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Comments

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Snowden Seeks To Develop Anti-Surveillance Technologies

SpzToid This could totally work out (129 comments)

Edward Snowden certainly has name recognition in the security space, which in branding terms equals big money. He's got his share of wild and crazy times overseas doing various hijinx not always on the up and up, sorta just like other security specialists of an earlier generation. Sure, in terms of branding alone Snowden could easily become the next McAfee, and he's still very young!

And isn't as if they weren't both wanted on international warrants either; and street cred. does sell sneakers.

about a week ago
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New Mayhem Malware Targets Linux and UNIX-Like Servers

SpzToid Re:Derp (167 comments)

Here's the link to the blog post, that didn't make it into my previous reply: https://www.adayinthelifeof.nl.... It clarifies several reasons for using the standard port 22 for ssh.

about a week ago
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New Mayhem Malware Targets Linux and UNIX-Like Servers

SpzToid Re:Derp (167 comments)

Yes, you are right and I stand corrected. In fact late yesterday, I happened upon a blog post teaching me the same explanation you gave me just now:

when we start SSH on port 22, we know for a fact that this is done by root or a root-process since no other user could possibly open that port. But what happens when we move SSH to port 2222? This port can be opened without a privileged account, which means I can write a simple script that listens to port 2222 and mimics SSH in order to capture your passwords. And this can easily be done with simple tools commonly available on every linux system/server. So running SSH on a non-privileged port makes it potentially LESS secure, not MORE.

Thank you for your important clarification regarding my security practices.

about a week ago
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New Mayhem Malware Targets Linux and UNIX-Like Servers

SpzToid Re:Derp (167 comments)

Start your security process by not using port 22 for ssh, and instead using some random, legal 5-digit port number. Then block IPs from anyone doing a port scan. Also, setup port-knocking prior to any authorized user even starting to login using ssh. Of course certificates should only be used, not passwords for authorization. That should go a long way to keep the bad guys out.

Also bots tend to have the same user-agent strings, which tend to be obscure in and amongst themselves. These obscure, identifying user-agents can also be blocked, once identified.

To read and actually make sense of machine logs, the free ELK Stack rocks! Here's a guide to setup your own machine, for the purpose of reading logs in a very user-friendly way.

about two weeks ago
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Malaysian Passenger Plane Reportedly Shot Down Over Ukraine

SpzToid Re:Those bloody sepratists! (752 comments)

Replying to myself here. I was being sarcastic dammit. 'Separatists', in the most-classic sense, typically don't have such sophisticated weaponry or manpower at their disposal, when they 'rebel'. Duh.

I even cited with photos of what a BUK missile battery looks like. Please don't think I'm some sort of anarchist, okay?

about two weeks ago
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Malaysian Passenger Plane Reportedly Shot Down Over Ukraine

SpzToid Re:Why fly over a war zone? (752 comments)

Up until this period of time, airspace at that altitude, over this region, wasn't in any way shape or form considered to be a war-zone, I can assure you. Or else that commercial flight would not have been there in the first place. I do not believe this particular international commercial flight up there was something like an isolated event either. Now your point in retrospect perhaps...

about two weeks ago
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Malaysian Passenger Plane Reportedly Shot Down Over Ukraine

SpzToid Those bloody sepratists! (752 comments)

That rag tag militia got lucky it seems, with a direct hit no less. Those light ammunitions gathered from round the house, what the odd Klashnikov and what have you.

Speculation at this point is this is what those rag-taggers managed to bring it down with: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/new...

about two weeks ago
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Comcast Customer Service Rep Just Won't Take No For an Answer

SpzToid Re:105 megabits per second (401 comments)

TFA says he's a producer at AOL. Seeing as how he's an AOL employee, he probably needs a lot more bandwidth than you do, as you're someone who probably just works in I.T. Go figure. I don't understand anything about AOL either.

Obviously he needs way more bandwidth than he can get via an (AOL) dial-up modem, which explains why he's been with Comcast for the last 9 years.

Someone that works from home might opt for a larger package to obtain greater uploading bandwidth. I did that to advance from 1.5 to 6 Mbps recently myself, and I'm glad I did.

Maybe this is just AOL picking a Telecom fight with Comcast. Seriously, since when is it ever legal to record a call like this? But I suppose it becomes legal when you're on hold and the recording played to you says they'll record you first.

about two weeks ago
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Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

SpzToid Re:H1B (300 comments)

This New York Times article states he arrived to work at Microsoft, from Hyderabad, India in 1992. It says nothing about any initial H1b status of his. Obviously he lives in America now.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02...

about two weeks ago
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Obama Administration Says the World's Servers Are Ours

SpzToid Re: Maybe, maybe not. (749 comments)

No, you're only fixated on bandwidth available, as afforded, for example, by a station-wagon hurtling down the highway. Here, let me help you with some citations to exactly what I am talking about:
http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=stati...

about two weeks ago
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Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

SpzToid Re:Dropping the Xbox? (300 comments)

Lenovo, Asus, or Acer might pick it up if Samsung takes a pass. Think about all those Asian gamers and their hardware requirements. But I agree with you regarding Google, and then somehow it'll become more developer friendly too.

