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Comments

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Apple Refusing Any BitTorrent Related Apps?

TechnicolourSquirrel Re:If you don't like it.... (296 comments)

Equivalency between any of those things is not required for that post to be dead accurate about the logical flaw in the typical defence for censorship, capitalist-style. Ever heard of reductio ad absurdum? "But what *I* choose to apply my logic to is *not* absurd!" -- that is not a valid defence.

more than 5 years ago
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Single Drive Wipe Protects Data

TechnicolourSquirrel Did somebody outlaw making assumptions? (625 comments)

There is *no* way to recover the data on a modern drive after a single wipe. It is actually impossible. It cannot be done.

The reason is simple - although you may be able to detect a tiny tiny bit of data from the previous recording, you've no idea how strongly overwritten it is. Now, with old drives which used simple on/off pulses to write data to the disk, it would be possible to see if the bit you're looking at is a little higher or lower than it should be, and infer the previous value from that. Modern drives use a system similar to QAM - quadrature amplitude modulation - to pack more bits of data into each transition on the disk. Since the signal is essentially analogue, you'd need to know how badly degraded the print-through was. You can't do this, so you can't recover data after it's been overwritten even once.

Well, you could just assume it's all been overwritten exactly once. I imagine that this would allow you to reconstruct a fair amount of data -- particularly if people take the advice in TFA seriously.

more than 5 years ago
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Hippies Say WiFi Network Is Harming Their Chakras

TechnicolourSquirrel Re:Very sensitive people? (432 comments)

Their problems don't disappear at all in a double-blind test. They just fail to correlate with the actual presence of the signal. Often their 'problems' become exacerbated and they send themselves mentally into a crisis because of their belief that they are being subjected to RF, even though it happens to be off in that part of the test. These trials usually end up with a significant number of people dropping off due to such 'crises'. Mind you, the symptoms of the 'sensitives' are actually real and can be life-threatening, so they should absolutely be taken very seriously and they never 'disappear'. They just aren't caused by what they are convinced they are caused by.

more than 5 years ago
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How the City Hurts Your Brain

TechnicolourSquirrel Yes! Everyone knows that evolution... (439 comments)

...would have predisposed the human mind to perform poorly in an environment of multiple potentially dangerous stimuli which demand a minimum level of awareness... ...oh wait. I've just noticed that I'm talking complete nonsense. Never mind.

more than 5 years ago
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The RIAA's Rocky Road Ahead

TechnicolourSquirrel Welcome to the minority! (542 comments)

Welcome to the post of the minority opinionator, where your opinion matters. Unless it agrees with that of the majority. Then you are obviously being coopted and brainwashed. Only those who hold minority opinions can possibly have logic on their side. No, this isn't sore-loser whining: it's principle! Anyone who agrees with the majority obviously has no principles, since the only explanation for this common opinioin is that the holders of it are afraid of the majority. I am unafraid therefore I am right. Your Mileage Must Vary.

more than 5 years ago
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Psystar Claims Apple Forgot To Copyright Mac OS

TechnicolourSquirrel Re:Revisionist Memory (648 comments)

Back then a computer was $4000

Um ... no. Not unless you're comparing high end 10 years ago to low end today. A starter name-brand desktop system complete with monitor and keyboard in the mid-'90s would generally hover just below $2000 and sometimes break above it: this was true for both Mac and PC. Nowadays they tend to hover just above $1000, sometimes breaking into the $1500 range. A significant change, but not nearly as radical as you suggest. The last time I can remember hearing about typical 'average' (non-pro) Mac users spending $4000 on their systems was in 1984. From there until the 1990 it was more like $3000 as an upper range. After 1990 (but still well before the clone era) prices precipitously dropped to around to $2000 level for starter systems. And after 2000 they have been dipping toward that magic $1000 mark and sometimes with the odd product even hitting it, like with the eMac and the very lowest end iMacs. (The Mac mini crossed it like many bargain basement PC vendors, but that also depends on what you do for a monitor and a keyboard.) Things changed much more before the Mac cloning era than they have since.

more than 5 years ago
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Does Obama Have a Problem At NASA?

TechnicolourSquirrel You're such a n00b (479 comments)

The USA defeated the communist Soviet Union by outspending them in the specific industry of aerospace technology.

Wait, what? Did I miss a piece of history somewhere along the way where the Soviet Union was "beaten", rather than fizzled out?

What you missed was the widespread mainstream American adoption of the section of Republican talking points in which they yelled 'pwned!' after the Soviet Union tripped over itself.

more than 5 years ago
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iPhone App Pricing Limits Developers

TechnicolourSquirrel Oh frabjous day! (437 comments)

We should all be rejoicing at the prospect that Apple's ridiculously walled garden of a smartphone app distribution model might crumble into ringtones and other nonsense, since the more it is taken seriously the more our future handheld freedoms are in danger through copycatting and industry-wide adoption (think it won't happen? cf. PlaysForSure + iPod = Zune). Sadly, however, TFA'S argument is bogus, since on desktop systems, people publish extremely complex apps for free, every day. Oh well. Guess it's back to hold out all of our wrists for velvet handcuffs...

more than 5 years ago
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Apple Says Macs Are Safe, No Antivirus Needed

TechnicolourSquirrel Macs have a HUGE architectural security advantage (449 comments)

