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Germans Can Get Free Heating From the Cloud

Streetlight Re:Great in the winter .. (148 comments)

Heat can be used to run air conditioners too if the temperature of the heat is high enough. Connect the heat output to a Sterling engine connected to a compressor or pumps for evaporative AC. This waste heat might also supplement the heat source for water heaters. I assume buildings in Germany have restrooms where folks can wash their hands. Some may even have showers.

about two weeks ago
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The Students Who Feel They Have the Right To Cheat

Streetlight Re:Worthless degrees (438 comments)

This sounds pretty good. Making a plot of data that probably fits a linear model, say from chemistry or physics, is a good start. Then plotting the data on graph paper and eye-balling a straight line and using a triangle to get the slope and intercept will give students the concepts they need when they get to linear regression, on to nonlinear curve fitting and from multivariable analysis and using derivatives to find the function for the tangent at any point on a curve. Hopefully beginning students do the simple linear stuff by hand before they get to use and perhaps program more complex functions on a computer. Programming linear least squares is pretty easy but if students have done this by hand they'll really understand what it gives them from those early "by hand" exercises.

about two weeks ago
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The Students Who Feel They Have the Right To Cheat

Streetlight Re:Worthless degrees (438 comments)

Two comments that support what you say:

1. One of my colleagues went to one of those teacher-parent conferences for his fifth grade child and asked when fractions would be taught. The teacher's response was they don't teach fractions because they're not used anymore. I think of that every time I take out a ruler or tape measure graduated in fraction of inches. My guess is that fifth grade teachers don't know enough to teach the manipulation of fractons.

2. Talked to a high school math teacher and he said that the math in first year algebra was basically grade five arithmetic. And they teach "calculus" in high school! I'm not sure what a high school calculus course must teach but I'm guessing not much. Elementary school students aren't prepared for high school. Do you expect HS grads to be prepared for college in the USA?

about two weeks ago
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Pianist Asks Washington Post To Remove Review Under "Right To Be Forgotten"

Streetlight Re:As many have pointed out... (257 comments)

I was going to write:

Subject: Two Words

Comment: Two words: Streisand Effect.

about three weeks ago
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Rite Aid and CVS Block Apple Pay and Google Wallet

Streetlight Has anyone read the debit card TOS? (558 comments)

I have. Very interesting. One "feature" of debit cards is that if you use them at a cash machine and you don't get what you ask for, too bad, you lose. Now, if you get more than you ask for the financial institution will be all over you. And of course, as pointed out by many posters, there is protection against fraud for credit cards but not debit cards, at least in the USA. These are the reasons our family does not use a debit card.

One possibility credit card issuers could implement is to deny retailers the ability to accept their credit and debit cards unless they allowed the use of credit card electronic systems for their cards such as Apple Pay or Google Wallet. It might hurt the issuers for a while but the retailers more. Returning to cash and paper checks would impose enormous overhead to retailers reconciling mounds of cash and paper checks. Large retail stores will need fork lifts to move all that paper around.

The thing that makes Apple Pay so intriguing is that each transaction produces and transmits a unique code for each purchase that does not include the credit card number. I'm assuming the code is encrypted, but even if it's not, that code will not be used again so if it's intercepted it's useless to the thief. Not sure if the Google system uses the same process, but it would be easy for them to adopt it.

about a month ago
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Will Fiber-To-the-Home Create a New Digital Divide?

Streetlight All rural residents need High Speed Internet (291 comments)

What speeds are really needed? I'd guess it depends on what a household uses Internet for and how many folks in the house will use it simultaneously. It seems to me we need to make it a national priority to get some kind of reasonable Internet speed in rural areas. Whether some areas have fiber to the home or some other technology that gives symmetrical Gigabit per second, in many areas dial up is the only thing available. Of course satellite or using a cell phone as a hot spot are possible but high cost and limited bandwidth aren't necessarily good choices. No video telephony or video streaming available there with dial up. Fifteen or 25 Megabits per second would bring rural folks pretty much up to date. My wife has cousins in rural Iowa about three miles outside a small town with those kinds of speeds from the local cable company but can only get 750 kilobits per second and 1.5 Megabits per second via DSL. Their parents live about half a mile down the same road and can only get dial up. Of course web pages now are filled with large images and it must be more than painful to load a single such page. My point is even if Gbps is made available in some areas a much more pressing need is to get reasonable responsive Internet speed to rural areas. Might be a good idea to go ahead and do it with fiber and skip coax.

about 1 month ago
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More Eye Candy Coming To Windows 10

Streetlight What's a "comprehensive feel"? (209 comments)

Does it feel me or do I feel it comprehensively? And how many CPU cycles and RAM percentages does it use to be "comprehensively" felt?

about a month ago
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Apple Doesn't Design For Yesterday

Streetlight Apple dumbs down "tomorrow" software (370 comments)

I didn't read any comments here about the common situation when Apple removes features from its "yesterday" software in new versions of its "tomorrow" software then scrambles to restore some of those features because of user complaints.