Because if Google feels it worthwhile to publish a smartphone-api/cardboard-cutout-kit/virtual-reality-display, they could probably manage XBox too.

about two weeks ago
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Obama Administration Says the World's Servers Are Ours

SpzToid Re: Maybe, maybe not. (749 comments)

Haven't you ever noticed where the tubes connect to the cloud? I could diagram it for you if you'd like.

about two weeks ago
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Bot Tweets Anonymous Wikipedia Edits From Capitol Hill

SpzToid Re:Also available for UK, Canada, France ... (95 comments)

The few that I checked out, were all clarifying legitimate typos. This is an excellent tool, to be able to monitor such, with precision like this. If only we could get this tool into OpenSSL or some derivative of OpenSSL, etc., somehow.

FWIW, this is the first useful thing I've personally seen Twitter used for. But like everything I see in Twitter, there is redundancy in plained old, un-walled-garden rss publishing, (with no 140K limit!)

about two weeks ago
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How Google Map Hackers Can Destroy a Business

SpzToid Re:those damn locksmiths (132 comments)

Wish I had mod points right now!

about two weeks ago
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Senator Al Franken Accuses AT&T of "Skirting" Net Neutrality Rules

SpzToid Re: No Funding for you then. (81 comments)

So were talking something of a margin of victory like 600 - 900 votes this time around? That still ain't a whole lot. He only won by 312 votes the first time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

about two weeks ago
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Senator Al Franken Accuses AT&T of "Skirting" Net Neutrality Rules

SpzToid Re:No Funding for you then. (81 comments)

What does it mean that Comcast gave him money for his first election? Had Franken actually declared war on the Comcast/NBC merger while he was campaigning? GM/NBC was even his former employer at Saturday Night Live. Maybe Comcast just wanted to get on his good side at the time, like his other donors?

But the next election might be something different. And even if Comcast gave him $10k, they'll give the other guy 20k, (so 30K paid out overall) with 20K just the cost of doing business in order to pump up their real pick with a 10K advantage. Don't forget Comcast Corp has a right to Freedom of Speech and can't be sooo restricted financially.

about two weeks ago
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Senator Al Franken Accuses AT&T of "Skirting" Net Neutrality Rules

SpzToid Re:No Funding for you then. (81 comments)

OK, I get your point, but what about the money ATT, Verizon, Comcast, etc. will be pumping into his opponent?

about two weeks ago
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Senator Al Franken Accuses AT&T of "Skirting" Net Neutrality Rules

SpzToid No Funding for you then. (81 comments)

Guess who won't be receiving much, if any campaign contributions for the next election from ATT? (Or Verizon, or Comcast).

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Cable TV boxes are the 2nd biggest energy users in many homes

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  about a month ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "224 million U.S. cable TV set-top boxes combined consume as much electricity as produced by four giant nuclear reactors, running around the clock. They have become the biggest single energy user in many homes, apart from air conditioning.

Cheryl Williamsen, a Los Alamitos architect, has three of the boxes leased from her cable provider in her home, but she had no idea how much power they consumed until recently, when she saw a rating on the back for as much as 500 watts — about the same as a washing machine.

A typical set-top cable box with a digital recorder can consume as much as 35 watts of power, costing about $8 a month for a typical Southern California consumer. And the devices use nearly as much power turned off as they do when they are turned on."

Link to Original Source
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NY Times: Plaintiff Maligns Class-action Deal to Judge in Silicon Valley Suit

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  about 3 months ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "Apple has more than $150 billion in the bank, eclipsing the combined cash reserves of Israel and Britain. Google, Intel and Adobe have a total of about $80 billion stored up for a rainy day.

Against such tremendous cash hoards, $324 million is chump change. But that is what the four technology companies have agreed to pay to settle a class action brought by their own employees.

The suit, which was on track to go to trial in San Jose, Calif., at the end of May, promised weeks if not months of damaging revelations about how Silicon Valley executives conspired to suppress wages and limit competition. Details of the settlement are still under wraps.

“The class wants a chance at real justice,” he wrote. “We want our day in court.”

He noted that the settlement amount was about one-tenth of the estimated $3 billion lost in compensation by the 64,000 class members. In a successful trial, antitrust laws would triple that sum.

“As an analogy,” Mr. Devine wrote, “if a shoplifter is caught on video stealing a $400 iPad from the Apple Store, would a fair and just resolution be for the shoplifter to pay Apple $40, keep the iPad, and walk away with no record or admission of wrongdoing? Of course not.”

“If the other class members join me in opposition, I believe we will be successful in convincing the court to give us our due process,” Mr. Devine said in an interview on Sunday. He has set up a website, Tech Worker Justice, and is looking for legal representation. Any challenge will take many months. The other three class representatives could not be reached for comment over the weekend."

