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Comments

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China Cleans Up Spam Problem

TFGeditor Re:didn't it come from the states? (69 comments)

I have been firewalling China (the whole world, actually, except North American/ARIN registrants) for years on my company's servers. That alone cuts our spam load by 75-80 percent. RBLs and other measures take care of most of the rest, and server logs indicate less than 3 percent of spam gets through. That seems to be the equilibrium point between blocking spam and false positives.

more than 3 years ago
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Which Language To Learn?

TFGeditor Re:Really? (897 comments)

Adding yet another (unnecessary) layer to an already bloated setup.
 

more than 3 years ago
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Which Language To Learn?

TFGeditor Re:Really? (897 comments)

Well, I think the fact that PHP and other non-MS developments are not locked into a single OS platform carries a lot of weight. Develope a website in .NET, and you are stuck with an MS OS forever. With PHP et al, you can choose a Linux, MS, or any other compatible server setup.

more than 3 years ago
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Which Language To Learn?

TFGeditor Re:Really? (897 comments)

Programming and web development are not really my main gig. I just started this more as a favor to a very good client in my "day job" consult work.

My assembly language skills were on Data General and DEC mini computers, so do not translate very well to modern processors/languages.

Very old nerd nerd here. "I knew Alan Turing. Alan Turing was a friend of mine...."

more than 3 years ago
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Which Language To Learn?

TFGeditor Re:Really? (897 comments)

Troll? Really? For not liking .NET or liking PHP et al?

more than 3 years ago
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Which Language To Learn?

TFGeditor Re:Really? (897 comments)

Yes, it is ASP.NET, so maybe I am painting with too broad a brush.

Nonetheless, I still prefer PHP and other open languages to the cloistered MS offerings.

more than 3 years ago
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Which Language To Learn?

TFGeditor Re:Really? (897 comments)

I recently had to revisit my former life in programming and "update" my language repertoire (from assembly language and FORTRAN) in order to maintain and update a client's website--written in .NET. I am slowly converting everything to PHP and Javascript because, basically, .NET sucks more ways than a French whorehouse.

more than 3 years ago
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Which Language To Learn?

TFGeditor Re:Really? (897 comments)

Septic tank technician? (a.k.a. "honey hauler")

more than 3 years ago
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Sentence Spacing — 1 Space or 2?

TFGeditor The real answer (814 comments)

Somewhere in the miasma of bandwidth-wasting childish prattle, someone might have answered this, but I'll go anyway.

Back in the day when print press type was set by hand, it was difficult to keep track of certain things--partly because the type was set backward. It was, for instance, difficult to distinguish between "p" an "q" when viewed backward, hence the phrase, Mind your p's and q's.

Likewise, it was difficult to discern the beginning and end of sentences, further compounded by limited font availability. Editors, too, who spent/spend all day reading/correcting manuscripts found them difficult to read after a while, so easy-to-read manuscripts received preferential treatment. Thus, doubles-spaced sentences and paragraphs became the standard.

Today, with desktop publishing and automatic text justification, extra spaces are unnecessary and actually counter productive. So, if banging out something on a typewriter, two spaces. In a word processor, one space.

(Full disclosure: I am the editor of a print magazine as well as a book author.)

more than 4 years ago
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TI Calculator DRM Defeated

TFGeditor Re:Well... (234 comments)

Why the parent is modded "Offtopic" is beyond me. TI's draconian attempt to control what consumers do with, to, or on property that they purchased and own is reprehensible.

So, fuck you TI, indeed.

more than 4 years ago
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Mythbusters "Peeing On 3rd Rail" Busted

TFGeditor Spiraling Urine (17 comments)

The human urethra imparts a spiral/twist to the urine stream to make it, well, stream instead of dribbling. MythBusters failed to recognize/account for this in the original tests. (Actually, they fail in fundamental things like this rather often.)

more than 4 years ago
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Mythbusters "Peeing On 3rd Rail" Busted

TFGeditor Re:Apples and Oranges (17 comments)

Wrong. Voltage in overhead power transmission lines (at least in the U.S.) is 7200 volts minimum per line. A single overhead line is 7200 volts, and a pair is 14,400 (180-degree phase). Even if the urine steam is broken into a series of droplets, 7200 is sufficient voltage to arc between droplets, and obviously enough current to melt you Indiana Jones-Nazi style.
     

more than 4 years ago
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Are You Using SPF Records?

