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Comments

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You Have Taste Receptors In Your Lungs

Stile 65 Re:Maybe some help for Asthmatics (223 comments)

The abstract says that saccharin was tested. That's a very easy to get substance.

more than 3 years ago
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Seven Words You Can't Say On Google Instant

Stile 65 Re:Stupidest censorship tag ever. (257 comments)

Some people don't like having their porn search history attached to their account.

more than 3 years ago
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Seven Words You Can't Say On Google Instant

Stile 65 Re:I'm surprised. (257 comments)

I'm pretty sure this is a feature, not censorship.

Imagine being at work and searching for something like "white power cord" or something. Now, yes, you could go to Google Shopping to search for it, or turn off Instant if you're going to be searching for things like that, but most people won't, and do you really want your company seeing you search for "white power?"

As an example, I'm going to be raising some chickens in a while so I was looking up "how to test for salmonella." The instant search suggestion when I typed the "s" in "salmonella" was "STDs." I'd rather not be seen searching for *that* at work.

It just makes sense that Google would avoid doing things that'll trip up your company's web filters if you're searching for innocuous things that temporarily turn less innocuous due to Google's own features and default settings.

more than 3 years ago
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Why Tor Users Should Be Cautious About P2P Privacy

Stile 65 Re:Pardon my ignorance... but tor for P2P? (122 comments)

Correct. Use I2P (with I2PSnark) instead. The entire torrent stays on the mixnet. It works better because it doesn't rely on exit nodes, only relays, and more people are willing to run relays.

more than 4 years ago
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I last bought 3.5" floppy disks ...

Stile 65 Re:More than 10 years ago? (505 comments)

Even in '98 I was able to get Slackware on 9 3.5" floppies IIRC.

more than 4 years ago
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iPhone OS 4.0 Brings Multitasking, Ad Framework For Apps

Stile 65 Re:No ads please (983 comments)

Maybe you typed "Fnord" instead? :)

more than 4 years ago
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Decoding Mobile Carriers' Latest Push For Profits

Stile 65 Big Brother (64 comments)

I do not think this [phrase] means what you think it means.

more than 4 years ago
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Hollywood Stock Exchange Set To Launch In April

Stile 65 Re:American Dad (100 comments)

Idea/prediction markets are actually a hotbed of research, and there are several different theories about what could've happened with the terror attack thing. In any case, it was less about specific terror attacks and more about stability indexes for different parts of the world, etc.

By the way, there's awesome open source software under active development for running your own prediction markets and experiments with prediction markets.

more than 4 years ago
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Things To Look For In a Web Hosting Company?

Stile 65 Re:Hosts I use (456 comments)

Man, Tech.coop looks awesome. Thanks for the suggestion, I might join it shortly!

more than 4 years ago
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Things To Look For In a Web Hosting Company?

Stile 65 Re:NearlyFreeSpeech.net (456 comments)

And while I'm at it, DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES go with aventurehost.com. Seriously shitty service, and they renege on what they promise their customers. A few years ago I paid them $200 for a "lifetime" hosting account that I barely used, mainly for DNS and mail and some dev work. As of the beginning of this year, everyone who had such an account was essentially SoL and they were charging $40/year (IIRC) to continue the subscription on the accounts. I told them in no uncertain terms I wouldn't be renewing, and they still kept sending me invoices trying to get me to stay with them. They're idiots when it comes to system maintenance, too, because after every "upgrade" or "migration" they do, they expect you to put in a ticket to get your account restored. Only reason I stayed with them as long as I did was that it was essentially free after I paid for the initial "lifetime" account.

more than 4 years ago
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Things To Look For In a Web Hosting Company?

Stile 65 NearlyFreeSpeech.net (456 comments)

I've had great luck with http://nearlyfreespeech.net/ - they're security-conscious, anti-spam, pay-only-for-what-you-use, and I like their political pro-privacy and pro-free speech stance. I have a feeling most of the people here at Slashdot would be very comfortable with them. They run FBSD, not Linux, but it's really not that huge a difference for web development.

