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US States Edge Toward Cryptocoin Regulation

SuricouRaven Re:Regulationzzzzzzzzz... (134 comments)

And the politically undesireable - Wikileaks had trouble with payment processors too.

9 hours ago
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Off the Florida Coast, Astronauts Train For Asteroid Mission

SuricouRaven Re:Send a robot (72 comments)

Some of those rocks are bloody big rocks. Kilometers across. They'd shrug off a nuclear bomb, and it's hard to come up with an engine that can even exert enough delta-m to shift their path significantly.

10 hours ago
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US States Edge Toward Cryptocoin Regulation

SuricouRaven Re:Can we just recognize it as currency and be don (134 comments)

Enforcement would be very difficult. A forensic accountant could pierce the trail together given enough time, yes - but the cost of paying someone to spend days going through the blockchain and trying to prove each of these addresses belongs to a certain individual would be far greater than the cost of subpoenaing a suspect's bank account and getting instant proof of illicit income. The higher the cost of enforcement, the fewer cases the government can bring, and the less risky the crime becomes - potentially reaching the level of copyright infringement, where tens of millions completly ignore the law because they know their chance of getting caught is miniscule.

10 hours ago
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US States Edge Toward Cryptocoin Regulation

SuricouRaven Re:Regulationzzzzzzzzz... (134 comments)

It's a currency designed to be difficult to regulate. Of course the first adoptors are going to be those to whome conventional finance is unavailable. Those on the fringes of the law, or in outright violation of it. Not just drugs and violence though - The Pirate Bay accepts bitcoin donations, and there are a number of internet gambling sites accepting payment in it to draw the business of those living in states where internet gambling is prohibited.

People don't just adopt a new techology, much less a new finance paradigm, without a good reason. The big hope of the bitcoin community is that the paranoids and outcasts may be the first to adopt, but they will then form the core around which a new legitimate economy can cluster. That does seem to be happening, as an increasing number of legitimate companies start accepting bitcoin as a promotional measure. It gets them press coverage.

10 hours ago
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US States Edge Toward Cryptocoin Regulation

SuricouRaven Re:How to regulate something that is unregulateabl (134 comments)

Money has been virtual a lot longer than that. Even cash is virtual: The physical tokens are just representative of something more abstract. The last time money was physical was when it was on the gold standard - and even then very few people actually took up the promise backing it and swapped their notes for gold.

10 hours ago
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

SuricouRaven Re:I know you're trying to be funny, but... (651 comments)

Isn't linux running more servers on the internet than any other OS? Webservers, certainly. And databases, a lot of application servers.

The only place where Windows server rules is for the corporate LAN, because it's built to run active directory and uses the same permission structure. If you've got Windows desktops, you want Windows server to control and coordinate them all.

Linux's failure on the desktop isn't really a technical issue, it's a business issue. It's near-impossible to push aside an entrenched player in any field where compatibility is an issue. The staff training costs alone are a nightmare. Microsoft got in at a critical time (Just as the desktop was going huge) and managed to win by a combination of being 'good enough' and some excellent (If ruthless, given how they sabotaged OS/2) business skills - and once in, they stuck.

yesterday
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Off the Florida Coast, Astronauts Train For Asteroid Mission

SuricouRaven Re:Useless Internet (72 comments)

It's not strictly speaking a need, but it has a psychological effect. No-sex often makes for unhappy people. Even those without a partner tend to masturbate.

yesterday
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Off the Florida Coast, Astronauts Train For Asteroid Mission

SuricouRaven Re:Useless Internet (72 comments)

I don't see why erection wouldn't be possible - it works perfectly well when lying down under one gravity. You'd just need to hold on, or put one of those sleeping bags to another use to avoid drifting apart and have something to thrust against.

yesterday
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Off the Florida Coast, Astronauts Train For Asteroid Mission

SuricouRaven Re:Send a robot (72 comments)

There are many big rocks out there. One of them is on a collision course. When it is discovered, there will follow a final chorus of 'I told you so.'

yesterday
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Linus Torvalds: "GCC 4.9.0 Seems To Be Terminally Broken"

SuricouRaven Re:I know you're trying to be funny, but... (651 comments)

His manner is coarse, but you must admit that he's gotten the job done. Linux advances on schedule, patches get incorporated, code gets tested, and all proceeds smoothly.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: What Would You Do With Half a Rack of Server Space?

