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Would You Rent Out Your Unused Drive Space?

Sqr(twg) Re:Nope (331 comments)

I wouldn't call it "covered". What is says is: "If randomly distributed, the probability of the same redundant piece being hosted on the same controlled node is statistically quite small." It does not attempt to quantify what "quite small" means. So I'll try to do that.

Assume that you have a million blocks stored in the network. Each block is stored as three identical copies. Then assume that 1 % of the storage network is taken down at the same time. The probability that all copies of an individual block got lost is one in a million. However, the probability that at least one out of your one million blocks was lost is approximately 1-1/e or 63 %. So in this scenario, you are more likely than not to have lost data.

about three weeks ago
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Hackers Steal $5M In Bitcoin During Bitstamp Exchange Attack

Sqr(twg) Re:Were they hacked? (114 comments)

The bitcoin transaction chain is public, so in theory it is possible to track stolen bitcoins. People could arbitrarily decide not to accept bitcoin from tainted sources (or not to accept bitcoin at all) and that would make life much harder for thieves and extortionists. However, the accepted practice is that all bitcoins are equal. There is no governing authority that has the power to declare that certain transactions are "tainted".

If a mechanism for declaring bitcoin "tainted" would be introduced today, it would not only affect the original thieves, but also a large number of innocent extortionists and drug dealers who just happened to run their bitcoin through the same "tumbler" as the thieves. The whole system would collapse. So it's not going to happen.

about three weeks ago
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Bots Scanning GitHub To Steal Amazon EC2 Keys

Sqr(twg) Re:I guess i am old (119 comments)

Yep. Not checking your own spelling while attacking someones grammar on slashdot is stupid.

Dyslexia, on the other hand, does not appear to be correlated to intelligence.
 

about a month ago
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New Proposed Path for Manned Trips to Mars: Let Mars' Gravity Capture Spacecraft

Sqr(twg) Re:Wrong optimization (105 comments)

It is basically impossible to make a return trip to Mars because of the fuel requirements, which is why there has not been any manned missions, and will likely not be any in the near future. It takes a lot of fuel to deliver a very small amount of fuel to Mars. There'd have to be a long series of fuel delivery flights before a manned mission. For those, fuel efficiency is of course priority one.

about a month ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

Sqr(twg) Re:Really? .. it comes with the job (772 comments)

Another problem is that the interrogation techniques were not originally designed to get information. They were originally developed to get captured soldiers to admit to false confessions.

As was the case here. The the Bush/Cheney administration knew that they wouldn't get any useful intelligence from torture, but they wanted "evidence" pointing towards Saddam, so that they could start another war.

about 1 month ago
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Unity 8 Will Bring 'Pure' Linux Experience To Mobile Devices

Sqr(twg) Re:Mint Debian (125 comments)

I use Mint on my desktop, but write "Ubuntu" when I search on google. I think a lot of people do this.

You get more/better hits when you search for "Ubuntu" and the proposed solution will work on Mint 99.9 % of the time.

about 1 month ago
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US Treasury Dept: Banks Should Block Tor Nodes

Sqr(twg) Re:Not a strong chain if the IP is the strongest l (84 comments)

It's not meant to be the strongest link in the chain. Just a link in the chain. If, every time someone connects in a suspicious way, you call their cell-phone to verify, or ask for an extra one-time password, or at the very least send them an email, then you can detect/prevent a lot of fraud. (This applies not only to Tor, but to any type of "unusual" connection, for example connecting from Russia five minutes after using a credit card in the U.S.)

about 2 months ago
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Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

Sqr(twg) Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

Rsync will happily detect and copy changes without propagating whole files, yes. But only on network transfers, and it requires reading the entire file on both ends. When backing up to a local (removable) hard drive, which is what we are discussing here, it is usually faster to copy the file once than to checksum it twice, so that is what rsync does by default.

I have compared the tools, and I do know what they do. I found a hundredfold improvement in the time to backup a set of virtual machines on a linux server after switching from rsync to ZFS.

about 2 months ago
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Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

Sqr(twg) Re:Tape Culture Fallacy (284 comments)

If the file server uses a file system with checksums, and those checksums are also backed up, then it's a simple matter of reading through the tape and verifying the checksums. You don't need to compare to the original files.

