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The $200,000 Software Developer

SparkEE Re:Contractor (473 comments)

Remember to compare that $623/month against what you're currently really paying. Most companies do not provide medical coverage to employees completely free, there is some money taken out of your paycheck pre-tax for your contribution. This can easily be between $200 and $500 depending on the company and your elections.

about a year ago
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GPS Spoofing Attack Hacks Drones

SparkEE Re:but military drones don't use unencrypted signa (214 comments)

The problem with the ever-increasing timestamp concept is that it doesn't account for multi-path issues. I thinks the GP's idea of replay is to do it quick enough that it looks like a stronger multi-path version of the signal. However, there are two problems with that I see. 1. Without being able to decrypt the original message and encrypt a new one, I don't see how one would do the replay with any use. 2. Even if you did have the ability to decrypt and encrypt, it would take far too long to do all that an re-transmit in time to fit in the multi-path search window. GP said you could do this without knowing the actual meaning of the signal. I'm not sure what that would accomplish other than either amplifying the signal, or jamming it.

about 2 years ago
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The Shoddy State of Automotive Wireless Security

SparkEE Re:Lets skip to the heart of the matter (260 comments)

Not true, the system still notices. The system gets calibrated when the tires are filled up by a competent driver initializing calibration through a simple 22 step process done entirely be a single button and a 2-line dashboard display. It's even written down in the manual that I'm sure every driver reads before operating a vehicle. The proper tire speed to engine speed is then stored in the computer over the next few miles of driving. After that point, any/all tire deflation will be noticed.

more than 3 years ago
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Android Data Stealing App Downloaded By Millions

SparkEE Re:I'm confused... (335 comments)

You list what permissions your app will need up front in the manifest. If your app then tries to do something that wasn't in that manifest, it won't be able to, because it doesn't have the permission. If Mr Malwharightar tries to be sneaky and omit a permission to make phone calls, then the code will not be able to make phone calls. I don't see the flaw.

more than 3 years ago
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Catching Satnav Errors On Google Street View

SparkEE Re:Swing and a miss... (312 comments)

Oh, I see. I stand corrected.

I came to my conclusion by making ill-founded assumptions and then using a single data point that appeared to back me up.

What a strange area to try to drive in.

about 4 years ago
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Catching Satnav Errors On Google Street View

SparkEE Re:Swing and a miss... (312 comments)

There's actually nothing wrong with the route google shows there. First, you put the end point there, implying you actually want to get there. Second, there are parked cars in that street view, so apparently you can drive down that road for the purpose of parking (say, like when you tell google that your destination is on that street).

If you move the end point anywhere else, google routes you around that street. Ask it to take you to Oak St east of Octavia Blvd, and google takes you down Laguna St.

about 4 years ago
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Microsoft Talks Back To Google's Security Claims

SparkEE Re:Some Helpful Advise (528 comments)

Doesn't the caching only apply to the single process ? It's not like you can have some background task running waiting for a sudo, or am mistaken there?

more than 4 years ago
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Obama To Decide On New Weapons

SparkEE Re:Do you work on weapons? (409 comments)

As an EE, I've had a couple jobs where I worked on weapons. In fact, I've worked on the Conventional Trident Modification program referenced by TFA. It can be a bit of a struggle to deal with the fact that you're building a weapon. There's one rational that got tossed around quite a bit:

The weapons will be built by someone. Would you really want the weapon design to fall only to engineers that couldn't get other jobs? Given that I worked on the guidance parts, I could be glad that I was involved in making sure the weapon only went where it was intended to go.

Granted, that first part is a bit of a strawman, but it's based in the reality that not all engineers will ever stop working on weapons.

In the past, I've also worked on a torpedo project. That was a bit easier since torpedos are rarely used against anything other than a naval vessel, especially the MK48. Missiles are definitely more taxing on moral. Also, the fact that you're working on a weapon was always present for me and affected every single design decision. I wish I could say the same seemed true for the management. I'm not sure how many times I said things like "We're building a damn missile here, how about we double check that?"

more than 4 years ago
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What Can Be Done About Security of Debit Cards?

SparkEE Re:What can be done? Nothing. (511 comments)

Does anyone really rely on what's in the square brackets or tooltip window? In most browsers (The three I use anyway) hovering over a link displays the URL in the status bar.

more than 4 years ago
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US DOJ Says Kindle In Classroom Hurts Blind Students

SparkEE Re:Ebooks not the problem, kindle navigation is (492 comments)

However, a Braille book has Braille page numbers in the same spot on every page, so it is actually easier to navigate. There are regulations in place for publishers that make sure text books are available in Braille.

