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Comments

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SteadyServ Helps Keep the Draft Beer Flowing (Video)

SternisheFan Re:Disable Advertising (48 comments)

Right?! Can we have another category in the top left of the main page? You know,

--------

stories

submissions

popularstories

submissions

popular

blog

build NEW

ask slashdot

book reviews

games

idle

yro

slashvertisements

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So when I want to read a slashvertisement, I can go there?!!

yesterday
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Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police

SternisheFan Related CNET article (4 comments)

Just days after Apple CEO Tim Cook discussed the company's privacy record with Charlie Rose, Apple has published a new privacy policy that explains how it handles its users' personal information and government requests for that information.

In an open letter published Wednesday, Cook reiterated points he made during the interview with Rose, in which he said Apple takes "a very different view" of privacy than its Silicon Valley brethren, which often make a business out of collecting and leveraging customer information.

"We don't build a profile based on your email content or Web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don't 'monetize' the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don't read your email or your messages to get information to market to you," Cook wrote in the letter, which was published on Apple's privacy page.

On the heels of the release of several private, nude images of celebrities pilfered from Apple iCloud accounts, the new privacy section includes guidelines from protecting online accounts. After an Apple investigation determined that the image release was the result of a targeted attack on individual accounts and not poor security on its part, Cook said the company would bolster its security alert system on the online storage service.

In addition to reactivating iCloud's two-factor identity verification system earlier this week, Apple urged customers to use of strong passwords and said iCloud data is encrypted while in transit, and in most cases, during storage.

Cook's letter also sought to reassure Apple's customers that their data was safe from the prying eyes of government surveillance agencies, which have reportedly procured information on electronic communications from Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo, among others.

"I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services," Cook said. "We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will."

The same policy now applies to users' personal portable devices, Cook wrote. He noted that data on devices running iOS 8, the new mobile operating system Apple released Wednesday, are protected by users' personal passcodes that Apple can't bypass.

"So it's not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8," Cook wrote.

http://www.cnet.com/news/tim-c...

2 days ago
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Is the Tesla Model 3 Actually Going To Cost $50,000?

SternisheFan Re:More importantly (388 comments)

More importantly, the fact that the majority of the value in the car is in a perishable resource. That battery will NOT last forever, and when it needs a new one you'd be better off scrapping the entire car and buying a new one. How good is that for the environment?

Even if the battery is easily swapped out?

3 days ago
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Funding Tech For Government, Instead of Tech For Industry

SternisheFan Re:Edit needed (64 comments)

The 'one' is a superfluity that commonly occurs in speech, particularly in the US, but it is neither necessary nor even good style.

"Established" is being used as an adjective, and it demands a noun or pronoun!

Correct. An 'established' what? It needs to have a noun of some type appended. Lazy editing.

4 days ago
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Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

SternisheFan Re:We call this propaganda. (191 comments)

I'm not suggesting the Earth suddenly began to start changing 200 years ago, of course human industrialzation is the cause. Can you stop it? No, the best we can do is learn to 'retard' the process, and create solutions for the damage we have/are causing. That's going to come through tech and necessity. Necessity meaning we will run out of oil soon enough. When we do, will we have learned enough applicable knowledge to overcome our worldwide energy needs. But if we don't, oh well, reset needed. Nature will start over. The Earth will recover whatever puny changes humans cause, it's just equal to a major volcano blast that naturally occurs over its lifespan. Humans? Maybe not so much. Darwin award time for the human race, though some of us will survive (we're like roaches, we are everywhere on the planet). And life will adapt and go on.

The sci-fi question here is: Are we smart enough to survive ourselves?"

4 days ago
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Sci-Fi Authors and Scientists Predict an Optimistic Future

SternisheFan Re:We call this propaganda. (191 comments)

Yeah, the climate has changed, does that mean the future must be all 'doom and gloom'? No, it means more real estate will begin to open up, while others flood out, and the people will move to different areas. Change is necessary. The future is bright, despite the always on information we receive via the internet. Through the internet connected new world, it is now a time of great learning. The newer generations will take that ball and run with it, and life will continue to go on. Humans will just adapt to any climate change. Adapting is what we are best at.

4 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

SternisheFan Re:Level of Abstraction (132 comments)

Yeah, but you ''didn't do this''. Write back when you did more than type about a story on the internet that wasn't 'exact' as you felt it should have been. G'nite to you sir.

