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Corning Reveals Gorilla Glass 4, Promises No More Broken IPhones

SternisheFan Re:people drop their phones :( (160 comments)

Every time I've seen someone with broken screen, it was an iPhone. It's about time Apple did this, but then they do profit by making phones that need repairs/ replacing.

12 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: What's the Most Hackable Car?

SternisheFan Re:I just want to... (186 comments)

Why not just have a decent aftermarket radio installed and be done with all those problems?

2 days ago
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Philae's Batteries Have Drained; Comet Lander Sleeps

SternisheFan LA Time article (337 comments)

From http://www.latimes.com/science...

Fifty-six hours after landing on the surface of a comet, Philae sent one more round of data about its new home across 310 million miles of space. Then, its power went out.

"@Rosetta, I'm feeling a bit tired, did you get all my data? I might take a nap..." read a message on the @philae2014 Twitter feed.

The Rosetta mission's twitter response: "You've done a great job Philae, something no spacecraft has ever done before."

All the experiments on board the lander had a chance to run and return information back to Earth. Philae's instruments scooped up material from the comet's surface, took its temperature, sent radio waves through its nucleus, and went hunting for hints of organic material. Cameras took the first panoramic images from the surface of a comet.

It has been a whirlwind ride for the lander, which was dropped onto the surface of the mountain-sized comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday morning. Two harpoons that were designed to tether it to the surface failed to fire, and scientists say the lander made two bounces before becoming stable. The first bounce caused the lander to go one-third of a mile into the air.

Friday morning, ESA officials expressed concern that the lander would not have enough battery power left to send back any more data from experiments it was conducting on its new, icy home.

When Philae landed on the comet on Wednesday, it had enough battery power for about 60 hours of work. Scientists initially hoped that it would continue to operate on solar power, but the lander seemed to have settled in a hole on the comet, where it was surrounded by rock-like structures that block the sun.

Stefan Ulamec, the lander manager from DLR, said the that one of the solar panels on the lander was getting about an hour and 20 minutes of sunlight a day. Two other panels got just 20 to 30 minutes a day, he said.

At a news conference Friday morning before the last signal was received, Ulamec said it was possible that scientists would not hear from the lander again.

"We are hoping to get contact again this evening, but it is not secured," he said. "Maybe the battery will be empty before it talks to us."

Happily, that turned out not to be the case. On Friday evening, ESA reported that all the science experiments had been deployed, and that the lander had been rotated 35 degrees in an attempt to get more sun on one of its larger solar panels.

There is a chance that as the comet flies closer to the sun, the increase in solar energy will allow ESA to communicate with Philae once again.

ESA officials say the odds of that happening are small, but with Philae, the little lander that could, anything is possible.

about a week ago
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Comet Probe Philae To Deploy Drill As Battery Life Wanes

SternisheFan And..., battery's out of juice (223 comments)

From www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-philae-lander-data-20141114-htmlstory.html

Fifty-six hours after landing on the surface of a comet, Philae sent one more round of data about its new home across 310 million miles of space. Then, its power went out.

"@Rosetta, I'm feeling a bit tired, did you get all my data? I might take a nap..." read a message on the @philae2014 Twitter feed.

The Rosetta mission's twitter response: "You've done a great job Philae, something no spacecraft has ever done before."

All the experiments on board the lander had a chance to run and return information back to Earth. Philae's instruments scooped up material from the comet's surface, took its temperature, sent radio waves through its nucleus, and went hunting for hints of organic material. Cameras took the first panoramic images from the surface of a comet.

It has been a whirlwind ride for the lander, which was dropped onto the surface of the mountain-sized comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday morning. Two harpoons that were designed to tether it to the surface failed to fire, and scientists say the lander made two bounces before becoming stable. The first bounce caused the lander to go one-third of a mile into the air.

Friday morning, ESA officials expressed concern that the lander would not have enough battery power left to send back any more data from experiments it was conducting on its new, icy home.

When Philae landed on the comet on Wednesday, it had enough battery power for about 60 hours of work. Scientists initially hoped that it would continue to operate on solar power, but the lander seemed to have settled in a hole on the comet, where it was surrounded by rock-like structures that block the sun.

Stefan Ulamec, the lander manager from DLR, said the that one of the solar panels on the lander was getting about an hour and 20 minutes of sunlight a day. Two other panels got just 20 to 30 minutes a day, he said.

At a news conference Friday morning before the last signal was received, Ulamec said it was possible that scientists would not hear from the lander again.

"We are hoping to get contact again this evening, but it is not secured," he said. "Maybe the battery will be empty before it talks to us."

