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Comments

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Apple's "Warrant Canary" Has Died

St.Creed Re:There is no "almost impossible" (229 comments)

It would flip a coin...

Maybe it should just ask the cat.

You could, but there's an even chance it's dead :)

2 days ago
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Farmers Carry Multidrug-Resistant Staph For Weeks Into Local Communities

St.Creed Re:Natural immunity (122 comments)

Just this week I read an article describing a study that had the following results: of the mice that were given antibiotics that killed the clostridium bacterium, 99% developed an allergy to nuts.

This year there's a rash (:P) of articles showing that the immune system and gut bacteria are much more interconnected than previously thought.

3 days ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

St.Creed Re:they will defeat themselves (950 comments)

You may have Godwined the conversation but it's probably justified. Except it's not nazis, but more likely fascists (though the distinction is probably pretty moot if you live there, but I doubt we're going to see industrial death camps (you need math and chemistry for that)).

Why fascists? Because their social composition is made up from the same type of loser. The people joining ISIS are not, in the main, very successful with their lives. Petty criminals, dropouts, etcetera. And ISIS gives them the chance to become part of something larger, where they can say "Fuck you, I may not be good at math - but you know? We'll just BAN math!".

They can rape and loot and mutilate as much as they want, without sanction. They don't have to listen to all those people who have more power because they are whiter, or smarter, or richer, or all of them combined - they can just grab a gun and feel power in their hand. It's the old attraction of the small worm aspiring to be a big dragon.

3 days ago
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ISIS Bans Math and Social Studies For Children

St.Creed Re:they will defeat themselves (950 comments)

Wombs don't produce unthinking slaves. They can create a large amount of children that will turn into discontent youth later on, but if ISIS wants to hold power somewhere, that doesn't work so well for them - it only helps them when it's in someone else's territory where the discontented youth will see them as the solution, not as the problem. The Arab spring is all well and good when you're profiting from it, but not when it happens to yourself.

3 days ago
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UK's National Health Service Moves To NoSQL Running On an Open-Source Stack

St.Creed Re:How quickly will they run back to Oracle? (198 comments)

Congratulations!

Judging from the comments below, your troll has been wildly successful :)

about two weeks ago
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UK's National Health Service Moves To NoSQL Running On an Open-Source Stack

St.Creed Re:Complex? (198 comments)

Hmm.. I think you just coined a new word.

"Oponion: an opinion so irritating it brings tears to your eyes." :)

(the WTF-observations seem valid btw, but I couldn't resist adding to the Devil's Dictionary :))

about two weeks ago
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Apple Denies Systems Breach In Photo Leak

St.Creed Re:In combination with an accurate summary ... (311 comments)

Not "your password" but "any password".

Using the correct answer to a security question, you can reset the password for the backup. After that, you can download it and then apply the password you just entered. So the security is as strong as the weakest link, in this case still most likely the security questions.

about three weeks ago
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Apple Denies Systems Breach In Photo Leak

St.Creed Re:At the risk of blaming the victim... (311 comments)

f you don't want people to see pictures of you naked, don't take the pictures.

Yes, it's probably too much to ask for some security on your private files, nowadays. Options like "only sync photo's with permission" or "Do not sync" folders are way to complex to implement. So let's put the burden of dealing with failing technology on the consumer. After all, that worked really well for car vendors, right?

I foresee the day when Apple et al are going to pay HUGE settlements in class action suits if they keep up this rather cavalier attitude towards security.

about three weeks ago
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Apple Denies Systems Breach In Photo Leak

St.Creed Re:Seemed pretty obvious this was the case (311 comments)

In keeping with the theme of todays Q&A: Security questions are for people who don't use password managers. People who use password managers don't need them and can thus put random crap in them.

about three weeks ago
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News Aggregator Fark Adds Misogyny Ban

St.Creed Re:Sigh (748 comments)

"Tolerate my intolerance" is a failed argument when it comes to civil rights.

What about ignore my hypocrisy when I am lecturing you on tolerance?

That one still works.

about three weeks ago
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NATO Set To Ratify Joint Defense For Cyberattacks

St.Creed Re:false flag (34 comments)

There will not be teeth to this. There are no teeth to any NATO measures.

The summary could just as easily read:

At the upcoming NATO meeting, according to the NY Times, the 28 member states are expected to talk about some shit that no one will do anything about. Not for the first time, they will pass a meaningless resolution without teeth that no one will pay attention to.

And just like with other attacks, they'll just... log them.

about three weeks ago
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Princeton Nuclear Fusion Reactor Will Run Again

St.Creed Re: Spherical Torus (147 comments)

The first airplane only flew 120 feet.

... and sixty years later we were walking on the moon. Sixty years after the first fusion reactor, where are we?

Back home?

about a month ago
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13-Year-Old Finds Fungus Deadly To AIDS Patients Growing On Trees

St.Creed Re: Blame Africa (134 comments)

I am an African American (not by choice)

Really? Not by choice? Weird. Where I live, we all get to choose our skincolor right up to our birthdate. After that it's set in stone, though. But thanks for clearing that up for me. Otherwise I'd have thought you'd volunteered or something.