Make sure you read the caveats about what will and won't work with their service. Things like Django and RoR won't really work because of the need for a persistent process, and they don't yet have support for cron jobs (but they're working on it - it's difficult because of the way they're set up). OTOH, MVC frameworks for PHP like CodeIgniter will work just fine, and they've got Catalyst installed for Perl coders. They do make it very clear about what they do and don't support, though.

more than 4 years ago
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Intel Launches Wi-Di

Stile 65 Re:Why wouldn't... (172 comments)

A device's MAC address is ostensibly globally unique... until we start running out of 48-bit MAC addresses, anyway. There's a registry for NIC manufacturers and each manufacturer has one or more 24-bit ranges, at least as I understand it.

The way IPv6 addressing works is that usually the last 64 bits of the address are actually a "stretched" version of the MAC address of the device. See here for a good explanation.

The problem with having a permanent global IP for a device is that routing becomes impossible. You need hierarchical organization of IPs based on location, otherwise your routing tables are made up of untold numbers of /128s (or billions of /32s in the case of IPv4 addresses).

more than 4 years ago
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You Won't Recognize the Internet in 2020

Stile 65 Re:Anonymous Coward (421 comments)

Are you serious? If they limited themselves to non-routable addresses, they'd have a single /8, a single /12 and a single /24. Not to mention that after those ranges become routable, they're no longer usable inside organizations that need to have more machines than their allotted number of routable IPv4 addresses.

more than 4 years ago
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At Current Rates, Only a Few More Years' Worth of IPv4 Addresses

Stile 65 Re:For stupid reasons (460 comments)

GE's use of their 3.0.0.0/8 is exactly the same way. All their devices have public IP addresses, and they're all NATed at the firewall anyway - even for some internal communication. The NAT doesn't cause too many problems at most of the sites I've worked with (except one, getting that firewall migrated was a bitch and a half) but it's a huge waste of IP space.

Same goes for many of the customers of my former employer with full /16 blocks, too. Absolutely no reason for most companies to have that much if you're trying to conserve IPv4 address space.

That said, NAT is heinous and horrible for the end user. Peer-to-peer technologies suck when more than one device on the user's network attempts to use them at the same time (and I'm not just talking about BitTorrent, I'm talking about mixnets like Tor and I2P). I look forward to the day when I can have at least my own /64 if not my own /48 without having to tunnel it. Or several /64s - at least one for home and one for my phone and portable devices tethered thereto.

more than 4 years ago
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Car Glass Rules Could Impair Cell, GPS and Radio Signals In CA

Stile 65 Re:You mean ... (762 comments)

As above, my car's radio antenna is embedded into my windshield glass.

As for talking on a cell phone while carpooling, I carpool for lunch with coworkers and sometimes one of us (one of the non-drivers, usually) does need to take a call from work and the rest of us understand as we all work in the same place.

more than 4 years ago
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Car Glass Rules Could Impair Cell, GPS and Radio Signals In CA

Stile 65 Re:You mean ... (762 comments)

What Spectre says above. My Toyota Avalon has an antenna embedded in the windshield glass.

more than 4 years ago
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Car Glass Rules Could Impair Cell, GPS and Radio Signals In CA

Stile 65 Re:You mean ... (762 comments)

Passengers can also use cell phones, you know. Some people carpool. Also, I don't know about you, but I like to listen to the radio while driving.

more than 4 years ago
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Verizon's Challenge To the iPhone Confirmed

Stile 65 Re:Advert for the verizon network? (423 comments)

What's funny is Sprint phones can and do roam on Verizon. Since I switched to Sprint (from AT&T), I've been able to surf the web on my phone on the DC metro by roaming on Verizon towers - for free. (Of course, now GSM towers for AT&T/T-Mobile are going up in the DC metro too.)

I like how at first the OP mentions that the Droid has the same hardware as the Pre and later in the post says that users aren't impressed with the Pre's hardware.