4 days ago
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Court: Car Dealers Can't Stop Tesla From Selling In Massachusetts

SternisheFan Re:hahaha (155 comments)

You 'aint kidding, brother. I worked for a car dealership years ago, the games being played on customers by the finance guy were outrageous. Taking money from the contract front end, the back end. I eventually got disgusted working there and quit. Not before I saw one wife trying to get to the finance guy on the showroom floor to strangle him after she called him on forging her signature to paperwork that added $2000 to the agreed upon price.

4 days ago
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Funding Tech For Government, Instead of Tech For Industry

SternisheFan Edit needed (64 comments)

"If you're a creative engineer looking to build a product, you're probably going to end up starting your own business or joining an established."

I assume the ''one'' got dropped. :^0

4 days ago
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Sapphire Glass Didn't Pass iPhone Drop Test According to Reports

SternisheFan Re:Non story (206 comments)

Yep, was doing some math in my head today, this go around of iPhones will net them more than the cost of the glass factory. Perhaps by the next iPhone/iPad they'll have figured out how to incorporate sapphire glass without the fracturing issue.

4 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

SternisheFan Re:it's means it is (132 comments)

Okay, get over it already. The ability to print out a chassis is exciting new tech that needs refinement, it may end up changing and shaping the future.

5 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

SternisheFan Re:Does it drive? (132 comments)

How long do you think this "car" will last?

Don't know the strength of having carbon strands added to the plastic, the chassis will need to be durability tested. Probably not long on NYC roads. It's a proof of concept car. Now, print it out with a material that's proven will last, you have the start of an easily mass producible vehicle at a substantially lower price.

5 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

SternisheFan Re:Level of Abstraction (132 comments)

Yeah, but if you had done it, you would have been proud.

5 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: What to do after digitizing VHS tapes?

SternisheFan Re:Upload to YouTube? (2 comments)

External hard drive, problem solved.

5 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

SternisheFan Re:it's means it is (132 comments)

I concede the 'sloppy' headline. Very cool tech, though.

5 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

SternisheFan Re:it's means it is (132 comments)

Then the writer of the story shouldn't have outright LIED when he/she said the entire car was 3D printed. I hate liars far more than nitpickers.

Fail. Nowhere does the author state the ''entire car'' was printed,

5 days ago
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3D-Printed Car Takes Its First Test Drive

SternisheFan Re:Level of Abstraction (132 comments)

So for you the engine is one part, and thus you are talking from the perspective of a relatively high abstraction level. Q.E.D.

(No engine, motor. One part.) 40 parts, 3D printed body=1part. includes seats, floor,framework, many separate car parts combined into one unit saves much assembly. It's a proof of concept car. Much refinement to progress further, therefore, somewhat 'abstract', sure. Done before? No. It's a game changer in 'car' tech. As they say,"Stay tuned for further developments...".

5 days ago

Submissions

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Pot black market still thrives after Colorado legalization

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  yesterday

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Although recreational use of marijuana has been legal in the state of Colorado for nine months, some people are still choosing to buy it on the black market. Critics say legalization has created two systems: a legal market for those who can afford it and an underground market for people who can't. PBS NewsHour Special Correspondent Rick Karr reports from Denver.

(excerpted transcript from video below)

RICK KARR: One of the benefits attached to legalization was that it would eliminate the black market. But that market is still thriving, according to a 39 year old marijuana grower who asked us to call him John Doe and to conceal his identity because he sells on the underground market.

The illegal trade is doing especially well in black and Latino communities, and he says it works the same way it did when pot was illegal.

JOHN DOE: You have that one guy, that guy that shines, that’s the Robin Hood of the neighborhood. This man supplies a little ghetto area. Simple as that. Breaks his own pound into little ounces and helps everybody in his community. So they can afford it with him. That’s how it’s happened.

RICK KARR: Yeah. And that’s how it happened before, too.

JOHN DOE: Yeah. Yeah. Nothing’s changed.

RICK KARR: John Doe says low-income buyers turn to the black market because prices are higher at legal retail stores. There’s conflicting information, but an ounce of pot on the black market can cost as little as 180 dollars. At the store Andy Williams owns, you have to pay around 240 dollars for an ounce.

That’s partly because the price includes a 15 percent excise tax, a 10 percent marijuana tax, the state sales tax, and Denver’s marijuana sales tax.