Oh, and by the way? Get help. You obviously cought Trollitis from a tree that snuggled up close.

about a month ago
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For Microsoft, $93B Abroad Means Avoiding $30B Tax Hit

St.Creed Re:tax by transaction (316 comments)

Okay. Well, actually I applaud that. The tax on groceries hits the people with the lowest wages the hardest (relatively), reducing their intake of vegetables even more. Locally, I think the VAT is reduced to one third of the standard percentage for essentials like food.

about a month ago
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It's Dumb To Tell Kids They're Smart

St.Creed Re:They always told me I was so smart... (243 comments)

I've never seen people fired because they are smart - they are often hired because they are smart, but they are often passed over for promotion too....

Being smart isn't the only reason for promotion. For instance, 10 years ago I was not promoted to a senior position where I worked at the time, and I was pretty upset about it. I mean, I was competing with former kindergarten teachers, in an IT position. Should have licked them without even trying, right?

Wrong. The next step up required all sorts of "soft" people skills that I only graduately received by training and experience. Looking back, my boss was right at the time from his POV. So while smart people get passed over for promotions all the time, it's usually because their intelligence has specialized in just one direction, where the next level up requires more diverse skills. I know several senior scientists that I'd never promote to head of anything. But they're extremely smart. However, they need "handlers" and those are the people that get promoted to a position of more authority.

In some companies this source of friction is reduced by giving people a technical promotion track - with the pay, but without the authority and need to manage other people. I think that would help a lot.

about a month ago
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For Microsoft, $93B Abroad Means Avoiding $30B Tax Hit

St.Creed Re:tax by transaction (316 comments)

What, no Value Added Tax?

about a month ago
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It's Dumb To Tell Kids They're Smart

St.Creed Re:They always told me I was so smart... (243 comments)

People who perceive you are smarter (whether you are, or not) will often treat you as a threat.

Unless you make sure *they* reach their goals and know that they did it because you helped them - unobtrusively, not rubbing their nose in it, coaching them as much as you can. As a freelancer/contractor (thus: non-threatening) this has helped me get a lot of repeat business because the clients *like* me. Even up to the CxO level. It's also a matter of knowing your weaknesses: I'm not going to encroach on any CxO area because that's not where my ambition lies.

I did see one very smart guy getting the boot from my own boss. He knew he was smart (and he was), but he was also a really annoying asshole who always tried to let other folks do all the work - and my boss knew. He went over the line one time too many and got fired. Now, he wasn't a threat, but he would be exactly the type to whine about how "dumb people fire smart people", instead of taking a good hard look at his own behaviour.

In my experience I've never seen people getting fired because they were smart. They've always been fired because they were trying to be a bit too clever for their own good and played fast and loose with the rules ("I don't need to test this change before it enters production - I *know* it's good!" - in a regulated environment) and with their colleagues and boss. And sometimes because they thought they were smart, but the rest of the world just disagreed.

about a month ago
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Researchers Hack Gmail With 92 Percent Success Rate

St.Creed Re:Putting it in practice = Difficult (87 comments)

In The Netherlands most banks that use SMS do this. It's not hard to implement when your IT is already reasonably capable.

about a month ago
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Why the Universe Didn't Become a Black Hole

St.Creed Re:Big Bang is RELIGION (109 comments)

Either we accept the "hand of god" in tuning the universe so precisely, or (far stupider IMO), we believe some silly anthropomorphic principle, or we simply accept that the physics is incomplete.

While I agree the last explanation is probably the most likely one (a dampening effect that occurs at a certain point could be a plausible explanation), don't discount nr. 2: we just don't know (and we cannot know) how many universes are generated at any given point in time. Perhaps quantum fluctuations generate 1 billion "universe seeds" per cubic centimeter at any given second, and since they are random, most don't lead to another universe. Some do, and the ones that are "exactly right" give rise to universes like ours. Should we ever find a way to measure these things (not in the next decades, I think), we might find that option 2 is actually the real one. But I agree that option 3 is the most likely one.

about a month ago
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Why the Universe Didn't Become a Black Hole

St.Creed Re:Big Bang is RELIGION (109 comments)

I think we can use the English equivalent: Cat-holic :)

about a month ago

Submissions

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Is our universe a quantum cellular automaton?

St.Creed St.Creed writes  |  about a month ago

St.Creed (853824) writes "Noble-prize winner Gerard van 't Hooft is best known for the work that enabled physicists to predict the mass of the top quark, w-boson and z-boson. But he has long been known for his rather "idiosyncratic" ideas on the nature of the universe as well. His theory on the holographic universe is by now fairly well known. However, he has taken it a step further in a 202-page article (or book) on Arxiv.org, where he claims that there may well be a system with classical properties underlying quantum mechanics.

Our models suggest that Einstein may still have been right, when he objected against the conclusions drawn by Bohr and Heisenberg. It may well be that, at its most basic level, there is no randomness in nature, no fundamentally statistical aspect to the laws of [quantum] evolution.

The ideas presented in the introduction are quite interesting to read even for non-physicists."
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