Also, the Samsung Moment coming out in 2 weeks for Sprint has an 800MHz ARM-based CPU, where the one powering the Droid is apparently only 600MHz (I'm assuming that since the design is similar, the clock speed is a valid way to compare the performance of the CPUs; could be wrong on this).

As far as running Android 2.0, anyone with an Android phone can upgrade to that. That's one of the great things about Android in the first place.

In the end, though, I wish Motorola and Verizon good fortune launching this phone, because anything that increases Android (or Linux in general - Maemo is nice) adoption on consumer phones is cool with me. IMO Apple is so control freakish that they are firmly in "evil" territory, much more so than Microsoft.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Stile 65 Stile 65 writes  |  about 8 years ago

Stile 65 writes "According to this article, "scientists at Harvard University have used slender silicon nanowires to detect, stimulate, and inhibit nerve signals along the axons and dendrites of live mammalian neurons." The nanowires create hybrid synapses between the neurons and nanowire transistors and allow the researchers to communicate with the neural network. As a possible application, it may be possible to directly pipe video to your optic nerve with this technology in the future. According to Professor Charles M. Lieber, leader of the research group, this technology "provides a new paradigm for building sophisticated interfaces between the brain and external neural prosthetics" and "opens the possibility for hybrid circuits that couple the strengths of digital nanoelectronic and biological computing components.""
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Stile 65 Stile 65 writes  |  about 8 years ago

Stile 65 writes "Cornell researchers have made a 0.2mm-squared mirror mounted on carbon fibers that can oscillate at 2.5KHz, "caus[ing] a laser beam to scan across a range of up to 180 degrees." These can be mounted on a chip, and in combination with lasers, arrays of such mirrors on a chip can be made into a video projector. From the article: '"It would be an incredibly cheap display," [Cornell grad student Shahyaan] Desai said. And the entire device would be small enough to build into a cell phone to project an image on a wall." This display is made possible because of the innovative use of carbon fiber instead of silicon in MEMS. Unlike a standard DMD, this type of device would have one mirror per scanline, not one mirror per pixel, allowing the chip to be much smaller."

Journals

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EEStor one step closer to ultracapacitors for electric cars

Stile 65 Stile 65 writes  |  more than 6 years ago EEStor has announced additional certifications for their materials and manufacturing tools and processes to be used in ultracapacitors for ZENN electric cars. The cars are promised in fall of '09, with the ultracapacitors coming out later this year. EEStor was previously discussed here and promises to enable electric cars with a 5-minute recharge time and 80mph top speed that travel 250 miles per charge.

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Carbon Nanotube-Based NVRAM In 2-3 Years?

Stile 65 Stile 65 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

According to NanoWerk, UC Riverside researchers have come up with a memory device based on telescoping multi-walled carbon nanotubes. According to one of the researchers, "This finding leads to a promising potential to build ultrafast high-density nonvolatile memory, up to 100 gigahertz or into the terahertz range" and a prototype could be demonstrated "in the next two to three years." Similar devices from UCLA and Caltech based on bistable rotaxanes are farther along in being integrated into actual memory circuits, but tend to break after a fairly small number of position changes. Carbon nanotubes may promise more durable switches.

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Blood Vessel Shunt May Save Limbs In War

Stile 65 Stile 65 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

The FDA has just approved for military use a shunt which allows partially-severed limbs to continue to get circulation. According to the article, "For most, it won't be a matter of saving a limb outright but rather salvaging the quality of a wounded leg or arm." This is because "The tubelike device is designed to connect the two ends of a severed blood vessel, providing a temporary bridge or shunt around a wound to restore blood flow to an injured limb" according to the FDA. "The shunt may save injured limbs from amputation, since it can be implanted on the battlefield to maintain blood flow until a wounded soldier undergoes surgery, FDA officials said. Since the start of the Iraq war, more than 500 soldiers have lost limbs, many to injuries suffered in roadside bombings."

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