LARISA BOLIVAR: The taxes are an overreach and excessive. And it’s a regressive tax and it impacts the poor most."

Link to Original Source
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Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  2 days ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "By Craig Timberg September 17 at 9:51 PM
Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user data.

The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal dilemma: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked its latest encryption in a way that makes it almost impossible for the company – or anyone else but the device’s owner – to gain access to the vast troves of user data typically stored on smartphones or tablet computers.

The key is the encryption that Apple mobile devices automatically put in place when a user selects a passcode, making it difficult for anyone who lacks that passcode to access the information within, including photos, e-mails, recordings or other documents. Apple once kept possession of encryption keys that unlocked devices for legally binding police requests, but will no longer do so for iOS8, it said in a new guide for law enforcement.

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” Apple said on its Web site. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”"

Link to Original Source
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What Is the Universe? Real Physics Has Some Mind-Bending Answers

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  4 days ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Thhe questions are as big as the universe and (almost) as old as time: Where did I come from, and why am I here? That may sound like a query for a philosopher, but if you crave a more scientific response, try asking a cosmologist.

This branch of physics is hard at work trying to decode the nature of reality by matching mathematical theories with a bevy of evidence. Today most cosmologists think that the universe was created during the big bang about 13.8 billion years ago, and it is expanding at an ever-increasing rate. The cosmos is woven into a fabric we call space-time, which is embroidered with a cosmic web of brilliant galaxies and invisible dark matter.

It sounds a little strange, but piles of pictures, experimental data and models compiled over decades can back up this description. And as new information gets added to the picture, cosmologists are considering even wilder ways to describe the universe—including some outlandish proposals that are nevertheless rooted in solid science:"

Link to Original Source
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Leaked video shows Windows 9 Start menu in action

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  4 days ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "A leaked video shows the Windows 9 Start menu in interactive glory. If it's for real, this Start menu beats out all other previous versions, as you can see in the video I've embedded. I'd like to get my hands on it right now.

The German site WinFuture has the two-minute video, which focuses primarily on the Windows Start menu in action. I've embedded it below, so there's no need for me to give you a second-by-second narration. But there are a few important features in it that do a great job of helping turn Windows 9 into more of a unified operating system than is the kludge that is Windows 8."

Link to Original Source
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Sapphire Glass didn't pass drop test

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a week ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Sapphire screens were part of the iPhone 6 design until the glass repeatedly cracked during standard drop tests conducted by Apple suppliers. So Apple abandoned its sapphire plans before the iPhone 6 product launch September 9.

VentureBeat has learned that recent supplier channel checks by an IDC analyst yielded several reports of the sapphire failures and Apple’s decision against using the glass material.

As we heard on Tuesday in Cupertino, both the iPhone 6 and the larger iPhone 6 Plus will ship with screens made of “ion-strengthened” glass. This was apparently Apple’s second choice.

IDC analyst Danielle Levitas says it isn’t clear when exactly the drop-test failures took place, or when Apple abandoned plans for sapphire-screened iPhones. She says the poor drop-test results, combined with the relative high cost of sapphire glass, could have made plans to ship sapphire glass phones too risky.

One researcher who covers GT Advanced Technologies, the company that was to produce the glass for the iPhone 6, wrote in a research note earlier this week that plans for the sapphire screens were cancelled in August, just weeks before the September 9 launch.

The new Apple Watches (except the “Sport” version) do use sapphire for their screens. Levitas believes that the glass for the smaller 1.5-inch and 1.7-inch watch screens was less likely to break in drop tests."

Link to Original Source
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3D-Printed Car takes it's first test drive

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a week ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "When it comes to 3D printing, new breakthroughs and new achievements are being realized almost on a daily basis. From 3D printable human tissue, to a 3D printed life-size castle, and now a 3D printed automobile, the technology never seizes to amaze.

This week, at the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) in Chicago, Arizona-based automobile manufacturer Local Motors stole the show. Over the six day span of the IMTS, the company managed to 3D print, and assemble an entire automobile, called the ‘Strati’, live in front of spectators.

Although the Strati is not the first ever car to be 3D printed, the advancements made by Local Motor with help from Cincinnati Inc, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, have produced a vehicle in days rather than months.

