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Comments

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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Sun Re:That one was fully justified (664 comments)

I think Linus should respect the community. Just because Linus thought a certain compromise was okay doesn't mean he is allowed to make that compromise in the name of the entire community.

Tridge owed Linus nothing, and Linus' entitled response was arrogant and out of place.

I have no idea why you brought the GPL into it. It doesn't matter which free software license the Linux revision control would be under, so long as it is free software. Going proprietary for such infrastructure opens the community up for precisely the sort of danger that actually did end up happening. You cannot yank your software if it's free, regardless of what license it's under.

Shachar

yesterday
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In France, Most Comments on Gaza Conflict Yanked From Mainstream News Sites

Sun Re:Like China och USSR (490 comments)

How do you know?

I don't. I'm guessing, based on the fact that I am doing something I'm presuming is similar, and based on the fact that, were I a student today, I'd be joining in.

Mind you, the anti-Israel crowed is similarly motivated. The people spewing party lines accusing Israel of everything and anything (can be seen here on Slashdot whenever the word "Israel" is mentioned) aren't given instructions or coordinated by some central entity. They are giving us their honest opinion, misguided though it is.

This is similar to all of the above, but it being done with a political rather than an economic agenda. I don't think I know a word for organized political rants over the internet. This doesn't mean they don't happen, and aren't even rather common. But spam isn't the right word.

How about "freedom of speech"?

Someone suggested the word is "propaganda". This word has a severe negative context, because propaganda usually involves lies. At its core, however, the word merely means actively working to spread an idea (see definition no. 2). I definitely consider what I'm doing to match that narrow meaning.

Shachar

yesterday
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Sun Re:Surprise, surprise... (664 comments)

Yes. That's the one I mean.

Linus's decision to go with a proprietary solution for such a central free software project was wrong to begin with. Linus took a huge presumption, agreeing to a EULA on behalf of the entire community. As such, it was Linus's own mess he had to clean up. I think the passage of time only shows that more clearly.

Shachar

yesterday
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

Sun Re:Surprise, surprise... (664 comments)

Not that discussion again....

Linus blowing up at Andrew Tridgdell for "reverse engineering" the bitkeeper protocol comes to mind.

I will agree that this time around, the complaints are grounded. It does, indeed, seem like a compiler bug. Whether that is a reason to be so critical of gcc 4.9.0, I don't know. It's obvious a serious problem for the kernel.

Shachar

2 days ago
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In France, Most Comments on Gaza Conflict Yanked From Mainstream News Sites

Sun Re:Like China och USSR (490 comments)

This is not spam. They are doing, essentially, what I'm also doing (on a smaller scale). Essentially, find the misguided ignorant comments and try to enlighten them. Nothing there is automated, which automatically means this is not spam.

Shachar

2 days ago
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Cable Companies: We're Afraid Netflix Will Demand Payment From ISPs

Sun Re:not likely (199 comments)

Yes, it is what I'm saying. However, I don't think even if the balance turned out to be positive on Akamai's side, even that would count as "asking ISP to pay for access".

Imagine a small ISP. Not a lot of hosted content. In order to boost local content, this ISP provides co-location services at lower than usual costs. Due to the same considerations, the ISP pays a lot of peering costs (mostly incoming traffic, not a lot of outgoing traffic).

And then this ISP has an idea: I'll contact Akamai. The Akamai network accounts for over 25% of web traffic. If I have a local Akamai presence, this will greatly reduce my peering costs. Akamai's sales people are aware of this equation, of course. As a result, the deal finally negotiated mean that the ISP is paying Akamai for the privilege of hosting Akamai servers!

And the ISP is ecstatic. Yes, they are hosting a commercial server for free AND paying for the privilege, but they are saving a bundle on their peering costs. This is a straight bandwidth for bandwidth money-equivalent transaction. If Akamai started asking for too much, the ISP could tell them to take a hike. Presumably, for that to happen Akamai would have to ask more than the bandwidth costs it is saving!