SuricouRaven Re:Bitcoin, rent, tor (206 comments)

It's an issue. It's routine practice when investigating internet crimes to execute search warrants via raids in order to prevent destruction of evidence. If they knock nicely, the suspect can have time to overwrite files or destroy media. Storming the home and forcing everyone to the ground at gunpoint may seem a bit heavy-handed (And occasionally there is a misunderstanding resulting in a shooting) but it's the only way to ensure evidence isn't destroyed.

The concern with Tor exit nodes is that if someone does get up to something illegal via your node, it'll be traced back to you. There have been a couple of well-documented incidents, usually involving distribution of child pornography. Nothing that would stick in court, but even for the innocent getting caught up in such an investigation is a disaster. Reputation tainted, a permanent mark on the record that makes getting a job harder even if no charges are filed, and the loss of everything you own with a hard drive or flash memory - at least until the police forensics finish with it in about five years.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: What Would You Do With Half a Rack of Server Space?

SuricouRaven Re:Bitcoin, rent, tor (206 comments)

TOR exit nodes are in very short supply, and as a company you already have the protection of incorporation that prevents the biggest fear of exit operators (and the reason there are so few), being caught up in an investigation by police who kick down doors first and ask questions later.

Legally safe, if you've enough storage, Freenet could use more massive-storage cache nodes. Freenet has no exit to the non-freenet web, so you're not risking getting caught up in any investigation. But neither of these options involve making a profit, so you're dependent upon having someone in management who buys the ideological argument.

Really, the best options I can imagine for them profit-wise are to either flog the gear on eBay or to repurpose it into some new useful role. Perhaps a local backup server, in case of cloud or connectivity failure.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: What Would You Do With Half a Rack of Server Space?

SuricouRaven Re:Good luck (206 comments)

You can't even get one coin using ASICs alone, unless you buy some three-thousand-dollar monster box packed with row upon row of them. And even then it would take weeks.

Bitcoin mining now is done using pools.

yesterday
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Greenpeace: Amazon Fire Burns More Coal and Gas Than It Should

SuricouRaven Re:Hipsterism at its finest (worst?) (281 comments)

Power consumption is proportional to usage, plus a constant. It takes up a little power every time the file is streamed - and it also uses up precious network capacity, which on a larger scale means the network provider has to install more cells and more equipment.

yesterday
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Greenpeace: Amazon Fire Burns More Coal and Gas Than It Should

SuricouRaven Re:Hipsterism at its finest (worst?) (281 comments)

But you need to account for getting the data there and back too. Radio power, network equipment power consumption. I don't know how much energy it takes to build, ship and operate an SD card - but it doesn't sound implausible that it could save as much or more over the course of a three-year usage life. People listen to a lot of music on their phones - how much power is taken to stream some music for a hour's commuting five days a week/

2 days ago
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Greenpeace: Amazon Fire Burns More Coal and Gas Than It Should

SuricouRaven Re:Hipsterism at its finest (worst?) (281 comments)

Rules of Data:
1. If you don't have it twice, you don't have it.
2. If you can't find it, you don't have it.
3. If you can't read it, you don't have it.

2 days ago
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Greenpeace: Amazon Fire Burns More Coal and Gas Than It Should

SuricouRaven Re:Hipsterism at its finest (worst?) (281 comments)

Business reasons. You can sell a card or a download, but a cloud service is a recurring payment.

2 days ago
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Greenpeace: Amazon Fire Burns More Coal and Gas Than It Should

SuricouRaven Re: Clever editors. (281 comments)

Many environmental activists now regard nuclear as a suitable solution for baseload power, on the grounds that it may still have some pollution and safely issues but it's far superior in those aspects to fossil fuels. You are correct though: Greenpeace still remains in opposition.

2 days ago
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Greenpeace: Amazon Fire Burns More Coal and Gas Than It Should

SuricouRaven Re: Clever editors. (281 comments)

The good news there is that the developing world, while experiencing a population boom, is also experiencing declining fertility as a consequence of cultural change. It's difficult to estimate, but depending which statistician you ask it's probably going to stabilise at a peak of 10-20 billion globally.

Nothing destroys fertility quite like gender equality combined with access to contraception. Getting women into education and the workplace takes them out of the breeding game for a few years and reduces average family size.

2 days ago
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Australian Government Moving Forward With Anti-Piracy Mandate For ISPs

SuricouRaven Re:TheBiggestOffender (121 comments)

They'll only block sites that don't have the money to put up a fight.

2 days ago

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