Last year, engineer Jim Kor designed the Urbee 2 3D printed car. The vehicle which weighed about half of what a typical automobile would weigh, was as strong as steel. What sets Local Motors’ ‘Strati’ 3D printed car apart from the likes of the Urbee 2, is the fact that they managed to print and construct the entire vehicle in just six days, whereas the Urbee 2 took 2500 print hours to complete.

This breakthrough was made possible by a machine produced by Cincinnati Inc., in cooperation with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) machine is capable of printing at speeds unheard of on traditional 3D printers. It is unbelievably able to lay down up to 40 pounds of carbon infused ABS plastic per hour, with precise accuracy. After an exciting six days of printing, in front of a live audience, the vehicle is finally complete. The only question that remained was, ‘Does it drive?”

As you can see by the Vine clips we have posted within this article, it most certainly does! The car, which features just 40 parts, drove out of McCormick Place in Chicago just moments ago. As to what Local Motors plans to do next with the Strati 3D printed car, now that the vehicle has been printed and drives like a charm, they will seek to launch production-level 3D printed vehicles for sale to the public in the coming months.

This is certainly a big step for all companies involved, as well as the 3D printing industry in general. Let us know your thoughts on this amazing accomplishment in the Local Motors 3D printed car forum thread on 3DPB.com."

Link to Original Source
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Steam-draining NASTY spreads via Twitch

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a week ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Beware geeks bearing gifts:
Eskimo infection will drop you right Inuit
By Iain Thomson, 12 Sep 2014
6

Infosec experts are warning of new malware spreading through game-streaming web hit Twitch: the software nasty subverts Steam accounts to drain player's wallets, and could take away all their precious weaponry.

The malware spreads by bombarding users of Twitch's chat feature with links to a raffle for special kit used in the popular first-person shooter Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Clicking on the proffered URL opens a Java application that claims to record the player's name and email address, and asks for permission to publish winner's name.

In fact it does none of this – and instead drops a Windows binary file onto the user's system to execute. Security biz F-Secure, which first noted the malware, has dubbed it Eskimo, and the rogue code searches for Steam accounts that may be present on the infected Windows system.

Eskimo allows its masters to buy items from the Steam account, sell the user's existing armory on the community market, accept new friends in the gaming market, and trade items between friends.

"All this is done from the victim's machine, since Steam has security checks in place for logging in or trading from a new machine," said F-Secure Labs in an advisory.

"It might be helpful for the users if Steam were to add another security check for those trading several items to a newly added friend and for selling items in the market with a low price based on a certain threshold. This will lessen the damages done by this kind of threat."

A spokesman for Amazon-owned Twitch told The Register that the firm has had one user contact them about the issue and it's not considered a widespread problem, although the company is taking steps to limit the spread of the malware.

"Security PSA: Do not click the 'csgoprize' link in chat. This is a phishing attempt to install malware and compromise your Steam account," said the firm's technical support team on Twitter.

"We will work to block that link, but be aware that variants could appear. In general, you should be wary of any links in chat." ®"

Link to Original Source
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Significant milestone in medicine: scientists reset human stem cells

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a week ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "'

Scientists led by the Wellcome Trust Medical Research Council (MRC) Cambridge Stem Cell Institute at the University of Cambridge, UK, have discovered how to successfully "reset" human pluripotent stem cells to the earliest developmental state, equivalent to cells found in an embryo before it implants in the womb (7-9 days old) — a significant milestone in regenerative medicine.
Stem cells are unspecialized cells that can develop into cells with highly specialized functions. They can be classified according to their plasticity, or developmental versatility, and range from totipotent stem cells (the most versatile type) and pluripotent to multipotent (the least versatile).

stem cells
Pluripotent stem cells have the potential to become almost any of the cell types of the body, including muscle, nerve, heart and blood.
Pluripotent stem cells have the potential to become almost any of the cell types of the body, including muscle, nerve, heart and blood. They can be produced in a lab from cells extracted from an early stage embryo or from adult cells that have been induced into a pluripotent state.

Research using human pluripotent stem cells may help generate cells and tissue for transplantation, improve understanding of human development and what causes birth defects and cancer, and change the way drugs are developed and tested for safety.

Previously, researchers have struggled to generate human pluripotent stem cells that are in a truly "blank state." Instead, they have only been able to derive cells that have advanced slightly further down the developmental pathway and exhibit characteristics of differentiation into specific cell types.