When moving to e-books, there is no guarantee a printed book exists in any form. University are claiming this is okay, citing that printed Braille books are not necessary due to the text-to-speech feature of the Kindle. If it were not for the lack of text-to-speech for navigation, this would be true.

more than 4 years ago
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Google Visual Search Coming Soon to Android

SparkEE Re:Great Idea, but... (111 comments)

In the video, a user takes a picture of the sign at Santa Monica Pier and gets a search result. Seems like it would be practical and quicker to have location based information available. Right now I can open up Google maps, hit "My Location", Tap on the building for Santa Monica Pier, and I get it's address. They should just add an option there to do a search. No camera needed, which also means it will work at night.

more than 4 years ago
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In Test, Windows 7 Vulnerable To 8 Out of 10 Viruses

SparkEE Re:Not suprising (843 comments)

I believe the GP meant they=MS, not they=Sophos

more than 4 years ago
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TomTom Releases iPhone Navigation App

SparkEE Re:!GPS (289 comments)

Triangulation also reduces the time-to-first-fix by reducing the search space the GPS chip has to run correlations in, and by usually by sending up-to-date ephemeral data, which takes 15 minutes to download from the satellites.

more than 4 years ago
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TomTom Releases iPhone Navigation App

SparkEE Re:Will there be an adroid version? (289 comments)

TeleNav makes an App for the G1. I've been using it for about 4 months now since it came out. It's free to download and try for 30 days. Then it's a subscription service, costing $10 per month. I've been quite happy with it and consider it well worth the $10.

more than 4 years ago
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SoftMaker Office 2008 vs. OpenOffice.org 3.1

SparkEE Re:What timing (214 comments)

Does the competition actually require you to send in your plan as a .doc file? You should be able to send it in as a pdf or postscript.

It just always really irks me that people ask for finished documents in an editor's format. If people would just stop having this dumb expection, then it wouldn't matter if my tool of choice was Word, Ooo, Pages, Correl, html, or LaTex. They're all able to send out postscript files, and usually able to generate pdf these days.

The only time .doc files should be getting sent around is within a single team or corporation, where you have a reasonable expection that your coworkers have the same program available that you do.

about 5 years ago
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Intel Demos Wireless "Resonant" Recharging

SparkEE Re:Already have wireless power.... (184 comments)

I expect that you will want to transfer energy more rapidly to your car than enough to power a single speaker. For more power at similar range, you will probably need a bigger antenna.

(And 20% power loss from transmitter to receiver is pretty horrible efficiency.)

Quite true, but I personally have no idea how this technology scales. I wouldn't automatically assume that the antenna size needs to grow with power throughput. If I were to assume anything, I would assume antenna size is a function of the frequency being used. Perhaps that frequency is a function of power throughput though.

So could a having a cable with a a cable reel and a fixed, locked cabinet, which would also give you a lot better transfer efficiency and capacity than this seems to offer.

Yes, that's also true. However, I personally think that anything that would make plug-in electrics more convenient would help the adoption rate, and thus is worth investigating. I don't think many people really welcome the idea of having to wind up the cable from the car when it's pouring rain and/or they're running late for work.

more than 5 years ago
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Intel Demos Wireless "Resonant" Recharging

SparkEE Re:Already have wireless power.... (184 comments)

Well then, screw mobile device. How about using this to recharge electric vehicles? A 12-inch coil is no big deal in an automobile. I could see this being useful in something like the Volt or Circuit. You could install the larger coil at home and recharge your car without having to hook up a cable. It would be great for people without the luxury of a garage, and could mitigate the risks of a high power cable laying around outside all day.

Even better, business could install the large coils and have special parking spaces that recharge the employees' or customers' cars during the day.

more than 5 years ago
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Apple Freezes Snow Leopard APIs

SparkEE Re:Why rush to use all the cores? (256 comments)

Of course, you can tell 7+ how much ram to use (same as photoshop), but in my experience these applications willfully ignore user input and treat the machine they're running on as if it exists for that application and that application only.

But, that's supposed to be the entire point of the OS. It's fundamental job it to make the application think it's the only thing running on the machine. If the OS is letting an application use so many resources that other applications do not run correctly, then it's the OS that is to blame and not the application. Let's not go backwards by abandoning preemtive multitasking for cooperative multitasking, which is what you imply with "knows how to share".

more than 5 years ago
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Circuit Board Design For a Small Startup?

SparkEE Re:Lotsa good and horrible advice above (262 comments)

There's no reason all those EEs you mention can't be the same person, unless you're hiring someone with less than a few years experience, or has worked only in a large company all his career. There are many small (1 or 2 people) design firms that have the expertise to see a design from concept to production.

Find a local design consultant, someone relatively senior in experience. Let that person worry about finding a PCB house for prototypes and small-scale production. If the product is successfull, and the small-scale run sells, then hire someone on full-time to manage the large-scale production.

more than 5 years ago
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MIT Team Creates Shock That Recharges Your Car

SparkEE Re:In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamic (281 comments)

Just to nit-pick here. Since you're assuming normal shocks would also need to be replaced every 10 years, the $600 to $900 figure is the incremental cost they need to stay under. If a set of these is $500 more than the cost of regular shocks, it's a win.

more than 5 years ago

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