Happily, that turned out not to be the case. On Friday evening, ESA reported that all the science experiments had been deployed, and that the lander had been rotated 35 degrees in an attempt to get more sun on one of its larger solar panels.

There is a chance that as the comet flies closer to the sun, the increase in solar energy will allow ESA to communicate with Philae once again.

ESA officials say the odds of that happening are small, but with Philae, the little lander that could, anything is possible.

about two weeks ago
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Assassin's Creed: Unity Launch Debacle Pulls Spotlight Onto Game Review Embargos

SternisheFan Re:Bug (473 comments)

The llink changed, pic in this ArsTechnica article.... http://arstechnica.com/gaming/...

about two weeks ago
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Comet Probe Philae Unanchored But Stable — And Sending Back Images

SternisheFan paste from Reddit... (132 comments)

Got fresh news from the team, they are broadcasting live right now on french TV ! Philae landed, and bounced slowly for 2 hours, and travelled 1km away the targeted site. Yes 1000m. It's now stopped slanted, some cams are shooting the sky, other the ground, and other nearby rocks, as seen on the first photo. It's inside some kind of hole, not much sun for the solar panels. EDIT1: It landed on the core of the comet, it sees the light from the sun for about 1 to 2 hours per day. In the next days/week the angle of the comet will change relative to the sun, and it very likely the solar panel will get more sunlight so more power for the probe. EDIT2 : Many labs are performing right now and performed the whole night. For now they put the drilling on hold since they don't know if it's tied to the ground or not. Drilling op is also power hungry so it's kinda a good thing it's on hold since there's not much sun available for the panels. Battery life been re-estimated to 50-55hours due to the lack of sunlight. This includes the 7 hours of descent.They are constantly adjusting missions goals, depending on conditions, power available, etc, EDIT3 : The probe has been working to gather scientifict data the whole time, including during the bounces. There's already a large amount of data available, whatever happens next.

EDIT4 : It's resting on "hard" ground, with a layer of dust about 30cm, and that's good news because it allows measurements to proceed as planned. As in, it's not burried into soft soil.

EDIT5 : Solar panels are deployed, radio link is up and running, but the fact the probe is slanted/in a hole/random ground limits the time it can communicate with the orbiter, altho that's not jeopardizing the mission. There's already a lot of things transmitted successfully to the orbiter. Contact between the orbiter and the probe can be done twice per day. EDIT6 : The first place it touched the comet was exaclty where it was planned, flat and cosy, too bad it didn't harpoon there. EDIT7 : Next contact will be near 19:30GMT, until 23:45GMT approx. This night they made contact with the probe (from the orbiter) at about 4:00GMT, and at 5:30GMT they had safely recovered all the data from the first batch of tests. From the ESA blog :

The team are ensuring that Rosetta maintains an orbit that is optimised for lander communication support; they are planning a manoeuvre (thruster burn) today to be conducted on Friday that will help keep Rosetta where it should be. Rosetta already conducted a burn last night as part of this effort.

Rosetta is presently sending signals to the ground stations at about 28 Kbps; Ignacio says that the spacecraft's own telemetry downlink uses about 1 or 2 Kbps of this, so the rest is being used to download science data from Rosetta and lander science and telemetry from the surface.

Important press conference from ESA at 13:00GMT. Over now. http://rosetta.esa.int/ EDIT8 : So there was more photos, and details. Important bit, they're planning on righting the lander, studying the best way to do it. First rebound was about 1000m long, 0.38m/s up, lasted 2 hours. 2nd rebound was 0.03m/s, 7 minutes long. Then it stuck itself in the side of the crater at the 3rd impact.

EDIT9 : Harpoons received the signal to fire, but didn't activate. There's no indication of damage on solar panels. The lander can hibernate and may likely still work several monthes from now, even if under limited power. They confirmed the orbiter will make adjustement tomorrow morning (friday) to optimize communication time with the lander. Operations are prioritized, from the less risky to the most.

permalink

about two weeks ago
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Comet Probe Philae Unanchored But Stable — And Sending Back Images

SternisheFan Re:Big deal... (132 comments)

If the History Channel has taught me anything in the past couple of years, whatever the puzzle is, it was Aliens.

about two weeks ago
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Manslaughter Conviction Overturned For Scientists Who Didn't Predict Earthquake

SternisheFan Re:They can be tried again, I think? (139 comments)

Those seismologists have left Italy for good. They pulled out, took their equipment and won't be sharing their data with the Italian scientists. I don't blame them.

about two weeks ago
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The Students Who Feel They Have the Right To Cheat