I'm not a Mac user so I don't know if it's possible, but it would be good if Apple made it easy for users to select an OS font best suited to their needs. If one has an older 21 inch iMac and maybe poor eyesight, then maybe some other font, neither Lucida nor Helvetica, would be better for them. Apple might even go so far as to make suggestions for folks with a visual handicap like macular degeneration, glaucoma or something else. Heck, Firefox on Windows allows font choice, though it's an app.

about a month ago
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The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

Streetlight Re:Things once thought impossible... (350 comments)

Sapphire is aluminum oxide. Synthetic sapphire is made in factories at high temperatures and pressures and used on expensive watches as the crystal. It is not elemental aluminum.

about a month ago
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The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

Streetlight Re:Why Cold Fusion (or something like it) Is Real (350 comments)

In Colorado Springs we used to have the Tesla Conference. Tesla worked here for awhile. Anyway, some guy had what he claimed was a perpetual motion machine that looked like one of those desk toys with a hoop or ball that continuously moved. A reporter asked if it was a perpetual motion machine why the base had all those AA batteries in it. The guy's answer was they were needed to get the thing started.

There's a reason the Patent Office started rejecting perpetual motion machines decades ago.

about a month ago
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Glut of Postdoc Researchers Stirs Quiet Crisis In Science

Streetlight Re:nothing was 'such an issue decades ago' Huh? (283 comments)

If the US population is 330,000,000 and there are 56,000 biomedical postdocs, I think the % of the population is 0.017 %. Math is not the poster' s strength. If he's a scientist, even a NYC cab driver job might be a problem keeping track of mileage or making change.

about a month and a half ago
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Belkin Router Owners Suffering Massive Outages

Streetlight Re:Ummm - did we forget the obvious? (191 comments)

Comcast does the same thing. I've experienced rare Internet outages and usually wait 20 minutes or so to call to see if there's a problem and the auto answer will confirm that but also say that one can get more information about outages by going to Comcast's home page. Hmmmm. I don't have a smart phone and I'm just out of luck. Ridiculous. I guess I could go to Starbucks or some other public hotspot, but why?

about a month and a half ago
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Adobe Spies On Users' eBook Libraries

Streetlight At first I thought this was Amzon (150 comments)

I guess when I saw the first letter in the word Adobe I thought this was Amazon. My first reaction was that you now can't buy the books you might want to read from Amazon and even if you can get them somehow, Amazon will know.

Adobe's tactic may give Amazon an idea. Too bad.

about a month and a half ago
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Microsoft's Asimov System To Monitor Users' Machines In Real Time

Streetlight My first reaction: (269 comments)

You've got to be kidding.

Someone, if not Microsoft, had better come up with an option to kill this on all Windows computers, phones, tablets, etc. I started to write this and put "kik.." in place of kill. Ya, kick this can down the road.

about 2 months ago
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Former GM Product Czar: Tesla a "Fringe Brand"

Streetlight Wasn't Lutz the chief archetect of the Volt? (267 comments)

I wouldn't be surprised if the current Tesla model hasn't outsold the Volt by some large number maybe 10 times volt sales. Which would be considered a fringe vehicle?

about 2 months ago
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Russia Pledges To Go To the Moon

Streetlight Re:The Moon is a weapons platform (197 comments)

I assume these comments are an attempt at black humor.

Immediately after noticing from any place on earth a weapons launch from the moon a laser beam of sufficient energy from the earth might be able to destroy the slow moving moon launched weapon. The speed of light is very high. Of course if the moon based weapon is a laser beam, well, things would be different.

about 2 months ago
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Users Report Warping of Apple's iPhone 6 Plus

Streetlight Thin is in. (421 comments)

Wonderful. The phone will adjust to fit its contanier, i.e., your body wear. Right now, I'm watching CNBC and they're showing the bending of the new iPhone. One idiot is saying this is by design because it can fit in your variously shaped cargo pants pockets. It's a real advantage for the larger iPhone 6 plus which needs to bend and is easier to bend because of its length.

Good grief. Apple fans in this case are crazy.

about 2 months ago
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Apple Will No Longer Unlock Most iPhones, iPads For Police

Streetlight If the cops want the data they'll try hard (504 comments)

If a court order doesn't make you turn over the codes or data on your iPhone you may end up in jail for contempt of court. If that doesn't work, and the cops really, really want the data, then you may end up on an airplane to a country that doesn't care much about your personal safety and have your sensitive body parts hooked up to electric circuits causing serious pain. This of course after the use of rubber hoses or harder objects to damage brittle parts of your body. Whether they get the data or not you may never be seen again with the explanation by the cops that you escaped and they can't find you.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Streetlight Streetlight writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Streetlight (1102081) writes "Digital Camera Review (http://www.dpreview.com/) announced May 14, 2007, that they had been acquired by amazon.com.



"We're proud and excited to announce that Dpreview has been acquired by the world's leading online retailer, Amazon.com. Started as hobby site in 1998, dpreview.com has grown to be the number one destination for anyone interested in digital cameras and digital photography. Each month dpreview.com has seven million unique visitors (over 22 million sessions) who read over 120 million pages. 'We've worked very hard over the last eight years to deliver consistently high quality content to our readers', founder Phil Askey said. 'It will be fantastic to be able to expand and build on that without compromising our quality or independence. With the support and resources of Amazon we can achieve this.'""

Journals

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Amazon.com acquires dpreview.com

Streetlight Streetlight writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Digital Camera Review (http://www.dpreview.com/) announced May 14, 2007, that they had been acquired by amazon.com.

"We're proud and excited to announce that Dpreview has been acquired by the world's leading online retailer, Amazon.com. Started as hobby site in 1998, dpreview.com has grown to be the number one destination for anyone interested in digital cameras and digital photography. Each month dpreview.com has seven million unique visitors (over 22 million sessions) who read over 120 million pages. 'We've worked very hard over the last eight years to deliver consistently high quality content to our readers', founder Phil Askey said. 'It will be fantastic to be able to expand and build on that without compromising our quality or independence. With the support and resources of Amazon we can achieve this.'"

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