TFGeditor SPF, DKIM, Best Practices, none of it matters... (263 comments)

...if a handful of AOL users flag your email as spam, AOL will not whitelist your server. This includes double-opt in email sent to verify registration for a newsletter or service. I swear to Bob, AOL use will mark these as spam then complain because they cannot register for your site.

We now simply tell potential registrants who enter an AOL address, "Sorry, get a real email service then we will talk."

more than 4 years ago
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The Jet Fighter Laser Cannon

TFGeditor Re:...and so does "final stage prior to..." (464 comments)

No, the summary used it exactly as the OP stated, and said use was incorrect. Pulling a lame justification out of your ass doesn't change that.

more than 4 years ago
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Despite Gates' Prediction, Spam Far From a Thing of the Past

TFGeditor Re:The funny thing is (198 comments)

FTFA: "Virtually all spam, of course, is sent from innocent computers that have been compromised by hackers," Cluley wrote.

Since when are non-sentient boxes capable of "innocence" or "guilt"? The OWNERS of those boxes are guilty of negligent vulnerability.

It should be sufficiently technologically difficult to install/allow installation of malware to make it impossible for the "average user" to do so. Anyone with sufficiently advanced knowledge to install/allow installation of malware would presumably know better.
 

more than 5 years ago
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Despite Gates' Prediction, Spam Far From a Thing of the Past

TFGeditor Re:Getting rid of SPAM (198 comments)

If you are in the U.S. serving a U.S. customer base, offer (as an option) the ability to block ALL non-U.S. IP addresses. We use this on our server, and it reduces spam by 90-95 percent. Most spam that gets past this by relaying through unsecure U.S. servers gets mopped up by other methods (Baysian filtering, keyword matching, etc,) so that maybe one spam out of 500 makes it to inboxes.

more than 5 years ago
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China Makes Arrests To Stop Internet Porn

TFGeditor No Foreign Aid = Reduced Population (204 comments)

Western do-gooders bringing food and medical care to third-world countries accounts for much of population growth. Having lots of kids (with multiple wives, in some cases) has been the encouraged norm for centuries because it was the only way to ensure at least one or two survived to adulthood (disease, famine, and infant mortality, you know).

Enter the Western do-gooders. Suddenly, almost all children survived to adulthood, and the average life expectancy increased dramatically. Population boom, but the available resources remained the same.

So, if you want to solve third-world overpopulation problems, cut off the foreign aid and let natural equilibrium with the environment resume.

Harsh, but nonetheless true--and effective.

more than 5 years ago
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The Best Burglar Alarm In History

TFGeditor Re:Must be a slow news day, this is old (137 comments)

"And how come we are not talking about the shoe that almost hit George Bush instead."

Uh, because that is a topic for another thread and not relevant to this one?

more than 5 years ago
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The Best Burglar Alarm In History

TFGeditor Re:Idle (137 comments)

To parrot/paraphrase what others have already written, lighten up and enjoy the refreshing mix of tech, freshness, and humor.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Microsoft Managed Networks IP/Email Routing?

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 3 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "While working on a spam blacklist, I noticed a curious thing: All email sent through a Microsoft Managed Network account gets routed through the Microsoft London, Great Britain, network center (IP 94.245.64.0 — 94.245.127.255) as well as a number of other nodes for a ridiculous number of hops. It seems odd that even point-to-point intra-North American traffic would route through London. Accounts that use the Managed Network service are oblivious to this, and some of them are “name” corporations such as Administaff.

Does the formidable Slashdot collective intelligence have any idea why Microsoft does this?"
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When and how did you Discover Google?

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TFGeditor writes "It is said that most people alive when JFK was killed remember where they were when they heard the news. It recently occurred to me that I remember precisely where and how I discovered Google--an ad on the Boston Globe (www.boston.com) website back in the 1990s. I though it an odd name, but clicked the ad link anyway to discover a vastly superior search engine to the Momma.com and Lycos.com engines I was using at the time. Where, when, and how did you discover Google?"
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Flat Earth True Believers: Real or Hoax?