SternisheFan Re:If everyone in government and industry cheats.. (438 comments)

I just went to GoogleNews and searched "school cheating"... Atlanta school officials speaking how there are all different levels of cheating, NY students paying up to $3,200 to a guy to take their tests, a girl suing over an F she was given after crib notes were found... So, certainly not just Indian students...

about two weeks ago
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Landfill Copies of Atari's 'E.T.' End Up On eBay

SternisheFan Re:$50+, really? Can I get $50 for my copy? (107 comments)

Strangely, there are lots of those now bidding in the $200+ range. I was going to post that there is no way they would ever get their excavation costs back but I might be wrong. What are people buying these for? I also have a large box of working atari games. You can buy large lots on ebay or at garage sales for next to nothing. Why the premium? Is it just because of the history?

“Look at this. It’s worthless — ten dollars from a vendor in the street. But I take it, I bury it in the sand for a thousand years, it becomes priceless. Like the Ark.”

about two weeks ago
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Internet Archive Launches Arcade of Classic Games In the Browser

SternisheFan Re: How long will it last... (94 comments)

Archive.org prides itself on preserving media that falls under the public domain, but none of the listed games are in the public domain. There's not even any ambiguity about it.

It's possible that the people in charge of this service assume that the project fulfils some fair use criteria for being about historical preservation, but I doubt any judge would agree with them. It's also possible that the site owners know that they don't have the rights to host these games, and are hoping to slip under the publishers' radars. Either way, they can probably expect a few cease and desist letters in the near future, so enjoy the service while you can.

about three weeks ago
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Birds Found Using Human Musical Scales For the First Time

SternisheFan Re:I'm sure I heard (80 comments)

That is disturbing. Reminded me of the old "Faces of Death" videotape when the South African tourists eating the brains of freshly slaughtered monkey at a local restaurant.

about three weeks ago
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Birds Found Using Human Musical Scales For the First Time

SternisheFan Re:I'm sure I heard (80 comments)

Your observation of bird decline in Europe is confirmed...

A study found that about 90 percent of a decline occurred in the most common bird species, including grey partridges, skylarks, sparrows and starlings

Europe has an estimated 421 million fewer birds than three decades ago, and current treatment of the environment is unsustainable for many common species, a study released on Monday said. The population crash is related to modern farming methods and the loss and damage of habitats, according to the study published in science journal Ecology Letters. "This is a warning from birds throughout Europe. It is clear that the way we are managing the environment is unsustainable for many of our most familiar species," said Richard Gregory of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, which co-led the study.

www.france24.com/en/20141103-europe-has-421-million-fewer-birds-30-years-ago/

On topic, since songbirds have always been around us humans, it occurs to me perhaps we learned scales and melody from our prehistoric avian friends?

about three weeks ago
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SpaceShipTwo Pilot Named; Branson Vows To 'Move Forward Together'

SternisheFan Re:ground based pics of ss2 breakup (112 comments)

I've pasted an excerpt of ArsTechnica's reader comments below, hope it provides clarification on the subject of VG's engine choices. (IANARocketScientist):

......windnwar wrote: show nested quotes http://www.parabolicarc.com/ Go there, they have been following the issues for a couple years now. The original engine was only stable doing a massive injection of helium, more so then could be done in flight, so they switched to a plastic grain and they have been pushing the test schedule to meet deadlines rather than meet the results they needed. The engine was under powered for the weight and they had to change the altitude they were going to be flying too. This modified engine was supposed to end up in the second version of spaceship two due to the modifications that would be needed, instead it ended up in the first one as they didn't have time. The program is appears to be a mess, and they don't appear to be following a safe testing schedule. Even in the press conference today they were asked had this engine flown and he answered yes, though it had not, the engine had to be reconfigured for the different fuel grain, so it has not flown. Its not just a simple swap of the grain. Given the description of multiple people that witnessed the flight, it suffered a hard start that destroyed the motor and led to the loss of the craft and one of the pilots lives.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Android "Not Compatible" Malware "maturing"

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  3 days ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Mobile malware reaches new heights

By Cory Bennett — 11/20/14 04:58 PM EST
Cyber criminals are reaching a level of sophistication when targeting smartphones previously only seen in desktop computer attacks.

Mobile security research firm Lookout revealed findings on Thursday showing hackers can now effectively turn Android phones into so-called botnets, a compromised device that can be used to communicate with other infected devices for nefarious purposes.

The company estimates between 4 million and 4.5 million phones in the U.S. have been turned into botnets this year as a result.
For years, cybersecurity experts knew malware targeting smartphones was a growing threat as the Internet-connected devices became more ubiquitous.