That advantage is very simple. People with pirated copies of Windows cannot get security updates, due to DRM. People with pirated copies of OS X get all the updates, no questions asked. Viruses do not discriminate and are more likely to fluorish (and therefore threaten *your* machine) in an environment with a certain number of unprotected machines. All of the pirate copies of Windows out there become that vector, by Microsoft's design. Therefore, the installed Mac OS X userbase is at a massive architectural advantage for security compared to the Windows userbase, simply because Microsoft places the almighty dollar above all other considerations.

more than 5 years ago
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Oblong's g-speak Brings "Minority Report" Interface To Life

TechnicolourSquirrel It's about the 'real-world pixels'... (221 comments)

Ignore the dorky gestures and focus on the 'real-world pixels' -- pixels that are aware of not only their coordinates on a digital surface, but also their coordinates in the room at large. This is the big leap forward here, not all the arm-waving. Try to see the whole, bud.

more than 5 years ago
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Oblong's g-speak Brings "Minority Report" Interface To Life

TechnicolourSquirrel You have it exactly backwards (221 comments)

You should have RTFA. The interface in Minority Report is based on Oblong's G-speak, not vice versa. In fact, G-speak has been in development for more than a decade, and the creator of G-speak was the science advisor on the film. so if anybody is "unimaginative" it's the makers of the film, not the makers of this interface.

more than 5 years ago
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Apple's New MacBooks Have Built-In Copy Protection

TechnicolourSquirrel Re:To Steve (821 comments)

So I am making a prediction,and the prediction is this: That 5 years from now any mention of "cloud computing" will be strictly in a past tense. As will most likely Youtube,Netfix on demand,etc.

Cloud computing, yes, you're right. Simply put, it's nonsense, it's a technologically inferior way to store your data, and it truly benefits nobody except those who are slavering at the prospect of putting unassailable walls around your data. However, Youtube, Netflix, and other on-demand-video -- definitely no, those services will stay as is, but will not advance anywhere close to what people think in five years.

more than 5 years ago
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Trading the Markets With FOSS Software?

TechnicolourSquirrel Tech people interested in finance = backwards (417 comments)

I don't know *any* techies who are interested in the 'world of finance'. In fact, as a group, they tend to hate it with a passion exceeded only by that of artists. But I hear there are a hell of a lot of *financiers* with an interest in the world of *tech*. The confusion is understandable. Update worldview accordingly.

more than 5 years ago
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Why Is the Internet So Infuriatingly Slow?

TechnicolourSquirrel Re:August 15th 1971 (812 comments)

When your money devalues exponentially, it makes absolutely no sense to spend it on "quality", it makes far more sense to simply get rid of it as fast as you can on any old crap.

So ... it makes sense to you to specifically purchase crap with your rapidly devaluing currency? Because that makes no sense to me, and even from a business point of view, if currency is devaluing, then it makes more sense to me to invest in infrastructure now, before it devalues any further.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Photonovelists Start Running Into Each Other

TechnicolourSquirrel TechnicolourSquirrel writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TechnicolourSquirrel (1092811) writes "In a kind of fan convention replay of Man Bites Dog, one camera-wielding photo comic creator encounters another at Fan Expo 2008 in Toronto, resulting in some amusingly self-reflexive photoblogging that may demonstrate the value of the network effect in the field of photonovels. The blogger also has this to say about convention culture: "Far more this year than last year, the gamers were segregated from the rest of the convention-goers. Nonlinear geeks are not like linear geeks. The clustering vibe is as different as between a clan of badgers and a herd of buffalo. It shouldn't really be necessary to separate them — that takes care of itself. I would have preferred it if the organisers had used their floor plan to force a little more mixing".

[Note for Eds: This is a corrected version of the story I submitted earlier, in which I believe I mistakenly wrote 'Man Bites Bog' where I intended to write 'Man Bites Dog'. This is the corrected copy — you may post it or use it as a guide to correct the original timestamped version, or just reject both as you wish. Apologise for doing it this way — it was the only way I knew to be sure the same people would see it.]"
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Photonovelists Start Running Into Each Other

TechnicolourSquirrel TechnicolourSquirrel writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TechnicolourSquirrel (1092811) writes "In a kind of fan convention replay of Man Bites Bog, one camera-wielding photo comic creator encounters another at Fan Expo 2008 in Toronto, resulting in some amusingly self-reflexive photoblogging that gives us a glimpse of the network effects we will probably see when basically everybody is doing a photonovel. The blogger also has this to say about convention culture: 'Far more this year than last year, the gamers were segregated from the rest of the convention-goers. Nonlinear geeks are not like linear geeks. The clustering vibe is as different as between a clan of badgers and a herd of buffalo. It shouldn't really be necessary to separate them — that takes care of itself. I would have preferred it if the organisers had used their floor plan to force a little more mixing.'"
Link to Original Source
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TechnicolourSquirrel TechnicolourSquirrel writes  |  more than 7 years ago

TechnicolourSquirrel (1092811) writes "Forbes.com informs us that Media Rights Technologies is suing Microsoft, Apple, Adobe, and Real Networks for not using its DRM technology and therefore 'failing to include measures to control access to copyrighted material,' alleging that their refusal to use MRT's X1 Recording Control technology constitutes a 'circumvention' of a copyright protection system, which is of course illegal under the Digital Millenium Copryight Act. I would say more, but without controlling access to this paragraph with MRT's products, I fear I have already risked too much..."

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