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "In the 21st Century, the term "flat-earther" is used to describe someone who is spectacularly — and seemingly wilfully — ignorant. But there is a group of people who claim they believe the planet really is flat. Are they really out there or is it all an elaborate prank? Nasa is celebrating its 50th birthday with much fanfare and pictures of past glories. But in half a century of extraordinary images of space, one stands out. On 24 December 1968, the crew of the Apollo 8 mission took a photo now known as Earthrise. To many, this beautiful blue sphere viewed from the moon's orbit is a perfect visual summary of why it is right to strive to go into space. Not to everybody though. There are people who say they think this image is fake — part of a worldwide conspiracy by space agencies, governments and scientists. Welcome to the world of the flat-earther."
Link to Original Source
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Deaf Couple Wants to Abort "Hearing" Fetus

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "Amniocentesis, ultrasound imaging, and other technologies give expectant couples the ability to pre-screen fetuses for birth defects and make medical decisions accordingly — including (in some jurisdictions) aborting a "defective" fetus. Now a deaf couple, who wants a deaf child, http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2008/mar/09/genetics.medicalresearch wants to use that technology to weed out what they view as "defective" hearing-capable fetuses, raising a firestorm of controversey and posing intrguing ethics questions. Pro-lifers, obviously, are in opposition to the couple's notions, but isn't "deaf society" entitled to the same rights and priviledges as "hearing society"?"
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Chinese net surfers expose govt. photo phakery

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "The Wall Street Journal http://online.wsj.com/article/SB120363429707884255.html?mod=googlenews_wsj has the story about a spectacular photograph allegedly depicting a herd of Tibetan antelope running adjacent to a high-speed train that won a Top 10 'photo of the year' award from CCTV, China's state-run television network. The photo now has been exposed as a Photoshopped scam. Chinese Internet users discovered and exposed the fakery. The government has issued a rare apology."
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Bear found wearing mountain goat's tracking collar

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "A radio signal led Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist Kevin White to a black bear wearing a GPS tracking collar north of Juneau. That was fine, except that White placed the collar on a Rocky Mountain goat in 2006. 'Bears are really curious about foreign objects in their environment,' said researcher LaVern Beier. Biologists are still trying to figure out if the bear is 'wearing' or swallowed the collar. More at http://www.juneauempire.com/stories/022408/out_250438097.shtml"
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Sharper Image Files Chapter 11

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "Bling seller The Sharper Image http://www.sharperimage.com/ has filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy http://news.digitaltrends.com/news/story/15821/sharper_image_files_for_bankruptcy. Apparently blown away by the Ionic Breeze, reports on the glitzy retailer's demise cite lawsuits over the efficacy of the company's much-ballyhooed air purifiers as the cause of its woes. The company sold three million of the units, but was sued over claims it misled consumers about the efficacy of the purifiers. Sharper Image claimed the units removed dust, pollen, and other particles from room air; the company consistently denied the allegations, but offered $19 million in merchandize credits to customers who purchased the units, and agreed to scale back its claims.""
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Tracing Stolen Computer via AIM

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor writes "A few weeks ago, burglars broke into our offices and stole several computers. Recently, the AIM screen name of one of our employees began logging onto the AIM server, even though that employee was not logged on via their new computer. It turned out that the employee had not deactivated their AIM screen name, and the IM program on the stolen computer is set to load at startup. So, the thieves (or the person to whom they sold or gave the computer) are connected to the net via the stolen machine. Obviously, we hope to identify the IP address through which the stolen computer is connected so that law enforcement can perhaps recover our computers. The problem is that AOL insists it does not and cannot log connections to its AIM servers. I think that is bull cookies and AOL simply does not want to be bothered. I have attempted to lure the user of the stolen computer into a direct IM connection (which bypasses the AIM server and thus I could identify the IP address of the connection), but have so far not succeeded. I hoped Slashdotters might be able to confirm or refute AOL's contention that it cannot log connections to AIM servers, or suggest an alternative means whereby to identify the IP address of the stolen machine. What say you, Slashdotters?"
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Outsourcing Fast Food Orders

