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Once Vehicles Are Connected To the Internet of Things, Who Guards Your Privacy?

StayFrosty Re:The good news is (125 comments)

The T-Bird's ignition is timed a solid-state electronic ignition control module that reads the timing from a sensor and grounds the coil causing the high-voltage burst of electricity that fires the spark plug. The role of the distributor is to select which spark plug should spark. Prior to the invention of electronic ignition, gasoline engines used a set of mechanical points that rode on a cam lobe under the distributor. When it came time to fire a spark plug, the points would come in to contact with each other and cause the coil to ground. This is the system used by the '68 Plymouth.

All fuel injectors for gasoline-powered road cars (mechanical injectors were used in racing for a while and were used for many years in diesel engines) are controlled by an ECU. Early Bosch fuel injection units used in 1960s VWs used an ECU the size of a small suitcase. When EFI became more mainstream in the mid '80s the ECU was significantly smaller. They weren't nearly as complicated as modern ECUs--they just ran a loop reading a few sensors and adjusting fuel injector speed and duration.

Starting the engine has been pretty much the same since electric start came out in the early 1920s if not earlier. A big relay (or in really old stuff a big switch) sends lots of amps to a powerful electric motor that turns the engine over. Even if the motor did get fried by an EMP, the '68 plymouth likely has a manual transmission and could be roll started.

For the record, your '84 T-Bird was a piece of shit. So was my '84 Mercury Cougar :-)

yesterday
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Once Vehicles Are Connected To the Internet of Things, Who Guards Your Privacy?

StayFrosty Re:The good news is (125 comments)

Your '84 T-bird was fuel-injected and had electronic ignition. It was in no way EMP-proof.

yesterday
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Senator Dianne Feinstein: NSA Metadata Program Here To Stay

StayFrosty Re:solution? (510 comments)

Here's a solution I figure just about every "privacy troll" can probably agree with:

The NSA needs to stop collecting data on US citizens. If a US citizen needs to be investigated, it's the FBI's job to do that investigation.
If the FBI wants to collect data on a US citizen, they should get a warrant the normal way. None of this secret court nonsense.

about 8 months ago
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Windows 9 Already? Apparently, Yes.

StayFrosty Re:9.1 (1009 comments)

1) Remove keyboard/mouse
2) slide monitor down, almost facing up (as you currently do with your smartphone.

3. Enjoy a sore neck from looking down, slow input, and fingerprints all over your screen.

FTFY

about 8 months ago
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GNU Hands Out Trisquel At a Microsoft Store

StayFrosty Re:Ignoring the problem. (274 comments)

Sure you could cobble together a bit of this and a bit of that that sort does something similar, but it takes 10x as much effort, only has 1/2 as many features, and is a nightmare to support or troubleshoot when it breaks (or a new guy comes onboard and has to figure out your homebrew mess you created.

It's not cobbling stuff together, it's a different thought process for tackling a problem. Rather than having one big mess provided by Microsoft, you have lots of individual parts that do one thing well and are configured to work together--see the LAMP stack for an excellent example.

A new employee doesn't have to figure out the "homebrew" mess, they just have to know how to manage the application(s) they are responsible for--A skill that is vastly lacking with most Windows Server admins I have met--no, rebooting a server does not "fix" the fact that every 5 days the server is at 5% load with 95% memory utilization.

