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FCC May Permit Robocalls To Cell Phones -- If They Are Calling a Wrong Number

Strider- Re:Time to abandon normal phones? (217 comments)

Now Customer Owned and Maintained Equipment (COME) has let the jeanie out of the bottle and there is no way to put the jeanie back in the bottle. I you have a business trunk line and a DID even over VOIP, setting your own line display name is a normal administrative task.

Sure, but the telco should still sanity check the ANI provided to make sure it's a number permitted over that PRI (or whatever you're calling with). IE: if you order a PRI with a 100 block of DIDs, the telco should reject any number that's not within your block of DIDs. If you want outbound calls to match your toll free, fine, but you should have to register that with the telco to permit it.

about a week ago
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Parents Investigated For Neglect For Letting Kids Walk Home Alone

Strider- Re:One mile? (778 comments)

I think you know 120 yards is only used popularly in the USian scale

Or in Canada it would be 150 yards (110 yards for the playing surface, and 20 yards for each end zone). I still don't understand how the damned yanks can play on such a postage stamp of a field...

about two weeks ago
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Canadian Government Steps In To Stop Misleading Infringement Notices

Strider- Re:How is it misleading? (103 comments)

Non commercial Infringement is a civil dispute, smuggling is a crime.

Except that it wasn't a crime in Canada when he sold the seeds. Under Canadian law, the seeds themselves aren't controlled substances, so it's perfectly legal to buy and sell them. What Marc Emery did was not a crime in the location that he did it in.

about two weeks ago
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Back To the Social Media Future

Strider- Re:Wbs.net (40 comments)

In reality they were all overweight dorks in their parent's basement, or federal officers.

about two weeks ago
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SpaceX Rocket Launch Succeeds, But Landing Test Doesn't

Strider- Re:What floated by the Dragon's solar panels? (213 comments)

Probably a cover (either foil or tyvek, not sure what they use) that covers over the RCS jets while the rocket launches, then is discarded when the jet is first fired. A similar thing was occasionally seen on shuttle launches. These covers are there to keep crap (both bird, and rainwater etc...) out of the jets while the rocket is sitting on the pad.

about two weeks ago
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SpaceX Rocket Launch Succeeds, But Landing Test Doesn't

Strider- Re: Minor setback (213 comments)

But what good would it do to keep an empty fuel tank in orbit ?

Especially one that's covered in foam that's off-gassing, and shedding small bits and pieces over time. Also, never mind the fact that the tanks were built as thin and as lightweight as possible, so had they been pressurized and converted into living spaces, they would have provided little to no shielding against space debris or radiation. Also, never mind the fact that by definition they were almost empty after launch, so you would still need to haul up all the fittings, equipment, furniture, etc... that you would need to stick inside them.

The reality is that other than the strong-back that held the shuttle and the SRBs together, the ETs were really just giant aluminum cans, and were about as useful as a spent aluminum can.

about two weeks ago
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The Mystery of Glenn Seaborg's Missing Plutonium: Solved

Strider- Re:Early "naughties" (85 comments)

It ought to be the Noughties, which is the proper pun for that decade.

about two weeks ago
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Researchers "Solve" Texas Hold'Em, Create Perfect Robotic Player

Strider- Re:Nonsense! (340 comments)

How do the creators of this thing say it's perfect?

They have computed every possible game of limit hold'em poker. Based on these computations, the bot will always pick the optimal hand for the given situation (or possibly fold). Yes, it may lose a hand here or there, but the point is that over the long term, given enough hands, it will always beat imperfect (read human) players.

about two weeks ago
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Researchers "Solve" Texas Hold'Em, Create Perfect Robotic Player

Strider- Re:Perfect? Really? (340 comments)

Limit hold'em is real poker, and people actually do play it, at real casinos and everything.

Meh, it's nothing more than advanced blackjack... In real poker, you don't share cards with your adversaries, have wildcards, etc... This "hold'em" poker is just a bunch of tripe to make things look ok for TV.

about two weeks ago
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In Daring Plan, Tomorrow SpaceX To Land a Rocket On Floating Platform

Strider- Re:Re usability (151 comments)

The external tank is jettisoned too high to recover. It was thought that it could be used in space to construct something but that was never done.