Lookout thinks this malware shows the threat has finally taken a dangerous jump.

The malware has been getting onto smartphones by first infecting a legitimate website. When users visit that website from their phone, they unwittingly download the malicious code.

This particular strategy is “one of the first times hacked websites were used at a large scale to specifically target and infect mobile devices,” said Tim Strazzere, Lookout’s lead research and response engineer, in a blog post.

The malware behind it, dubbed NotCompatible, was initially “compelling threat” when the company started tracking it two years ago, Strazzere explained. But NotCompatible has evolved.

The newest iteration “set a new bar for mobile malware sophistication and operational complexity,” Strazzere said. “This malware is a prime example of how mobile malware complexity is advancing and is borrowing technical tactics already seen in PC malware.”

National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers sees mobile hacking as a Top 3 concern in 2015.

“The greatest growth these days” in cyberattacks “is not in the corporate fixed, large-network structures,” he testified before the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday.

“We are all turning to mobile digital devices as vehicles to enhance our productivity,” Rogers added.

That makes those devices a desirable target for hackers.

Lookout said the hackers behind the malware are renting out the infected devices to criminals who then conduct large-scale scams — from buying up tickets in bulk to sending out more spam.

“We expect more of this type of sophistication in mobile malware,” Strazzere said. “Mobile malware maturity is here.”"

Link to Original Source
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US Justice Department Used Fake Cell Towers In Planes To Track Criminals

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "US Justice Department Used Fake Cell Towers In Planes To Track Criminals
By Tyler Lee on 11/13/2014

There is a lot of concern regarding privacy at the moment, especially in the wake of the Snowden reports which revealed that for the past few years, the government has been spying on its citizens. A recent study also revealed that a vast majority of adults feel like they have no control over their personal information anymore.
Well if all of that bothers you, then this might bother you even more. According to a report from The Wall Street Journal (via MacRumors), it has been revealed that the United States Justice Department has been using fake cell towers installed in airplanes to acquire cellphone data that is used to track criminals. Apparently this is a program that has been in place since 2007 and uses Cessna airplanes (not the commercial plans, thankfully) to operate out of at least five metropolitan area airports.
These planes have been outfitted with a “dirtbox” that is meant to replicate cellular towers, thus tricking cellphones into reporting information to them, which in turn is used to help track individuals who are under investigation. Given that non-criminals’ data can be captured in the process as well, there are some who are questioning the legality of the practice as well as raising concerns about the safeguarding of the information that they have captured in the process."

Link to Original Source
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Why Scientists Think Completely Unclassifiable and Undiscovered Life Forms Exist

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Discovering a new type of bacteria or virus or, hell, even a mammal at this point isn't exactly news. It happens all the time, and there are tens of millions of species out there that aren't described. Scientists can at least place newly discovered life into specific categories, but that's because they've been using the same methods of finding it for decades.

New microbes are often discovered by doing what's known as environmental sampling, in which all the DNA and RNA from, say, a soil sample or an ocean sample is amplified and replicated so that it can be sequenced, and then researchers try to separate it out into species as best as they can.

http://motherboard.vice.com/en..."

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Long-term study finds zero link between violence in video games and real life

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "The first long-term study has been completed on the link between the consumption of violent media and real-life violent acts, and has found... there is none. In fact, the only possible trend that cropped up over the last century was that an increased consumption of violent video games correlated to a decrease in youth violence.

The results have been published in the Journal of Communication. onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcom.12129/full"

Link to Original Source
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The Internet Archive launches its arcade: Classic games in a browser

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about three weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Today, The Internet Archive launched The Internet Arcade, a free, emulated, browser-compatible collection comprising arcade games from the 1970s to the 1990s.

Of course, while some games in the archive have been effectively abandoned and even forgotten, others are still popular and actively exploited by their creators, such as games in the Pac-Man franchise. Games from well-known companies such as Capcom, Konami, Namco, Taito, and Sega appear in the list, among many others — around 900, in total.

Archivist Jason Scott writes about the process of getting the Arcade up and running on his personal blog. He explains its purpose like this: "... my hope is that a handful, a probably tiny percentage [of players], will begin plotting out ways to use this stuff in research, in writing, and remixing these old games into understanding their contexts.""

Link to Original Source
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Fossil fuels should be 'phased out by 2100' says IPCC

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about three weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "The IPCC says fossil fuels — without carbon capture — should be "phased out" by 2100
Continue reading the main story
Related Stories

Europe 'will fail to protect climate'
Climate impacts 'overwhelming' — UN
UN '95% sure' humans cause warming
The unrestricted use of fossil fuels must end soon if the world is to avoid dangerous climate change.