Researchers have rendered "reset cells" by rewiring the genetic circuitry in human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. The resulting cells share attributes of authentic naïve embryonic stem cells isolated from mice, suggesting that they represent the earliest stage of development.

The breakthrough, published in Cell, marks the starting point for further understanding of human development and may eventually lead to the production of safe and reproducible materials for a range of applications including cell therapies.

MRC Prof. Austin Smith, co-author of the paper, explains:

"Capturing embryonic stem cells is like stopping the developmental clock at the precise moment before they begin to turn into distinct cells and tissues."

He adds, "Scientists have perfected a reliable way of doing this with mouse cells, but human cells have proved more difficult to arrest and show subtle differences between the individual cells. It's as if the developmental clock has not stopped at the same time, and some cells are a few minutes ahead of others.""

Link to Original Source
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iPwned: How easy is it to mine Apple services, devices for data?

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Jailbreaking an iPhone to steal its secrets in the name of security research, we unleash Elcomsoft iOS Forensics Toolkit.
Sean Gallagher
Apple executives never mentioned the words "iCloud security" during the unveiling of the iPhone 6, iPhone 6+, and Apple Watch yesterday, choosing to focus on the sexier features of the upcoming iOS 8 and its connections to Apple's iCloud service. But digital safety is certainly on everyone's mind after the massive iCloud breach that resulted in many celebrity nude photos leaking across the Internet. While the company has promised fixes to both its mobile operating system and cloud storage service in the coming weeks, the perception of Apple's current security feels iffy at best.

In light of one high profile "hack," is it fair to primarily blame Apple's current setup? Is it really that easy to penetrate these defenses?

In the name of security, we did a little testing using family members as guinea pigs. To demonstrate just how much private information on an iPhone can be currently pulled from iCloud and other sources, we enlisted the help of a pair of software tools from Elcomsoft. These tools are essentially professional-level, forensic software used by law enforcement and other organizations to collect data. But to show that an attacker wouldn’t necessarily need that to gain access to phone data, we also used a pair of simpler “hacks,” attacking a family member’s account (again, with permission) by using only an iPhone and iTunes running on a Windows machine.

As things stand right now, a determined attacker will still find plenty of ways to get to iPhone data. They need to gain physical access to the device, or harvest or crack credentials to do so. But there are ways to do this that won't alert the victim. The weakest links are components of the iCloud service."

Link to Original Source
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Austalian man has microchip implanted in his hand

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Ben Slater of Brisbane is more than ready to have Apple premiere the launch of its new iPhone6 on September 9. The Australian man has already undergone a procedure two weeks ago at a local tattoo parlor that implanted a microchip the size of a grain of rice in the webbing of his left hand. Slater, who works in the field of advertising, hopes that the insertion of the radio-frequency ID chip will enable him to control an assortment of electronic devices by simply waving his left hand.
Mr Slater said the procedure to implant the microchip was painful, but over quickly.
‘I just needed to be really careful when it was healing over the course of the two weeks later so that I didn’t move it – otherwise it could have travelled in my hand,’ he said.

Slater is betting that once he has the new iPhone6 in his possession, the latest smart phone will be able to read the inserted hi-tech device to make him able to perform a number of effortless activities as if by magic. These include being able to open the front door of his home, turn on the electric lights, and connect to assorted logs containing such data as health records and names, addresses and phone numbers of his network of associates and friends, all by just waving his microchip-inserted left hand.

Alt. link: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new..."

Link to Original Source
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EA 'blurs' pirated versions of ''The Sims''

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "You wanna play The Sims 4 for free, do ya? Well, I hope you like a blurry mess.

September 3rd, 2014 Jonathan Leack
As with virtually any game—sadly—, there is a pirated version of The Sims 4 floating around the internet. Although pirates have been successful in acquiring the game for free, it’s at a cost, albeit not a monetary one.

The current cracked version of The Sims 4 has an issue that is reminding pirates that they can’t always get away with stealing. When players with the hacked version send their Sim to go to the bathroom or take a shower, either the full screen or the Sim is permanently censored. In the case of the former, the game is a blurry mess.

This has caused some funny circumstances on the internet, where players are prone to asking for help when “bugs” are encountered. There are examples of users posting on forums asking for help, questioning why their screen is blurred. These users have become the laughing stock of communities on the official forums, fan sites, and even Reddit."