As much as this played out in various types of fiction and so forth, the reality is that the tanks wouldn't have been all that useful in orbit. The foam insulation would have off-gassed significantly and dumped all sorts of crap into your orbital environment, and the tanks themselves had nowhere near the shielding required to be used for human habitation (both radiation, and micrometeorite).

about three weeks ago
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New Canadian Copyright Laws Require ISPs To Retain, Share Illegal Download Info

Strider- Re:Don't be afraid (161 comments)

According to Michael Geist, this law limits liability to $5000 for *ALL* infringements. In your example, the copyright owner would have to bring forward separate court proceedings for each of those 10,000 infringements. I doubt any court would accept that.

about three weeks ago
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The One Mistake Google Keeps Making

Strider- Re:Laughably wrong. (386 comments)

But in 10 years, every new car sold in the US, including the lowest-end Fiesta, will have options for some degree of automated driving. At the very least, there will be a driverless highway mode.

Why does everyone want to not drive? I find driving to be a particularly enjoyable task, hell I don't even mind being stuck in traffic as long as I have NPR/CBC or decent podcasts to listen to.

about a month ago
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Sony Hack Reveals MPAA's Big '$80 Million' Settlement With Hotfile Was a Lie

Strider- Re:Four Million? (117 comments)

I would prefer to pay them in Ningi.

about a month ago
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North Korean Internet Is Down

Strider- Re:Who will get (360 comments)

It kind of begs the question about what the US is still doing in South Korea anyhow. South Korea is a rich country. They can afford their own defense, but its convenient for them for Uncle Sam to pick up the tab. I have stood on the North side of the DMZ and it is clear that the US is just a thorn in the situation making everybody tense. There is no doubt that the South Koreans can adequately defend themselves against any potential "invasion" from the North. There is no reason for the US to be there. The constant presence of US marines on the DMZ make the North Koreans nervous that the South will invade them.

One of the running half-jokes amongst the US troops and marines in South Korea is their primary purpose is to keep the South Korean army in the south, not the other way around. The US influence keeps the south somewhat calm, and acts as a deterrent to the north.

about a month ago
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Cuba Says the Internet Now a Priority

Strider- Re:Celular (115 comments)

Hah, no. There's a heck of a lot more that goes on there beyond the detention facilities. The real reason though was pretty boring, I was doing some work for the on-base cable company.

about a month ago
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The Magic of Pallets

Strider- Re:Invasive Species Introduction in Wood Pallets (250 comments)

This is why there are now standards for what wood can be shipped internationally. All wood packaging entering the United States (Pallets, Cable spools, crates, etc...) is supposed to be fumigated and treated to avoid this. This is one of the things that import inspections actually do catch.

about a month ago
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Cuba Says the Internet Now a Priority

Strider- Re:Celular (115 comments)

Cellular is pretty much the only reasonable option given the lack of infrastructure. It can be installed completely wireless, aside from power. And finally, an answer to where the old phones can go.

It already is. I was at GTMO on business, and as I was walking into one of the dining facilities, my cell phone rang. Everyone looked at me like I was from Mars, until I explained that as a Canadian phone, it happily roamed onto the Cuban cell network.

about a month ago
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Launching 2015: a New Certificate Authority To Encrypt the Entire Web

Strider- Re:Sure but... (212 comments)

Exactly. I work in an environment with very limited bandwidth (1.8Mbps private satellite link servicing ~80 people). SSL by default is the bane of my existence. Right now, I've got Cisco WAAS deployed, and it adds about another 30% of effective capacity to my link, and often more. If everything goes encrypted by default, then I lose all of that. I get no caching gain, no compression gain, nothing, unless I MITM the link, which is evil and causes no end of support headaches.

Encrypt what needs to be encrypted (Authentication mechanisms, financial transactions, etc...) and leave the rest. There's no reason to encrypt cute cat pictures or grandma's chocolate chip cookie recipe.

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Dealing With VoIP Fraud/Phishing Scams?

Strider- Re:Caller ID spoofing (159 comments)

Sure, but you can verify that the ANI (originating number) belongs to a block that the customer is allowed to use. I have a PRI with two 100 blocks associated with it. I would expect that the telco would verify that the originating number I send to the switch is taken from those 200 valid numbers, if only in case someone calls 911 etc...

about 2 months ago
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No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade

Strider- Re: May I suggest (334 comments)

Remember, the old Lee Enfield rifles were never designed as sniper weapons. They were battle rifles first and foremost, which just happened to be pretty serviceable as sniper weapons. Additionally, I don't think the rifles to be replaced are scoped rifles. As far as I know they are simply standard Lee Enfield No.4's.

Years ago, I was working in a research camp in the high arctic, and the Arctic Ranger in our camp let me shoot his Lee Enfield. Amazing weapon, and the perfect thing for knocking down a polar bear. The amazing thing with the weapon I used, is that it had graphiti on the stock... Scratched into it, and nearly worn away was written "June 6, 1944." which to me indicates that the weapon had been used at Normandy. The serial number on the barrel also indicated that the weapon pre-dated the Normandy landings as well.

about 3 months ago

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