That's one of the key messages in a new report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The IPCC outlines an approach that could see most of the world's electricity produced from low carbon sources by 2050.

Fossil fuels, without carbon capture and storage (CCS), would be phased out "almost entirely" by 2100.

The short Synthesis Report was published on Sunday in Copenhagen, after a week of intense debate between scientists and government officials.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

If we can't develop carbon capture we will have to stop using fossil fuels if we want to stop dangerous climate change”

Prof Myles Allen
IPCC
The report says the world faces "severe, pervasive and irreversible" impacts without effective action on carbon.

"It's very clear from the report that fossil fuels have had their day," said Prof Arthur Petersen from UCL and a member of the Dutch government's team in Copenhagen.

"Of course it is up to politicians to decide which risks they want to take with climate change, so it is not policy prescriptive in saying that these reductions should take place, but it is absolutely clear that the reductions should take place if you want to limit (temperature increases) to 2C."

Rapid phase out
For electricity production, this would mean a rapid move away from coal and into renewables and other low carbon forms, including nuclear.

The report suggests renewables will have to grow from their current 30% share to 80% of the power sector by 2050.

In the longer term the report states "fossil fuel power generation without CCS is phased out almost entirely by 2100".

Three previous reports from the IPCC, issued over the past 13 months, have outlined the causes, the impacts and the potential solutions to climate change.

The Synthesis boils these three into one, with the intention of informing politicians engaged in attempts to deliver a new global treaty on climate by the end of 2015.

It re-states many familiar positions:

Warming is "unequivocal" and the human influence on climate is clear
Since the 1950s the observed changes are unprecedented over decades to millennia
The period from 1983 to 2012, it says, was likely the warmest 30 year period of the last 1,400 years
Warming impacts are already being seen around the globe, in the acidification of the oceans, the melting of arctic ice and poorer crop yields in many parts
Without concerted action on carbon, temperatures will increase over the coming decades and could be almost 5C above pre-industrial levels by the end of this century
Politicians have agreed that a rise of 2C is the threshold of danger. In this report the IPCC authors outline a number of routes to keep to that level by the end of the century.

Countries will need to adapt rapidly, but almost all scenarios see near zero emissions by 2100.

"We can't afford to burn all the fossil fuels we have without dealing with the waste product which is CO2 and without dumping it in the atmosphere," said Prof Myles Allen from Oxford University, and a member of the IPCC core writing team.

"If we can't develop carbon capture we will have to stop using fossil fuels if we want to stop dangerous climate change, that is a very clear message that comes out of the IPCC reports."

The clarity of the language over the future of coal, oil, and gas was welcomed by campaigners.

"What they have said is that we must get to zero emissions, and that's new," said Samantha Smith from WWF.

"The second thing is they said that it is affordable, it is not going to cripple economies."

Saudi concerns
In their discussions on fossil fuels, there was a fierce battle over a chart that showed how much the electricity sector needed to curb its carbon.

According to one observer, "the Saudis went ballistic" over its inclusion.

Another significant fight was over the inclusion of text about Article 2 of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

It quickly became a standoff between those who want the focus to be on cutting emissions against those who think the right to develop economies must come first.

An unlikely alliance between Bolivia and Saudi Arabia ultimately saw the section dropped entirely from the underlying report.

"There was a box in the draft, and in the end that box wasn't included in the underlying report," said Prof Petersen.

"History will tell us whether it was wise or not, there are lessons to be learned here."

Some of those attending said they believed that that tackling climate change and sustainable development went hand in hand.

"Different countries come to different perspectives" said Prof Jim Skea from Imperial College and a review editor of the report.

"But from the science perspective, we need them both. We need to walk and chew gum at the same time."

Follow Matt on Twitter @mattmcgrathbbc."

Link to Original Source
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Pope says evolution doesn't mean there's no God

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "In an address to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, the Pope explains that God is not some sort of wizard.

by Chris Matyszczyk CNET @ChrisMatyszczyk October 27, 2014 10:56 AM PDT

The pope says evolution is valid, as long as God is the beginning.

Arguments around creation and evolution sometimes seem too similar to "Which came first? The chicken or the egg?"

Science and religion get placed on either side of a spectrum, with a section in the middle for those who'd like to hedge their bets.

On Monday, the pope outlined his belief with respect to God and evolution. Speaking to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Pope Francis insisted that there was no reason to believe that God and evolution were somehow incompatible.

It's just, he suggested, that God came first.