Should Akamai choose to play dirty (as far as I know, they never do), they would be in a stronger position than Netflix. After all, you can get Netflix content elsewhere. Conversely, you cannot get to, e.g., apple.com without going through an Akamai server. If Akamai isn't doing it, I don't think there is any danger of Netflix doing it.

Shachar

3 days ago
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Cable Companies: We're Afraid Netflix Will Demand Payment From ISPs

Sun Re:not likely (199 comments)

To be fair, Akamai does charge some ISPs for its service. At least according to someone who actually went over the financial reports, Akamai doesn't get actual money from this, but rather a reduction in the cost to co-locate the servers.

Still, this is not the same thing as TFA. The thing that Akamai charges ISPs for is the peering traffic saved, not access to the content. If an ISP says "no", then no local Akamai cache, and the service is as good as the ISP's bandwidth to other providers that do have an Akamai presence. Neither availability nor performance are hindered by refusing to do business with Akamai, except losing the obvious advantage of a local cache.

Disclaimer:
I (currently) works for Akamai. This post, however, is not affiliated with Akamai in any way or form. The opinions do not represent those of my employer, nor does the information employed come from any data not publicly available.

Shachar

3 days ago
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The NSA's New Partner In Spying: Saudi Arabia's Brutal State Police

Sun Re:Heck, we probably already fund them (125 comments)

Israel is a racist, fascist little hole, promoting genocide and ethnic cleansing.

I always wonder about people who say that. Can you, please, explain, if Israel is after genocide, how come there are so few Palestinian casualties? I mean, the number, while indeed extremely high for warfare, don't even begin to threaten even natural growth.

Either Israel is completely incompetent at performing genocide, or genocide was never the intention, and you (and your ilk) just made it up to make Israel sound bad.

Shachar

3 days ago
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A Skeptical View of Israel's Iron Dome Rocket Defense System

Sun Re:Subject bait (379 comments)

I have to admit I did wonder about it.

Shachar

about two weeks ago
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A Skeptical View of Israel's Iron Dome Rocket Defense System

Sun Re:Subject bait (379 comments)

Because:
A. No place in Israel is truely safe.
During the second Lebanon war, the most safe place was around where I live (maximal distance from both Gaza and Lebanon). I live 5 Kilometers from the green line. If the Palestinians around my area decide to join in, my house will be in more danger than Dotan's.

B. Not living in Israel is not really an option.
Obviously, for some, it is. Long term, however, history showed that Jews don't fare well when not under self government. Thankfully, antisemitism suffered a major blow back after the Nazies lost WWII, and so people who grew up in western countries don't think of it as something real. It is illegitimate, and still fairly rare. That is a good thing. Sadly, it is also very far from non-existing. Jews in many western European countries don't wear external religious signs, and if they do, experience daily harassement. What's more, the current trends are not promising.

Maintaining Israel is a survival need. The fact that Israel's current strength pushes the danger back quite a bit is proof that the need is real, not vice versa.

Shachar

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

Sun Re:Sue them for all they're worth (495 comments)

Indeed. They claim, and you have to agree that there is some substance to that claim, that giving the victims prior notice will allow them to delete the pirated software from their computer, thus destroying evidence.

I hate the BSA and their way of operation, but within the framework they work in, I cannot refute that claim.

This is irrelevant to this case.

Shachar

about a month ago
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Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

Sun Re:Sue them for all they're worth (495 comments)

Its not the judges problem to collect any evidence but to judge based on written laws. NO-IP was a no show that's evidence enough for me and its law they can be ruled against. Honest people show up in court dishonest don't.

They were not told of the hearing. How could they possibly show?

Shachar

about a month ago
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Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

Sun Re:Sue them for all they're worth (495 comments)

Ex parte petitions should only be used in the most extreme of circumstances and there should be a high burden of proof before a court grants them.

Again, IANAL.

Still, how can you have a high burden of proof? In an adverserial system, the only things you can prove need two opposing parties to present their case. As such, an ex-parte request does not contain proof at all (how can it?)