(The probability of a corrupted backup server accidentally creating a correct checksum can be made arbitrarily small. Usually it's something like 2^-256.)

about 2 months ago
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Is LTO Tape On Its Way Out?

Sqr(twg) Re:Shyeah, right. (284 comments)

You might want to look at using ZFS instead of rsync. I switched a while back, and it was definitely worth the initial effort of changing the file system on the server.

With rsync you can get inconsistencies because not all files are backed up at the same instant. ZFS snapshots get around this.

If you modify a large file (say a 100 GB virtual machine), rsync will re-backup the entire file. ZFS will keep track of the part that changed and only copy that.

Also if a file on one of your multiple backups is subtly corrupt, you might not notice. Or even if you do compare the copies, you might not know which one is correct. With ZFS, the entire file system is checksummed and a raid or mirror can heal itself.

about 2 months ago
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I'm most interested in robots that will...

Sqr(twg) Re:Drive me around = I can get drunk (307 comments)

If you don't live in NYC or near another major metro/subway position, and you're too fucking stupid to call a cab instead of driving home drunk, then drinking becomes very dangerous.

FTFY.

about 2 months ago
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What Happens When Nobody Proofreads an Academic Paper

Sqr(twg) Re:MS Office Incompatibility (170 comments)

In that case I'm sure you're doing something like this:

\newif\ifdraft
\drafttrue % or \draftfalse

\ifdraft
(should we cite the fine Gabor paper here?)
\fi

about 3 months ago
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What Happens When Nobody Proofreads an Academic Paper

Sqr(twg) Re:MS Office Incompatibility (170 comments)

The paper in question was most likely not written in LaTeX, or they would have put a percent sign in front of the comment when they first put it in.

about 3 months ago
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There's No Such Thing As a General-Purpose Processor

Sqr(twg) Re:Saturday is Semantics Day (181 comments)

After all each time you add a different type of specialty processor into an environment, you introduce another codebase for the application, another toolchain to learn and another set of communication / OS support issues.

That will be an issue only for the OS and library developers. To the applications developer there will be no noticeable difference. It is already the case that you need to use specialized libraries to get maximum performance on common types of tasks.

For example, if you want to use an FFT on a modern "general purpose" processor, you will get much better performance using a standard library function than you would if you wrote your own. There are so may issues with memory access patterns, core and cache utilization, etc. that you will never have time to figure out if you just want to use the FFT (rather than do research on the algorithm itself.)

If a future CPU gets a built in FFT, then the standard library will be updated, and your application will just run faster. No modification necessary.

about 3 months ago
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Ferguson No-Fly Zone Revealed As Anti-Media Tactic

Sqr(twg) Re:Legal requirements (265 comments)

Keeping the press away is a matter of National Security. That's how it is in every police state.

about 3 months ago
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OneDrive Delivers Unlimited Cloud Storage To Office 365 Subscribers

Sqr(twg) Re:Who cares (145 comments)

I used to hang out in a swedish photography/videography forum. Bandwidth is cheap in Sweden, so a lot of these guys were on 100+ Mbit connections and liked to keep a backup in the cloud. Whenever a new "unlimited" storage service came around they'd hop on and upload tens of terabytes of photos/videos. (None of wich could be de-duplicated, since it was all original work.)

Inevitably, the storage service would update its TOS within a year, or go bankrupt.

about 3 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Do I Make a High-Spec PC Waterproof?

Sqr(twg) Re:Water cooled! (202 comments)

This is currently modded "funny", but is actually a very good solution to the problem. With water-cooling, all electrical components, except the radiator fan, can be in an air-tight enclosure. Then get an IP rated fan, or a larger, fanless radiator.

about 3 months ago
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Michigan Latest State To Ban Direct Tesla Sales

Sqr(twg) Re:Great Job (256 comments)

On the contrary: This is the ultimate free market. Even the politicians are for sale. All Tesla motors need to do is raise some money, buy half the legislature, and ban the sale of non-electric cars. A kickstarter campaign would probably do it.

about 3 months ago

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