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Comments

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Princeton Nuclear Fusion Reactor Will Run Again

St.Creed Re: Spherical Torus (147 comments)

The first airplane only flew 120 feet.

... and sixty years later we were walking on the moon. Sixty years after the first fusion reactor, where are we?

Back home?

2 days ago
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13-Year-Old Finds Fungus Deadly To AIDS Patients Growing On Trees

St.Creed Re: Blame Africa (134 comments)

I am an African American (not by choice)

Really? Not by choice? Weird. Where I live, we all get to choose our skincolor right up to our birthdate. After that it's set in stone, though. But thanks for clearing that up for me. Otherwise I'd have thought you'd volunteered or something.

Oh, and by the way? Get help. You obviously cought Trollitis from a tree that snuggled up close.

2 days ago
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For Microsoft, $93B Abroad Means Avoiding $30B Tax Hit

St.Creed Re:tax by transaction (316 comments)

Okay. Well, actually I applaud that. The tax on groceries hits the people with the lowest wages the hardest (relatively), reducing their intake of vegetables even more. Locally, I think the VAT is reduced to one third of the standard percentage for essentials like food.

3 days ago
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It's Dumb To Tell Kids They're Smart

St.Creed Re:They always told me I was so smart... (243 comments)

I've never seen people fired because they are smart - they are often hired because they are smart, but they are often passed over for promotion too....

Being smart isn't the only reason for promotion. For instance, 10 years ago I was not promoted to a senior position where I worked at the time, and I was pretty upset about it. I mean, I was competing with former kindergarten teachers, in an IT position. Should have licked them without even trying, right?

Wrong. The next step up required all sorts of "soft" people skills that I only graduately received by training and experience. Looking back, my boss was right at the time from his POV. So while smart people get passed over for promotions all the time, it's usually because their intelligence has specialized in just one direction, where the next level up requires more diverse skills. I know several senior scientists that I'd never promote to head of anything. But they're extremely smart. However, they need "handlers" and those are the people that get promoted to a position of more authority.

In some companies this source of friction is reduced by giving people a technical promotion track - with the pay, but without the authority and need to manage other people. I think that would help a lot.

3 days ago
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For Microsoft, $93B Abroad Means Avoiding $30B Tax Hit

St.Creed Re:tax by transaction (316 comments)

What, no Value Added Tax?

3 days ago
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It's Dumb To Tell Kids They're Smart

St.Creed Re:They always told me I was so smart... (243 comments)

People who perceive you are smarter (whether you are, or not) will often treat you as a threat.

Unless you make sure *they* reach their goals and know that they did it because you helped them - unobtrusively, not rubbing their nose in it, coaching them as much as you can. As a freelancer/contractor (thus: non-threatening) this has helped me get a lot of repeat business because the clients *like* me. Even up to the CxO level. It's also a matter of knowing your weaknesses: I'm not going to encroach on any CxO area because that's not where my ambition lies.

I did see one very smart guy getting the boot from my own boss. He knew he was smart (and he was), but he was also a really annoying asshole who always tried to let other folks do all the work - and my boss knew. He went over the line one time too many and got fired. Now, he wasn't a threat, but he would be exactly the type to whine about how "dumb people fire smart people", instead of taking a good hard look at his own behaviour.

In my experience I've never seen people getting fired because they were smart. They've always been fired because they were trying to be a bit too clever for their own good and played fast and loose with the rules ("I don't need to test this change before it enters production - I *know* it's good!" - in a regulated environment) and with their colleagues and boss. And sometimes because they thought they were smart, but the rest of the world just disagreed.

3 days ago
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Researchers Hack Gmail With 92 Percent Success Rate

St.Creed Re:Putting it in practice = Difficult (87 comments)

In The Netherlands most banks that use SMS do this. It's not hard to implement when your IT is already reasonably capable.

4 days ago
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Why the Universe Didn't Become a Black Hole

St.Creed Re:Big Bang is RELIGION (109 comments)

Either we accept the "hand of god" in tuning the universe so precisely, or (far stupider IMO), we believe some silly anthropomorphic principle, or we simply accept that the physics is incomplete.

While I agree the last explanation is probably the most likely one (a dampening effect that occurs at a certain point could be a plausible explanation), don't discount nr. 2: we just don't know (and we cannot know) how many universes are generated at any given point in time. Perhaps quantum fluctuations generate 1 billion "universe seeds" per cubic centimeter at any given second, and since they are random, most don't lead to another universe. Some do, and the ones that are "exactly right" give rise to universes like ours. Should we ever find a way to measure these things (not in the next decades, I think), we might find that option 2 is actually the real one. But I agree that option 3 is the most likely one.

about two weeks ago
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Why the Universe Didn't Become a Black Hole

St.Creed Re:Big Bang is RELIGION (109 comments)

I think we can use the English equivalent: Cat-holic :)

about two weeks ago
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Why the Universe Didn't Become a Black Hole

St.Creed Re:Because of the expansion (109 comments)

As far as I understood the physics, it was because "space" doesn't have a set of well-defined borders with customs etc. but is a curved area, where the curve is defined by the energy available inside the universe (energy == mass). Once the whole thing collapses it should curve the area much steeper, "contracting" the universe.