Most of Microsoft's problems in the server space is that the products ship with 10x more "features" enabled than are actually needed. This makes for loads of time disabling things or having vulnerable servers. A properly managed unix-based solution usually has 100% of the needed requirement--no more, no less. This limits exposure to security issues and limits the effects of bugs or bad code on the overall health of the system.

about a year and a half ago
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FBI Dad's Misadventures With Spyware Exposed School Principal's Child Porn

StayFrosty Re:I'm still trying to wrap my brain around... (346 comments)

[quote]dd if=/dev/random of=/dev/sda[/quote]

I would suggest using /dev/urandom as the random number generator used by /dev/random will likely run out of entropy long before the first pass completes.

about 2 years ago
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NPD Group Analysts Say Windows 8 Sales Sluggish

StayFrosty Re:Yes (269 comments)

Windows 8 is a lot better at loading the proper drivers out of the box (didn't have to download a thing on the two systems I've done clean installs on),

I hear this after every windows release and it's completely false. Naturally, Windows 8 includes drivers for more hardware that any other release. It includes drivers for hardware made between the release of Windows 7 and now plus what was in Windows 7. It's no better at finding drivers, it just includes drivers that were not included with Windows 7 or Vista or XP or whatever because the hardware was made after the release of the OS. In 3 years, Windows 8 will be in the same state as Windows 7 is now... go out to the vendor's website, find the hardware, download the driver, click next a bunch of times, and reboot.

Other OS's bundle most drivers with the kernel and provide regular updates through the regular channels for both bundled and third-party drivers. This way you don't have to screw around with the vendor's website trying to remember if your motherboard is a DK-790FX-MR2 or a DK-790FX-MR2SW 2 years after you bought it.

Better multi-monitor support

I'll have to disagree here too. I tried the consumer preview with 3 monitors and... well... I can't say I was impressed. The regular desktop was just like Windows 7 (fine) but Metro didn't seem to know what to do.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: High-Tech Ways To Manage a Home Library?

StayFrosty Re:Kodak moment (230 comments)

woosh

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: IT Contractors, How's Your Health Insurance?

StayFrosty Re:The only choice is to vote DEM / obama (468 comments)

Indeed I do. Nowhere in the constitution is the federal government given the power to mandate or provide health care. That falls in to the jurisdiction of the state according to the Constitution, making the healthcare debate in this Presidential election cycle legally moot. Of course, regardless of what the constitution said, the Supreme court ruled Obamacare is legal so all bets are off...

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: IT Contractors, How's Your Health Insurance?

StayFrosty Re:The only choice is to vote DEM / obama (468 comments)

You do realize that Obamacare was modeled on Romneycare, right?

What politicians say they will do and what they do are completely different things.

Vote 3rd party. Maybe there will be a choice that people are actually happy with next time (or maybe 2 elections from now.)

about 2 years ago
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KDE Announces 4.9 Beta1 and Testing Initiative

StayFrosty Re:how much longer... (134 comments)

NO damage was done to the Linux desktop. Both camps have different ideas on how things should be done. Both camps tailor their project to a specific set of users. One combined project would likely alienate even more users since neither camp would be happy with the end result.

Competition is also helpful for spurring innovation. Without competition, stagnation occurs because there is nothing driving progress forward. Look at how long IE6 stuck around until Firefox provided enough market pressure to force Microsoft to innovate again. Other OS's would provide some competition but from the looks of Metro I'm not entirely sure that will be the case.

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Holding ISPs Accountable For Contracted DSL Bandwidth

StayFrosty Re:Call the ISP (345 comments)

There are lots of free and open source monitoring tools that can help determine if something is out of alignment. SmokePing would probably be incredibly helpful you your situation. Nagios is another popular monitoring tool. Netdisco could help with inventory and topology mapping. It's worth spending a little time getting a good monitoring solution set up so you can be fixing the problem before the phone starts ringing.

more than 2 years ago
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I prefer my input devices to be as _______ as possible.

StayFrosty Comfort first (279 comments)

Comfortable first and foremost. The three peripherals I use the most are my keyboard, mouse and monitor. If they are not comfortable to use, the entire machine is uncomfortable to use.

I use mechanically switched keyboards. Cherry Blue at home, Cherry Brown at work (I don't want my co-workers testing the multi-functional aspect of the keyboard by subjecting my skull to violent impacts.) and an IBM model M on the KVM for my servers. They not only are the most comfortable keyboards to use but they can also withstand violent impacts while being much more precise than spongy membrane keyboards. My keyboard at home also has programmable macro keys so it falls in to the customizable category as well.