Link to Original Source
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Phone Firewall Identifies Rogue Cell Towers Trying to Intercept Your Calls

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Rogue cell phone towers can track your phone and intercept your calls, and it’s only a matter of time before they’re as ubiquitous as GPS trackers. But at least now there’s a way to spot them.

A firewall developed by the German firm GSMK for its secure CryptoPhone lets people know when a rogue cell tower is connecting to their phone. It’s the first system available that can do this, though it’s currently only available for enterprise customers using Android phones.

GSMK’s CryptoPhone 500, a high-end phone that costs more than $3,000 and combines a Samsung Galaxy S3 handset with the CryptoPhone operating system, offers strong end-to-end encryption along with a specially hardened Android operating system that offers more security than other Android phones and the patented baseband firewall that can alert customers when a rogue tower has connected to their phone or turned off the mobile network’s standard encryption.

“If someone gets the alert on the CryptoPhone to say there is an intercept, it doesn’t mean their call is being listened to; but it means that they are one of the 1,000 or 10,000 people that are having their calls routed through the interceptor,” says Goldsmith. “It doesn’t mean that person is a target, but that they happen to be in a place where someone is a target.”

Unfortunately, the firewall isn’t available for every phone. It’s currently designed for use on customized phones with the rest of the CryptoPhone operating system, although the firewall can be installed separately without other parts of the operating system. But it takes two to three months to customize a phone with the CryptoPhone operating system—Goldsmith’s company has to replace the resident Android operating system with the modified CryptoPhone operating system. And the company will only do the installation for enterprise and government customers where multiple phones of the same type are being modified at once. Goldsmith says it would take too much work to do different phones individually.

He says he can envision a consumer-level app in the future that could be installed on phones by individuals. Although such an app wouldn’t have all of the same functionality as the robust firewall has, it would still be able to alert you to a rogue cell tower. There are currently no plans for an app, however."

Link to Original Source
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Pilots and Cabin Crew Have Twice the Risk of Melanoma

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about two weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Airline pilots and cabin crews appear to have twice the risk of developing the skin cancer melanoma compared to the general population, a new review of past studies finds.

This higher risk may be due to the increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation at higher altitudes, the researchers said. "At 9000 meters [about 30,000 feet], where most commercial aircraft fly, the UV level is approximately twice that of the ground," they said.

Moreover, flying over thick clouds and snow fields can further increase the amount of UV radiation that pilots and cabin crew are exposed to, the researchers said."

Link to Original Source
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So, what are THE BEST games to have in your collection?

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "I am not a 'gamer', per se. What I grew up on was 'old school' arcade/atari/arcade type games. What my question is...,

What are THE VERY BEST games to own? And it does not matter what console/system/phone based games you own. My question is...

"What are the very best games to have in your collection?""
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To Study Evolution, Scientists Raise Fish That 'Walk' on Land

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about three weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "An unusual species of fish that can walk and breathe air shows that these animals may be more capable of adapting to life on land than previously thought, researchers say.

The new findings may help explain how the ancient fish ancestors of humans colonized the land.

The evolution of the ancient fish that switched from living in water to living on land about 400 million years ago is one of the most pivotal moments in the history of the animal kingdom. These first four-limbed animals, known as stem tetrapods, ultimately gave rise to amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals.

Just how ancient fish made the shift to terrestrial life still remains largely a mystery. To learn more about what happened, scientists investigated the bichir (Polypterus senegalus), a modern African fish that has lungs for breathing air, and stubby fins it can use to pull itself along on land. The bichir possesses many traits similar to ones seen in fossils of stem tetrapods, the researchers said.

The scientists raised groups of bichir on land for eight months to find out how they would differ from bichir raised in the water. They found that the land-raised fish lifted their heads higher, held their fins closer to their bodies, took faster steps, undulated their tails less frequently and had fins that slipped less often than bichir raised in water. The land-raised fish also underwent changes in their skeletons and musculature that probably paved the way for their changes in behavior. All in all, these alterations helped bichir move more effectively on land.

The results suggest that the bichir is more malleable during its development than previously thought. This plasticity is what made this fish capable of growing up very differently depending on its environment, and the researchers suggest that stem tetrapods were similarly adaptable.

University of Ottawa biologist Emily Standen and her colleagues Hans Larsson and Trina Du of McGill University's Redpath Museum detailed their findings in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature.

Primary story at: http://www.livescience.com/475..."