Instead, it contains claims backed by sworn testimony. The judge examines these claims in the light most favorable to the non-present party, but otherwise within the context of the claims presented by the moving party.

In other words, you cannot second guess the judge's decision without looking at what MS actually wrote in its TRO request. If (as likely happened) MS wrote that no-ip do not remove the offending domains, and that these domains are used on a daily basis to cause huge harm, then a reasonable judge (who, I might remind you, is not technically savvy, and may not realize the implications of granting this order are disrupting no-ip's business) might conclude that granting this Temporary Restraining Order is reasonable.

So, once again, I think MS were acting like douches. I have no idea whether the judge acted reasonably, and cannot know without looking at MS's petition.

Shachar

about a month ago
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Microsoft Takes Down No-IP.com Domains

Sun Re:Sue them for all they're worth (495 comments)

Also, apparently No-ip didn't appear when summoned. Apparently, that's kinda of a big no-no. Maybe next time they will buy their domains somewhere with proper laws.

IANAL. All of this is from following legal procedures.

Not showing up is a big no-no. A judge can, usually, assume that the party not showing up has nothing to say in the matter, and just accept the petition as is. This is, however, not what happened here. From the first link:

On June 19, Microsoft filed for an ex parte temporary restraining order (TRO) from the U.S. District Court for Nevada against No-IP.

Emphasis mine.

An Ex-Parte petition is filed without the other side being given a chance to answer. This is outrageous act by Microsoft. You ask for an ex-part hearing when there is danger that the other side, if given prior warning of your requested subpoena, will destroy evidence. Since Microsoft is claiming that no-ip are unknowingly hosting malware, this simply wrong.

Before you go to blame the judge, however, please bear in mind that he can only rule based on the petitions before him. Presumably, a two-party hearing will be held soon, and then things can, and should, go differently. Also, the judge should have ordered Microsoft to place some money in escrow, which no-ip will automatically get in case the temporary restraining order is found to be unjustified.

What I'm saying is that we don't have enough information so far to conclude that the judge did anything wrong, but the first link, written by Microsoft, clearly shows MS to be douche bags in this case.

Shachar

about a month ago
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Exploiting Wildcards On Linux/Unix

Sun Re:what about? (215 comments)

At most, this will delete one directory above the one you're in. If you're in e.g. /home/shachar, this will delete /home, but not /usr or /etc.

Shachar

about a month ago
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Exploiting Wildcards On Linux/Unix

Sun Re:Question... -- ? (215 comments)

The -- end of options option is a GNU getopt extension. It is, if memory serves me correctly, not part of any standard. This means that program that were not compiled with glibc, or programs that do not use getopt/getopt_long, may or may not honor it.

Even by simply looking at the man page, it is easy to spot programs that don't use getopt. Any program that accept multi-letter options with one minus sign is, obviously, not using getopt (e.g. gcc, find).

Then there is git. Git uses -- to mean "no revisions after this point. Any remaining argument must be a file name". This is almost, but not quite, what -- means for getopt. I don't even know what underlying parsing engine they are using (could be getopt with the "no options after first argument" option set).

The "./*" feature is a more global workaround, if it is applicable.

Shachar

about a month ago
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Exploiting Wildcards On Linux/Unix

Sun Re:what about? (215 comments)

On my system (Debian GNU/Linux Jessie with Bash version 4.3.11), ls -lad *.* does not return either "." or "..". This is unlike ".*", which return both.

I have not found the precise rules of how * is expanded, but it seems pretty universal that if the pattern doesn't begin with a dot, files beginning with a dot are not matched.

Other systems (and, more to the point, shells) might behave differently, of course.

Shachar

about a month ago
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Maglev Personal Transportation System Set For Trial In Tel Aviv

Sun Re:Vaporware. Totally. (81 comments)

While I agree with a lot of what you said, it is not completely true.

Jerusalem now has an (above ground, so not technically a subway) train throughout the city. It did take longer than planned, (and I believe was over budget too), but did, finally, happen. It definitely took more than one mayoral tenure to complete.