I tend to use comfortable, wireless laser mice because they don't drift because of tension on the cord and they can be moved anywhere on my desk easily. Both my work and home desktops have internal li-on batteries with a battery meter that gives plenty of warning when they need to be charged. I have had one of the mice since ~2004 and the battery still lasts about a month using it 40 hours a week. I am constantly using the extra forward/back buttons on the side of the mice and feel kind of lost without them. At $75 when new, I consider the first one I bought a good investment since it has served me for 8 years without any issues.

more than 2 years ago
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Exploits Emerge For Linux Privilege Escalation Flaw

StayFrosty Re:Broken on Android too (176 comments)

You are almost right. Sadly, some of us need flash and java to do our jobs. F*** You Cisco!

more than 2 years ago
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Exploits Emerge For Linux Privilege Escalation Flaw

StayFrosty Re:Broken on Android too (176 comments)

If your browser/flash player/some other legit app has a zero day that allows the execution or arbitrary code you are just as screwed as if you install a malicious app.

more than 2 years ago
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Exploits Emerge For Linux Privilege Escalation Flaw

StayFrosty Broken on Android too (176 comments)

Awesome that this will lead to easier root access on Android devices.
On the flip side I'm sure Android vendors won't get around to patching this for a while and our devices will be vulnerable.

Now, off to patch my Linux boxen.

more than 2 years ago
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What Happens To Your Files When a Cloud Service Shuts Down?

StayFrosty Dropbox as an example? (592 comments)

What happens if a similar service, like Dropbox, gets shut down?

One of the reasons I prefer Dropbox for storing my non-essential files to some of the other cloud file storage services is the syncing feature. I keep the files on my local drive (all of my computers local drives, actually.) If Dropbox were to go down for any reason, I a copy of that file on every machine.

more than 2 years ago
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How Publishers Are Cutting Their Own Throats With eBook DRM

StayFrosty Re:I hate DRM. (355 comments)

We are moving down that road with movies. Instead of paying $20 for a DVD you can now watch 100 movies on Netflix all month long for $8. This means the cost (or value) of the movie isn't really much more than $0.08 instead of $20. Between Netflix and piracy, all we are waiting for is the last bit to go away and we will see movies have $0 value.

You are confusing the concept of owning and renting. When you watch a movie on Netflix, you don't get to keep it. Before netflix, movie rentals were a couple bucks tops, so the difference isn't nearly what you are making it out to be.
 
With Movie tickets right around $12 before popcorn or soda, I'd say the worth of watching a movie 1 time is still $12. I doubt the major movie studios would be pulling in record profits if a movie had a $0 value.
 

Ebooks are going to be going that way soon as well. You can now find poor copies of newly released books downloadable within days. Better quality content is coming, just as it did with music and movies. The revenue from ebooks will be destroyed just as certainly as it was for other digital items.

Do you know what pirates did before the invention of ebooks? They went to their local library, checked out the book they wanted to read, walked outside, and shouted "ARRRR!"
 
Using your logic, the value of a book is zero because anyone with a library card can check them out for free.

more than 2 years ago
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AMD Confirms Commitment To x86

StayFrosty Re:One thing AMD has over Intel (163 comments)

No, it hasn't. Intel heatsinks are attached by plastic clips that go through holes in the motherboard. AMD heat sinks are clipped to a bracket that is bolted through the motherboard to a backing plate behind the CPU socket. They use a cam-style locking mechanism to provide tension and keep the heatsink tight while eliminating the prying that was needed on socket 370 and socket A heatsinks.

more than 2 years ago
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AMD Confirms Commitment To x86

StayFrosty Re:Radeon may save them... (163 comments)

The AMD buyout of ATI happened in 2006. Your 5850 was made by AMD.

more than 2 years ago

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