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "When you roll up to the drive-through squawk box at your favorite fast-food outlet, the person taking your order might be several hundred miles away rather than inside the restaurant. I was astonished to learn this recently while watching a Modern Marvels episode, "Fast Food Tech," on The History Channel http://www.history.com/shows.do?episodeId=254811&action=detail. Several chains began outsourcing order-taking to call centers a couple of years ago http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/11/technology/11fast.html http://www.foodfacts.info/blog/2006/11/outsourcing-drive-thru-window.html — not to cut costs, but to improve service. Another interesting fact from the TV episode is that fast food became "fast" thanks to technological developments in kitchen equipment, including computer-controlled deep fryers and metered dispensing of menu item components, which made it possible to produce the finished food product on an assembly line."
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China: Going For The Gold In Press Tyranny

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "Editor & Publisher Online has an interesting article http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/columns/newspaperbeat_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003642645 about 'freedom of the press' in China leading up to the 2008 Summer Olympic Games. FTA: Back in 2001, when China was awarded the right to stage next year's Summer Games, Wang Wei, executive vice president of the Beijing Organizing Committee for the Olympic Games, assured foreign journalists that they would have complete freedom to do their work. How's that working out, six years later? Ask Dan Griffiths, a correspondent with the BBC World Service. A couple of weeks ago, he took a ride to a village about three hours south of Beijing to check out reports of protests against the local authorities. He was there for just a few minute before the police swooped in."
Link to Original Source
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Highlights from FTC Spam Summit 2007

TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 7 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "The blog space at epsilon.com http://www.epsilon.com/blog/2007/07/top_takeaways_ from_ftc_spam_su_1.html has an interesting summary of the highlights from the FTC "Spam Summit 2007" recently held in Washington, D.C. Among the more interesting observations: (1) The government and big ISPs think CAN-SPAM is an effective legal tool. (2) The problem isn't marketers, it's spammers... (3) ISPs will continue to bestow more inbox control on end users. One of the most poignant statements was from Miles Libbey of Yahoo, who said: "Operationally, we define spam as whatever consumers don't want in their inbox.""
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TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 7 years ago

TFGeditor writes "Thanks to /. readers' advice from a previous Ask Slashdot ahref=http://ask.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=06/09 /28/2153212rel=url2html-31469http://ask.slashdot.o rg/article.pl?sid=06/09/28/2153212> , I now have a PC system optimally configured to produce professional on-air radio programs. Now I have a new problem. My radio co-host and I are in different cities located a few hundred miles apart. In order to give the show a real-time (i.e. "live") sound, we need to somehow connect him and me over the net so that we can produce a show complete with co-host banter, real-time interaction, etc. as if we were both in the same studio. How can we do this? Will Skype or other VOIP applications do this without the result sounding "tinny" (like a phone connection), or are there other apps that will do a better job? Need your advice/help."
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TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 7 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "On a web page called "jay's site.com" http://www.netscape.com/viewstory/2007/03/09/is-yo ur-child-a-computer-hacker/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.j ayssite.com%2Fstuff%2Fchildhacker%2Fchildhacker.ht ml&frame=true there is a hilarious article supposedly written by a parent who discovered his son was a "computer hacker." What makes it so funny (besides all the absurdities it contains) is that it is not supposed to be funny — at least I do not *think* it is supposed to be funny. Among the top ten signs your child might be a hacker is use of the "illegal hacker operation system, Lunix." From the article: "BSD, Lunix, Debian and Mandrake are all versions of an illegal hacker operation system, invented by a Soviet computer hacker named Linyos Torovoltos, before the Russians lost the Cold War. It is based on a program called "xenix", which was written by Microsoft for the US government. These programs are used by hackers to break into other people's computer systems to steal credit card numbers. They may also be used to break into people's stereos to steal their music, using the "mp3" program. Lunix is extremely dangerous software, and cannot be removed without destroying part of your hard disk surface." All I can say is, "Wow.""
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TFGeditor TFGeditor writes  |  more than 7 years ago

TFGeditor (737839) writes "The company I work for is launching a pre-recorded radio program. I will be working with other staff (all in remote locations) to create the sound clips and then cobbling the show together (mixing). I will also interface with the co-host at a remote studio over the net via uber-broadband connection, producing our portion of the show as if we were in the same studio interacting with each other. What is the best sound card for the money (PC/XP) for this application?"

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