Yes, the Tel Aviv subway is now a running joke, and has been for about two decades. Then again, so was the Tel Aviv central bus station (took 40 years to complete and is under utilized, but complete it, eventually, did).

Just because something is a running joke doesn't mean it will not, eventually, happen. See "Duke Nukem Forever".

Shachar

about a month ago
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Age Discrimination In the Tech Industry

Sun Re:Families come first (370 comments)

Your drivel shows a remarkably consistent level of insightfulness. As anyone who has ever done ISO-9000 knows, consistency is a vital first step. Only once that is achieved, can one also aim for quality. Congratulations! You are half way there!

It's not all good news, I'm afraid. While I can sort of see which (or is that "whose"?) ass you pulled most of your incorrect assumptions from, I am dumbfounded in trying to figure out where you got the assumption that my current wife is a trophy wife.

This assumption is completely incorrect, but, as I said, that is no different than the rest of your comment. What is worse, and reflects really badly on your potential as a truly effective troll, is that there is nothing to suggest it.

Your comment started so well, casting doubt on my ability to be happy (at least I think that's what you said. The missing word is actually important there), my ability as a father, fear of mortality and of being insignificant. Those are universal fears, and you can't really go wrong by pushing those buttons. And then you had to put that "trophy wife" in there.

Not only is this unlikely to be true, reducing the likely hurt I'm likely to feel from your troll, but it also hurts your logic. If my wife is a trophy wife, then the age difference between her and my kid isn't so big.

Please take this comment as the constructive criticism it is meant to be. Trolling, like any other art form, requires practice to get right. Judging from your comments on other threads, I'm sure you're well on your way to perfection. Keep at it. You'll get it in the end!

Oh, and thanks for the sig comment. I've been meaning to do something about it for quite some time, but was not sure what. I just removed it altogether for the time being.

Shachar

about a month ago
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Age Discrimination In the Tech Industry

Sun Re:Families come first (370 comments)

A LOT of very stupid people are waiting until they are in their late 30's or 40's to have kids.. Oh boy, the joy of having to raise children until retirement age.. I'll instead enjoy the money and spare time of being 45 and my kids gone...

As one such stupid person, I can tell you. Oh, how I wish I had the smarts to to go ahead and make a child with my !@#%!@#$ crazy first wife, instead of divorcing her, spending time looking for a right one that will be, well, right, and only then having a child.

I'm sure me, my first wife, and my hypothetical children would have been so much happier for having a younger dad. Obviously, a younger dad is preferrable to growing up in a happy family.

Shachar

about a month ago

Submissions

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France Bans Pro-Palestinian Demonstrations

Sun Sun writes  |  about a week ago

Sun (104778) writes "Citing the violence these demonstrations deteriorate into, the French government has placed a ban on all pro-Palestinian demonstrations. The step is receiving criticism from all sides of this particular conflict.

One has to wonder whether more traditional means of crowd control wouldn't be more appropriate, such as limiting the number of participants or assigning locations not next to Jewish centers."

Link to Original Source
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Israel Channel 10 Report Child Abduction Urban Legand as News

Sun Sun writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Sun writes "Israel's Channel 10 news reported Sunday of an attempted abduction of a 9 years old child was from the Disney World park. The reporter, Sivan Cohen, reports (video in Hebrew in this article) that when the parents found out the child went missing, the turned to park officials who closed down the gates and asked them to look only at the children's shoes. Using the shoes, the child was found in a bathroom with her head shaved and clothes changed. The reporter took the effort to mention this sounds like an urban legand, but it isn't.

Except, of course, it is. Channel 10 took off line all references to the story, and on Monday apologized for the incorrect report. The reporter was suspended, and the official response blamed the "parents" that reported this.

Still, one would hope that with a story that smells so strongly of hoax that a serious news outlet would do some fact checking before reporting."