He said, according to Breitbart's translation: "Evolution requires the creation of beings that evolve." Though God is, he said, no wizard, he's still at the heart of all things, because he's the creator of all things.

The pope explained that God "created beings and let them develop in accordance with the internal laws that He has given to each one, so that they could arrive at their fulfillment," according to the translation.

The pope's views differ radically from those of some eminent scientists, such as Stephen Hawking. Hawking recently made it clear that he dismisses the idea of God. He said: "Before we understand science, it is natural to believe that God created the universe. But now science offers a more convincing explanation.""

Link to Original Source
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UK Gun Owners Now Subject To Surprise Warrantless Firearm Storage Inspections

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "A new firearm policy from the United Kingdom Home Office, put in force on October 15, has accelerated the once-proud nation’s devolution into a police state. The Home Office’s October 2014 “Guide on Firearms Licensing Law” adds a new rule allowing for police to conduct warrantless surprise inspections of a gun owner’s firearm storage practices. As bad as that is, what’s far worse is that the President of the United States cites England’s gun control policies as a model for America to follow."
Link to Original Source
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Cancer-killing stem cells engineered in lab

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Scientists from Harvard Medical School have discovered a way of turning stem cells into killing machines to fight brain cancer.

In experiments on mice, the stem cells were genetically engineered to produce and secrete toxins which kill brain tumours, without killing normal cells or themselves.

Researchers said the next stage was to test the procedure in humans.

A stem cell expert said this was "the future" of cancer treatment.Dr Khalid Shah, lead author and director of the molecular neurotherapy and imaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, said the results were very positive.

"After doing all of the molecular analysis and imaging to track the inhibition of protein synthesis within brain tumours, we do see the toxins kill the cancer cells."

He added: "Cancer-killing toxins have been used with great success in a variety of blood cancers, but they don't work as well in solid tumours because the cancers aren't as accessible and the toxins have a short half-life."

But genetically engineering stem cells has changed all that, he said.

"Now, we have toxin-resistant stem cells that can make and release cancer-killing drugs."

This study shows you can attack solid tumours by putting mini pharmacies inside the patient...”

Prof Chris Mason
University College London
Chris Mason, professor of regenerative medicine at University College London, said: "This is a clever study, which signals the beginning of the next wave of therapies."

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World's First Airborne Wind Turbine to Bring Renewable Energy and WiFi to Alaska

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Wind turbines have become airborne! An enormous helium-filled wind turbine will soon float over the city of Fairbanks, Alaska to produce enough electricity for more than a dozen families living off the grid. Designed and built by MIT startup Altaeros Energies, the turbine known as BAT-Buoyant Airborne Turbine will hover at an altitude of 1,000 feet for 18 months, catching air currents that are five to eight times more powerful than winds on the ground."
Link to Original Source
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Cops Need a Warrant to Grab Your Cell Tower Data, Florida Court Rules

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "BY KIM ZETTER 10.17.14 | 3:31 PM |

Americans may have a Florida drug dealer to thank for expanding our right to privacy.

Police departments around the country have been collecting phone metadata from telecoms and using a sophisticated spy tool to track people through their mobile phones—often without obtaining a warrant. But a new ruling out of Florida has curbed the activity in that state, on constitutional grounds. It raises hope among civil liberties advocates that other jurisdictions around the country may follow suit.

The Florida Supreme Court ruled Thursday that obtaining cell phone location data to track a person’s location or movement in real time constitutes a Fourth Amendment search and therefore requires a court-ordered warrant.

The case specifically involves cell tower data for a convicted drug dealer that police obtained from a telecom without a warrant. But the way the ruling is written (.pdf), it would also cover the use of so-called “stingrays”—sophisticated technology law enforcement agencies use to locate and track people in the field without assistance from telecoms. Agencies around the country, including in Florida, have been using the technology to track suspects—sometimes without obtaining a court order, other times deliberately deceiving judges and defendants about their use of the devices to track suspects, telling judges the information came from “confidential” sources rather than disclose their use of stingrays. The new ruling would require them to obtain a warrant or stop using the devices.

The American Civil Liberties Union calls the Florida ruling “a resounding defense” of the public’s right to privacy."