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Eye Problems From Space Affect At Least 21 NASA Astronauts

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about three weeks ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "How does microgravity affect your health? One of the chief concerns of NASA astronauts these days is changes to eyesight. Some people come back from long-duration stays in space with what appears to be permanent changes, such as requiring glasses when previously they did not.

And the numbers are interesting. A few months after NASA told Universe Today that 20% of astronauts may face this problem, a new study points out that 21 U.S. astronauts that have flown on the International Space Station for long flights (which tend to be five to six months) face visual problems. These include “hyperopic shift, scotoma and choroidal folds to cotton wool spots, optic nerve sheath distension, globe flattening and edema of the optic nerve,” states the University of Houston, which is collaborating with NASA on a long-term study of astronauts while they’re in orbit.

Primary original source: http://www.uh.edu/news-events/..."

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Researchers find way to hack Gmail with 92 percent success rate

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about a month ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "CNET reports; Researchers at the University of California Riverside Bourns College of Engineering and the University of Michigan have identified a weakness they believe to exist across Android, Windows, and iOS operating systems that could allow malicious apps to obtain personal information.

Although it was tested only on an Android phone, the team believes that the method could be used across all three operating systems because all three share a similar feature: all apps can access a mobile device's shared memory.

"The assumption has always been that these apps can't interfere with each other easily," said Zhiyun Qian, an associate professor at UC Riverside. "We show that assumption is not correct and one app can in fact significantly impact another and result in harmful consequences for the user."

To demonstrate the method of attack, first a user must download an app that appears benign, such as a wallpaper, but actually contains malicious code. Once installed, the researchers can use it to access the shared memory statistics of any process, which doesn't require any special privileges."

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Scientists find fasting for few days can regenerate immune system

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 3 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Fasting for three days can regenerate the entire immune system, even in the elderly, scientists have found in a breakthrough described as remarkable.

Although fasting diets have been criticised by nutritionists, research suggests that starving the body kick-starts stem cells into producing more white blood cells, which fight off infection.

Scientists at the University of Southern California say the discovery could be particularly beneficial for those suffering from damaged immune systems, such as cancer patients on chemotherapy. It could also help the elderly whose immune systems become less effective.

The researchers say that fasting "flips a regenerative switch" which prompts stem cells to create white blood cells, essentially restoring the immune system.

"It gives the okay for stem cells to go ahead and begin proliferating and rebuild the entire system," said Valter Longo, professor of gerontology and biological sciences at the university."

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Port your holograph image into a video game using 3 Kinects

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 4 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "From “Star Trek” to “Tron,” the concept of porting yourself into a digital world has long been a dream of super high-tech science fiction storytelling.

Turns out you can do it yourself at home.

Well, kind of. Oliver Kreylos, a researcher at the Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization at U-C Davis, has created a DIY virtual reality rig using the Xbox Kinect system and the Oculus Rift head-mounted display.

Virtual Reality Sex Game Set To Stimulate

Kreylos started out by mounting three motion-sensing Kinect devices in a triangle to generate a real-time 3-D image of himself. He then sent the data into the Oculus Rift headset along with a separate data stream of a virtual office environment. {See link for video]

The result — a homebrew holodeck where you can navigate a virtual environment and look down to see your own body.

The avatar image is admittedly lo-res and glitchy, Kreylos says, but feels more “real” than motion-capture avatars.

“One of the things we’ve noticed [is that] even with low-res and low-quality 3D video, the resulting avatars just feel real, in some sense even more real than higher-quality motion-captured avatars,” Kreylos writes on his blog. “I believe it’s related to the uncanny valley principle, in that fuzzy 3D video that moves in a very lifelike fashion is more believable to the brain than high-quality avatars that don’t quite move right.”"

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Nest halts sales of high-tech smoke detector, cites fire alarm glitch

SternisheFan SternisheFan writes  |  about 6 months ago

SternisheFan (2529412) writes "Nest is halting sales of its Nest Protect fire alarm and smoke detector, citing a problem with the hand-waving feature that could delay an alarm in case of a real fire.
The company, which discovered the problems through its own internal tests, is offering to refund customers. The much-hyped Nest Protect was rolled out last year at a price point of $129.
In the next 24 hours, the company said that the Nest Wave will be automatically disabled, though the smoke and carbon monoxide alarms will continue to work."

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