Link to Original Source
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PrimeSense Opening Up SDK (Works with Kinect)

Sun Sun writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Sun writes "It seems like PrimeSense (the chip producer behind the Kinect) have released an SDK to the general public. Some things, like the drivers, were completely open sourced, while others, like skeleton tracking, user extraction and hand tracking are available free of charge (Windows and Ubuntu 32 and 64 bit). The forum seems to aim at being hardware neutral, but the actual drivers available right now are only for the PrimeSense chip (but do work with the Kinect hardware, which is about 50$ cheaper than the reference implementation they sell on the site). There is also a video of skeleton tracking in action.

Too late to win the original driver bounty, but maybe in time to win some of the later ones."

Link to Original Source
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New copyright law in Israel - mostly good news

Sun Sun writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Sun writes "Last Monday the Knesset (the Israeli parliament) passed the new copyright law, scheduled to go into effect in half a year. The previous law was passed in England in 1911, and was enacted in (then Palestine) in 1922.

The bad news:
  • Copyright period was lengthened for photographs was extended to match all other rights. All copyright now lasts life+70 years, except actual recordings which last 50 years.
  • "Making available" was explicitly listed as a protected right. On the flip side, the fact that another country found it necessary to list this right explicitly may aid people defending themselves in the US.
  • Work created for the government is copyrighted, albeit with a shortened copyright period of 50 years.


The good news:
  • No anti-circumvention clauses, and not for lack of trying. The Israeli record federation tried to pass such a law, with a lot of backing from the proprietary software industry. The opponents included the Israeli ISOC chapter, as well as Hamakor (represented, among others, by myself). The most important opponent, however, was the ministry of justice! It is too optimistic to assume we heard the last word on this, but for the moment, Israel is DMCA free.
  • Explicit exclusion from copyright of control over reverse engineering for interoperability and for research purposes. Again, this one had a lot of fighting from the software industry (mostly Microsoft and Retalix), but again common sense prevailed. This time a lot of help was received from the academic community, with several professors stepping forward to state that without ability to reverse engineer, research would come to a halt.
  • Fair use was expanded. The 1911 law had a limited "close" list of what would be considered "fair use". The new law allows the court to expand the list based on economical and other considerations. The list of considerations is, itself, also subject to court discretion and expansion.
  • Transient copies — the specifically excludes transient copies made for the purpose of a legitimate activity from being controlled by the copyright holder. The fact that, in order to run a program, the bits are copied from the hard disk to the RAM can no longer be used in order to control what can be done with a program.


All in all, this is a huge improvement even over the existing law. As someone who was present during some of the deliberations, and actively participated, I can say that I think that the most important law in the Israeli codex is the law that governs how much money a party can receive in campaign contributions. Despite at least three of the last four prime ministers got into hot water over violating this law, the end result is that the Israeli legislator is, for the most part, open to hear what is best for EVERYONE, and does care to do the right thing. Interest groups can still try to present their case in a convincing manner, but the fact that such humble resources, such as a bunch of volunteers from Hamakor and from the academic world, could make a difference is a very encouraging sign."
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Sun Sun writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Sun writes "I have just published a suggestion for a comment mechanism that will, I think, advance us an important step toward stopping comment spam in blogs. Non-spam comments welcome.

In a nutshell, commenters are asked to have their computer solve a cryptographic riddle, thus increasing the cost of posting spam to blogs as comments. The idea is not new, as such. I have seen similar suggestions for email. Unlike email, however, I believe it is feasible for blog comments."
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Sun Sun writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Sun writes "This really is from the "unsubstantiated rumours" department.

The Israeli online newspaper "Daily Maily" reports (content in Hebrew) that Information Week reports that Adobe announced it intends to open source ActionScript Virtual Machine, the engine behind Flash Player. According to Daily Maily, it will be integrated into Mozilla as a new open source project called "Tamarin". It is not clear whether this new engine is supposed to serve Flash or JavaScript content, however.

I am sorry about the long list of references, but aside from the link at Daily Maily, I have not managed to pick up a single reference to this piece of news, from either Adobe site or the Mozilla site. Any collaborating evidence would be appreciated."

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