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Germ-zapping robot could support war against Ebola (w/ Video)

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "...Xenex is a company that produces a germ-zapping robot that could be a beneficial support in fighting potential risks of contamination in hospital settings and address sterilizing spaces contaminated by Ebola. A video from the company explains what the machine does in general: the Xenex technology utilized is all about ultraviolet light, produced by the sun in three types, UV-A, -B and -C. The A and B types cause suntans and burns, but C is filtered by the ozone layer around the earth. As it does not occur in nature, bacteria and viruses have no defense against it. When germs are exposed to UV-C, the light kills the germs. The Xenex machine, once producing this light in a hospital room, can in five minutes drastically reduce germs in the room. The user stays outside the room; with prolonged exposure, UV-C could damage the eyes; the robot must always be run in an empty room. For additional safety, an orange cone stays outside of the room, as well as caution signs for the door. Inside the room, there is a gray cone that watches out for motion. Should motion be detected, the gray cone will turn the device off. The device is run when the room is empty after the patient is discharged and terminal cleaned. The xenon bulb —the Xenex robot utilizes pulsed xenon to create UVC light—will pulse for five minutes, disinfecting the area around the device. UV-C light cannot go through glass, walls or windows."
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Robot Arm Will Install New Earth-Facing Cameras On The Space Station

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 2 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Canada’s robotic Canadarm2 will install the next two Urthecast cameras on the International Space Station, removing the need for astronauts to go outside to do the work themselves, the company announced today (Sept. 30).

Urthecast plans to place two Earth-facing cameras on the United States side of the station (on Node 3) to add to the two they already have on the Russian Zvezda module. Technical problems with the cameras forced the Russians to do an extra spacewalk to complete the work earlier this year."

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iOS 8.0.1 update disabling cellular and TouchID

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Update: Some users are reporting that the update is disabling cell service and TouchID buttons on some phones. I can confirm that this happened on my AT&T iPhone 6, though a Verizon iPhone 5 still seems to be getting service just fine. For now we recommend holding off—do not download and install this update yet.

Update 2: Apple has pulled the 8.0.1 update. Affected iPhone 6 users are allegedly being told by Apple support to try restoring their phones with iTunes.

Update 3: On our iPhone 6, restoring through iTunes has re-installed iOS 8.0 and it appears to be working normally. This process erases your data from the phone, but it appears to be the best way to get back up and running as of this writing."

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Pot black market still thrives after Colorado legalization

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 2 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Although recreational use of marijuana has been legal in the state of Colorado for nine months, some people are still choosing to buy it on the black market. Critics say legalization has created two systems: a legal market for those who can afford it and an underground market for people who can't. PBS NewsHour Special Correspondent Rick Karr reports from Denver.

(excerpted transcript from video below)

RICK KARR: One of the benefits attached to legalization was that it would eliminate the black market. But that market is still thriving, according to a 39 year old marijuana grower who asked us to call him John Doe and to conceal his identity because he sells on the underground market.

The illegal trade is doing especially well in black and Latino communities, and he says it works the same way it did when pot was illegal.

JOHN DOE: You have that one guy, that guy that shines, that’s the Robin Hood of the neighborhood. This man supplies a little ghetto area. Simple as that. Breaks his own pound into little ounces and helps everybody in his community. So they can afford it with him. That’s how it’s happened.

RICK KARR: Yeah. And that’s how it happened before, too.

JOHN DOE: Yeah. Yeah. Nothing’s changed.

RICK KARR: John Doe says low-income buyers turn to the black market because prices are higher at legal retail stores. There’s conflicting information, but an ounce of pot on the black market can cost as little as 180 dollars. At the store Andy Williams owns, you have to pay around 240 dollars for an ounce.

That’s partly because the price includes a 15 percent excise tax, a 10 percent marijuana tax, the state sales tax, and Denver’s marijuana sales tax.

LARISA BOLIVAR: The taxes are an overreach and excessive. And it’s a regressive tax and it impacts the poor most."

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Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 2 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "By Craig Timberg September 17 at 9:51 PM
Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user data.

The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal dilemma: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked its latest encryption in a way that makes it almost impossible for the company – or anyone else but the device’s owner – to gain access to the vast troves of user data typically stored on smartphones or tablet computers.

The key is the encryption that Apple mobile devices automatically put in place when a user selects a passcode, making it difficult for anyone who lacks that passcode to access the information within, including photos, e-mails, recordings or other documents. Apple once kept possession of encryption keys that unlocked devices for legally binding police requests, but will no longer do so for iOS8, it said in a new guide for law enforcement.

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” Apple said on its Web site. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”"

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What Is the Universe? Real Physics Has Some Mind-Bending Answers

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 2 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Thhe questions are as big as the universe and (almost) as old as time: Where did I come from, and why am I here? That may sound like a query for a philosopher, but if you crave a more scientific response, try asking a cosmologist.

This branch of physics is hard at work trying to decode the nature of reality by matching mathematical theories with a bevy of evidence. Today most cosmologists think that the universe was created during the big bang about 13.8 billion years ago, and it is expanding at an ever-increasing rate. The cosmos is woven into a fabric we call space-time, which is embroidered with a cosmic web of brilliant galaxies and invisible dark matter.