But I may be totally off base here, I'm not a physicist.

about two weeks ago
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Posting Soccer Goals On Vine Is Illegal, Say England's Premier League

St.Creed Re: Pinch of salt needed (226 comments)

Expectation of privacy deals with portrayal of humans, but I'm not sure that's the issue here (no football player in a stadium has any expectation of privacy to begin with, I think we can all agree on that). I think "public vs. private space" is going to be the main focus of any lawsuit, because it's about the right of the drone operator to enter private grounds to begin with. Or private airspace - and that's an even bigger can of worms due to the laws about where private and public airspaces start. I know that a lot of countries have different laws on that one.

Let's just say the only ones getting rich from the first few drone video's of football games would be the lawyers.

about two weeks ago
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Web Trolls Winning As Incivility Increases

St.Creed Re:Not Government (457 comments)

Have you read the comments on CNN about Syria and Iraq? It's hardcore nazi's vs. Greater Israel fascists vs. The Zionist Conspiracy Is Killing Us All vs. ISIS sympathizers who think beheading children is actually quite defensible since they were evil to begin with. If they aren't the worst, I shudder to think what could be worse.

about two weeks ago
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Posting Soccer Goals On Vine Is Illegal, Say England's Premier League

St.Creed Re: Pinch of salt needed (226 comments)

Jumping over a fence, using whatever equipment you want (drones or whatever), doesn't suddenly turn an enclosed, walled off and guarded space into a public space. So I wouldn't use that argument.

But if you were to overlook the field from an appartment or highrise in the area, well, that would be fair game I suppose.

about two weeks ago
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Slashdot Asks: Should Schooling Be Year-Round?

St.Creed Re:No, school should not be year-round. (421 comments)

21 days off per FTE is the legal minimum in The Netherlands. Once worktime reduction (*) is factored in, it's usually more like 21 days + 12 = 33 days off. That's without the public holidays, we're talking flexible days here.

And we're not at the top position for days off. As far as I know, German workers have more days off each year.

(*) a lot of collective bargaining agreements have clauses where most people work 2 hours less each week in order to create more jobs in that sector.

about two weeks ago
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Slashdot Asks: Should Schooling Be Year-Round?

St.Creed Re:No, school should not be year-round. (421 comments)

Drone 31751, please report to re-education camp five for "schooling". You seem to have misaligned your memories after reading those historical novels once again. As you are well aware of, everyone volunteers to work at least two workperiods from age 4 upwards. Do not spread anti-computer propaganda.

Thank you for your cooperation.

The Computer.

about two weeks ago
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Slashdot Asks: Should Schooling Be Year-Round?

St.Creed Re:scooing? (421 comments)

"back"?

about two weeks ago
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Unesco Probing Star Wars Filming In Ireland

St.Creed Re:Who owns the island? (181 comments)

Aw come on.... they were having *such* a good time until you showed up injecting "facts" into the debate!

about three weeks ago
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Unesco Probing Star Wars Filming In Ireland

St.Creed Re: Today I Learnt that... (181 comments)

It's still bad PR, and that can be used by political opponents if handled right. Which means that any politician currently in power will rather not have such letters in their inbox. Before you know it the opposition will be holding a press conference, saying things like: "As we all know, the current government can't be considered green, despite their name. Why, the UNESCO even had to send a letter about this priceless part of our environment because they were damaging it! What hypocrites! You better vote for us. Because we care..."

Not just that, but when negotiating over returning cultural heritage items, a government that this happened to would find itself in an unpleasant position: "oh, we can't give you back your {priceless statues/Elgin marbles/fossilized remains} because as you have just shown, you can't be trusted with UNESCO heritage sites. Have a nice day!".

So, not entirely toothless unless you don't give a fuck about world opinion or negotiations anyway.

about three weeks ago
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Why the "NASA Tested Space Drive" Is Bad Science

St.Creed Re:Chill (315 comments)

The placebo effect is well documented and scientifically valid. The name it goes by is only relevant due to the way it enforces said effect. And saying placebo effects are useless is silly: it's much better to have someone cured from a placebo than from chemicals (or hormones), especially when dealing with children where the final effects of hormones and chemicals are not all that well understood.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Is our universe a quantum cellular automaton?

St.Creed St.Creed writes  |  3 days ago

St.Creed (853824) writes "Noble-prize winner Gerard van 't Hooft is best known for the work that enabled physicists to predict the mass of the top quark, w-boson and z-boson. But he has long been known for his rather "idiosyncratic" ideas on the nature of the universe as well. His theory on the holographic universe is by now fairly well known. However, he has taken it a step further in a 202-page article (or book) on Arxiv.org, where he claims that there may well be a system with classical properties underlying quantum mechanics.

Our models suggest that Einstein may still have been right, when he objected against the conclusions drawn by Bohr and Heisenberg. It may well be that, at its most basic level, there is no randomness in nature, no fundamentally statistical aspect to the laws of [quantum] evolution.

The ideas presented in the introduction are quite interesting to read even for non-physicists."
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