. If a student can't pass the class, they just talk to their counselor, and get moved into a computer-math class, which doesn't require anywhere close to the same level of understanding.

The fact that a student can't (or won't) pass a particular math class will not prevent them from graduating high school. There are too many alternate paths.

I think it would be a very good thing if everyone DID understand the material in an Algebra II class, but I don't see it happening. Locally, at least 10% of the adult population never passed Algebra I.

more than 3 years ago
top

Requiring Algebra II In High School Gains Momentum

Sosetta Re:Just algebra? (490 comments)

Algebra II == College Algebra, depending on how dumbed-down the college algebra course is. If you're taking it in high school, and it doesn't involve group theory, then it's Algebra II.

more than 3 years ago
top

Gates' Future of Education Straight Out of '60s

Sosetta Re:Clueless about PLATO (203 comments)

PLATO was a fantastic educational system, and still is.

I've seen it in use in computer-based classrooms for students that have failed in traditional settings. A student who struggles to learn can blame their failures on the teacher. Such a student will often behave in a manner counterproductive to their own success, just to have an affect on said teacher. You can't get a rise out of a computer, however. So you end up having to blame only yourself.

The original touch-screens ended up with a lot of lessons that accurately explained a large number of concepts. One of the problems with traditional textbooks is that they don't have a time axis. PLATO lessons can show you things as they happen, walking you through all the steps yourself. They can correct you along the way, so that you can learn to do the problems yourself. None of this is stuff that CAN'T be done with HTML and scripting, but PLATO came first, and did a really good job.

more than 3 years ago
top

Feds Settle Case of Woman Fired Over Facebook Posts

Sosetta Re:Ruling doesn't affect Internet blocking (316 comments)

You can ask out a co-worker, or subordinate, as long as if they say "no", that's the end of it, and you don't pursue it. You're not creating a hostile work environment, or anything like that. It's just when there's a pattern of continued requests (even after rejections) that you expose yourself to winnable lawsuits.

more than 3 years ago
top

Tron: Legacy — Too Much Imagination Required?

Sosetta I think many people missed the point. (429 comments)

The point of TRON:Legacy was the same as the original TRON: Wouldn't it be cool to actually BE inside the computer where you could interact in a meaningful and tactile way with computer programs (that weren't designed to have a 3D representation).

The graphics were nice, especially if you paid for the IMAX 3D experience. I thought they provided the same role as in Avatar: stun the audience into not noticing the plot.

The plot wasn't the point of TRON. The graphics, while nice, weren't the point of TRON. The idea of physically interacting with arbitrary computer programs directly was the point. It's "cool" and "neat" almost because it's impossible and ludicrous.
 

more than 3 years ago
top

Statistical Analysis of Terrorism

Sosetta I disagree with the conclusion (265 comments)

If terrorism follows the power law, then that actually just confirms that terrorism is as random as sunspots and global earthquakes.

It's random. Nothing to see here.

more than 3 years ago
top

Annual power consumption at your residence?

Sosetta Re:the calculation (507 comments)

Your wife handles all the bills too, then?

more than 3 years ago
top

A Nude Awakening — the TSA and Privacy

Sosetta Re:Some People (728 comments)

The difference in the post 9/11 world is what kinds of hijacking get what kind of response.

If there's a terrorist who takes a passenger hostage to get the pilots to fly to an alternate destination, they'll probably get to their destination: preserving human life is worth a little inconvenience. If the terrorist wants to actually physically take control of the plane, then you (as a passenger) are going to die anyway, so it might be worth the sacrifice. As a parent who travels with a little one, I'd not-so-happily but enthusiastically sacrifice myself in the hope that my child won't die.

If, however, some people just direct (direct might be too gentle a word, perhaps "threaten the life of another passenger if demands are not met" would be better) the pilot to land at a different airport, then my doing something rash would not help protect my child.

more than 3 years ago
top

TSA Saw My Junk, Missed Razor Blades, Says Adam Savage

Sosetta Re:TSA Security Theater (609 comments)

"...it would be so onerous that it might finally provoke some kind of sizeable backlash against the whole pointless process."

Which is exactly what the virtual strip search is doing now.

about 4 years ago
top

Would You Take a One-Way Ticket To Mars?

Sosetta Re:Yes, even if it kills me (561 comments)

When I compliment another child's behavior to their parents, I'm really complimenting the parents' parenting skills. When someone tells me my daughter is so nice, I take it as a direct compliment to me.

There's both nature and nurture involved.

about 4 years ago
top

Firefighters Let House Burn Because Owner Didn't Pay Fee

Sosetta Re:Nope, not kidding. (2058 comments)

"Pay your service fees if you wish to receive your service. It's a win-win."

Are you nuts? What if all of government did this? Want police? Pay up front. Want to call 911? That's $5 a minute. Want to drive on the road? Charged by the mile via GPS. Want your kids to go to school? All schools charge, public schools don't exist. Want to walk on the sidewalk? Toll sidewalks every 100 yards.

The situation here isn't a pay-as-you-go situation is a pay-for-access situation. I don't pay each time I need police service, I pay a flat fee (i.e. taxes) for access to as much police service as I need. Same goes for all the other stuff. I've never called 911, but I still happily pay for the service to exist.

To be honest, if you expect your house to catch fire more than once every 1000 years, then the $75/year fee is a win for you if your house is worth at least $75,000. The long and short of it is that the homeowner in this situation is a COMPLETE MORON with no sense of where the services that make up society come from and the fact that these services must be paid for.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

Sosetta hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

Sosetta has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?