Link to Original Source
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Astronuat Dale Gardner has died at age 65 after suffering a hemorrhagic stroke

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  about 5 months ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "Dale Gardner flew on two shuttles missions and took two spacewalks. During the 1984 spacewalk he helped grab a stranded satellite and stuck it into the bay of the space shuttle."
Link to Original Source
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U.S. D.O.J. implicates Apple, Google, Intel, and others, in no-hire consipracy

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  about a year and a half ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "Emails to and from the late Steve Jobs may show that several tech companies adopted a "no-hire" policy in which they agreed not to recruit one another's top talent.

The emails were made public Tuesday by a United States federal judge presiding over a lawsuit filed by tech workers against several Silicon Valley tech companies, including Apple, Google and Intel.

"I'm sure you realize the asymmetry in the financial resources of our respective companies," Jobs says in the email.

In another email that seems to be related to "no-hire" policies, Google's then-CEO Eric Schmidt told another Google employee to communicate orally rather than in writing because "I don't want to create a paper trail over which we can be sued later."

Just nice people doing 'nice' things to others, less fortunate and trying compete. /rant

http://www.theverge.com/2013/1/23/3906374/email-exhibits-in-silicon-valley-no-hire-case"

Link to Original Source
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Kim Jong Un is People's Daily choice for the sexiest man alive in 2012!

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  about a year ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "Kim Jong Un is 2012 the sexiest man alive according to People's Daily, which apparently was influenced by an earlier article in The Onion.

Is The People's Press the new People magazine, when it comes to defining which male is most-sexy this year?
http://www.people.com/people/package/0,,20315920,00.html

Hey If Rick Astley can make a 2nd career because of the internet, maybe Kim Jong Un has a chance too. Best of luck."

Link to Original Source
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Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta warns of a possibile "cyber-Pearl Harbor"

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  about 2 years ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta warned Thursday that the United States was facing the possibility of a “cyber-Pearl Harbor” and was increasingly vulnerable to foreign computer hackers who could dismantle the nation’s power grid, transportation system, financial networks and government.

Countries such as Iran are motivated to conduct such attacks, in retaliation actually.

Perhaps old news around here, even though Panetta is in-fact requesting new legislation from congress and the sentate, isn't the message wise and current that "we would be much better served if we accepted that prevention eventually fails, so we need detection, response, and containment for the incidents that will occur." as Richard Bejtlich has argued in his security blog?

Incidentally, Richard has also written a Top 10 list of the best ways to stir up the security pot (http://taosecurity.blogspot.nl/2012/09/top-ten-ways-to-stir-cyber-pot.html):

  If you want to start a debate/argument/flamewar in security, pick any of the following.

        "Full disclosure" vs "responsible disclosure" vs whatever else
        Threat intelligence sharing
        Value of security certifications
        Exploit sales
        Advanced-ness, Persistence-ness, Threat-ness, Chinese-ness of APT
        Reality of "cyberwar"
        "Builders vs Breakers"
        "Security is an engineering problem," i.e., "building a new Internet is the answer."
        "Return on security investment"
        Security by mandate or legislation or regulation

But seriously folks, time do change, don't they? (Even in the technology sector) Currently the congress is preoccupied with the failure of US security threats in Benghazi, while maybe Leon isn't getting the press his recent message deserves?"

Link to Original Source
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US Chamber of Commerce infiltrated by a group in C

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  more than 2 years ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "The Wall Street Journal is now reporting that a group of hackers in China breached the computer defenses of the United States Chamber of Commerce. The intrusion was quietly shut down in May 2010, while FBI investigations continue.

A spokesman for the Chinese Embassy in Washington, Geng Shuang, said cyberattacks are prohibited by Chinese law and China itself is a victim of attacks.

Still, the Chamber continues to see suspicious activity, they say. A thermostat at a town house the Chamber owns on Capitol Hill at one point was communicating with an Internet address in China, they say, and, in March, a printer used by Chamber executives spontaneously started printing pages with Chinese characters."

Link to Original Source
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Nasdaq intrusion spreads to listed companies

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  more than 2 years ago

SpzToid writes "Nasdaq's Directors Desk is a program sold to listed and private companies, whose board members use it to share documents and communicate with executives. Apparently Directors Desk was infected during a breach widely publicized earlier this year. It has now become known that hackers were able to access confidential documents and communications of the corporate directors and board members who received this infected application, said Tom Kellermann, chief technology officer with security technology firm AirPatrol Corp. It is unclear how long the Directors Desk application was infected before the exchange identified the breach, according to Kellermann and another source."
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China has relented on Search Censorship now?

SpzToid SpzToid writes  |  more than 4 years ago

SpzToid (869795) writes "The Christian Science Monitor is reporting success, when searching for the (sic) "...'Tiananmen Square massacre' was typed in, deliberately choosing the more controversial phrase instead of 'Tiananmen Square incident.'.
Maybe this is an 'accident'?"

Link to Original Source

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