It sounds a little strange, but piles of pictures, experimental data and models compiled over decades can back up this description. And as new information gets added to the picture, cosmologists are considering even wilder ways to describe the universe—including some outlandish proposals that are nevertheless rooted in solid science:"

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Leaked video shows Windows 9 Start menu in action

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 2 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "A leaked video shows the Windows 9 Start menu in interactive glory. If it's for real, this Start menu beats out all other previous versions, as you can see in the video I've embedded. I'd like to get my hands on it right now.

The German site WinFuture has the two-minute video, which focuses primarily on the Windows Start menu in action. I've embedded it below, so there's no need for me to give you a second-by-second narration. But there are a few important features in it that do a great job of helping turn Windows 9 into more of a unified operating system than is the kludge that is Windows 8."

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3D-Printed Car takes it's first test drive

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 2 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "When it comes to 3D printing, new breakthroughs and new achievements are being realized almost on a daily basis. From 3D printable human tissue, to a 3D printed life-size castle, and now a 3D printed automobile, the technology never seizes to amaze.

This week, at the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) in Chicago, Arizona-based automobile manufacturer Local Motors stole the show. Over the six day span of the IMTS, the company managed to 3D print, and assemble an entire automobile, called the ‘Strati’, live in front of spectators.

Although the Strati is not the first ever car to be 3D printed, the advancements made by Local Motor with help from Cincinnati Inc, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have produced a vehicle in days rather than months.

Last year, engineer Jim Kor designed the Urbee 2 3D printed car. The vehicle which weighed about half of what a typical automobile would weigh, was as strong as steel. What sets Local Motors’ ‘Strati’ 3D printed car apart from the likes of the Urbee 2, is the fact that they managed to print and construct the entire vehicle in just six days, whereas the Urbee 2 took 2500 print hours to complete.

This breakthrough was made possible by a machine produced by Cincinnati Inc., in cooperation with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) machine is capable of printing at speeds unheard of on traditional 3D printers. It is unbelievably able to lay down up to 40 pounds of carbon infused ABS plastic per hour, with precise accuracy. After an exciting six days of printing, in front of a live audience, the vehicle is finally complete. The only question that remained was, ‘Does it drive?”

As you can see by the Vine clips we have posted within this article, it most certainly does! The car, which features just 40 parts, drove out of McCormick Place in Chicago just moments ago. As to what Local Motors plans to do next with the Strati 3D printed car, now that the vehicle has been printed and drives like a charm, they will seek to launch production-level 3D printed vehicles for sale to the public in the coming months.

This is certainly a big step for all companies involved, as well as the 3D printing industry in general. Let us know your thoughts on this amazing accomplishment in the Local Motors 3D printed car forum thread on 3DPB.com."

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Steam-draining NASTY spreads via Twitch

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 2 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Beware geeks bearing gifts:
Eskimo infection will drop you right Inuit
By Iain Thomson, 12 Sep 2014
6

Infosec experts are warning of new malware spreading through game-streaming web hit Twitch: the software nasty subverts Steam accounts to drain player's wallets, and could take away all their precious weaponry.

The malware spreads by bombarding users of Twitch's chat feature with links to a raffle for special kit used in the popular first-person shooter Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Clicking on the proffered URL opens a Java application that claims to record the player's name and email address, and asks for permission to publish winner's name.

In fact it does none of this – and instead drops a Windows binary file onto the user's system to execute. Security biz F-Secure, which first noted the malware, has dubbed it Eskimo, and the rogue code searches for Steam accounts that may be present on the infected Windows system.

Eskimo allows its masters to buy items from the Steam account, sell the user's existing armory on the community market, accept new friends in the gaming market, and trade items between friends.

"All this is done from the victim's machine, since Steam has security checks in place for logging in or trading from a new machine," said F-Secure Labs in an advisory.

"It might be helpful for the users if Steam were to add another security check for those trading several items to a newly added friend and for selling items in the market with a low price based on a certain threshold. This will lessen the damages done by this kind of threat."

A spokesman for Amazon-owned Twitch told The Register that the firm has had one user contact them about the issue and it's not considered a widespread problem, although the company is taking steps to limit the spread of the malware.

"Security PSA: Do not click the 'csgoprize' link in chat. This is a phishing attempt to install malware and compromise your Steam account," said the firm's technical support team on Twitter.

"We will work to block that link, but be aware that variants could appear. In general, you should be wary of any links in chat." ®"

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