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Comments

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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

TemporalBeing Re:My opinion on the matter. (810 comments)

Why? A restart of the service may very well clear out any logs relevant to the crash.

You wrote some pretty poor daemons. Since you can't be bothered to use the syslog facility, my suggestion is that you start opening files without calling truncate on them after.

You misunderstand. Syslog is used. The problem is that syslog only keeps so much data. The logs can very quickly cycle through the limited data that syslog holds. I've had systems where multiple daemons work together and an issue that led to a crash would very quickly get cleared out of the logs even with 600MB of log data being held (6x100MB files in rotation, managed by syslog) if the software was simply restarted.

about a week ago
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Scientists Baffled By Unknown Source of Ozone-Depleting Chemical

TemporalBeing Re:Easy, India or China (303 comments)

Nonsense. The Affordable care act for example is intended to do the opposite. Its a flawed semi-done piece of legislation, but that's because the Republicans have done nothing but obstruct as usual.

Publically intended, yes. Truely intended? I doubt it. It's a highly flawed piece of legislation that should never have been passed.

about a week ago
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Scientists Baffled By Unknown Source of Ozone-Depleting Chemical

TemporalBeing Re:Easy, India or China (303 comments)

Never said they blamed the Republicans for it. Just that they are doing the same thing themselves.

about a week ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

TemporalBeing Re:The init system (810 comments)

What's broken is this. The initt system assumes:

1) All the subsystems boot quickly 2) None of them need to communicate back and forth about status in complex ways 3) The list isn't too long

There exists lots of users for which one or more of those 3 assumptions are false. If you don't assume those 3 then you would design boot differently.

Take a look at things like OpenRC. It manages a lot of that kind of stuff really really well. I'd much rather have it than systemd.

about a week ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

TemporalBeing Re:My opinion on the matter. (810 comments)

FYI - I've written many daemons. In cases like this, a crash needs to stay down until the admin gets to it.
Why? A restart of the service may very well clear out any logs relevant to the crash.
This is especially true once the service starts relying on things like D-Bus where settings are live and can themselves be the source of the crash, but are not discovered until run-time and there's lots of network/bus talk to get to it.

So no, auto-restart is in 99% of cases NOT a feature.

about a week ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

TemporalBeing Re:My opinion on the matter. (810 comments)

You got a bunch of "upstarts" who don't know, or don't care, about Linux's roots and want to turn it into something it just never was meant to be

When I was a junior network engineer, I sometimes had to work on (what we now consider ancient) technology such as ATM, Frame Relay and ISDN. I even had my share of IPX/SPX. Back in those days, the experienced network engineers with 20+ years of experience despised Ethernet while complaining about those junior folks who knew nothing about the established technologies. As it turned out, all of them are out of a job now. Bottom line is, when it comes to technology progress, roots are pretty much irrelevant. I don't care if something has been done like this for 1000 years. If we can find a better way to do it, let's do it. The question should be whether or not systemd is progress, or an unnecessary burden. History is irrelevant in this case.

From every experience I've had with systemd, I'd say that it is NOT progress. I don't want every little thing integrated in the manner systemd does.

And frankly, OpenRC is a lot better.

about a week ago
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Put A Red Cross PSA In Front Of the ISIS Beheading Video

TemporalBeing If you want a PSA... (300 comments)

Personally, I elect not to watch it so as not to encourage more of it; and I do welcome YouTube et al removing the video, etc on the same grounds.

Now, if you want to make an argument for putting a PSA in front of the video, then you don't do it with a charity like the Red Cross. You do with several PSAs - one for the UN, and one for the viewer's country's Military enrollment, and across the world one for enrollment in the US Armed Forces. And you make sure all the PSAs are at least equal in length to the video with a big message of "hey, this is what the world will come to if you don't defend your freedoms".

This avoids the whole "profit" motive, etc that you would have with a charity as well. (And make no mistake, the Red Cross is a charity; a non-profit NGO.)

American of me? Yes. But in this kind of war, that kind of message will be the only way to really fight back - make it against their interest to post the videos to start with but providing more advertising for their enemy than for them, which is what the video is really about (a call to arms for the extremous).

But, as I said - personally I would just take it all down. But if you're going to do it, do it right.

about a week ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

TemporalBeing Re:Correction: (338 comments)

I have and they remain not as bad as snookering the country into a war based on fabricated evidence. Even some of the R's supporters have come to realize that.

If you're talking about Iraq (which I assume you are), then we were already in an approved war - one that started in the 1990's. Very similar to how we are still technically at war with North Korea (since the 1950's) just have a cease-fire in play. Any how...regarding Iraq - all the intelligence suggested there were WMDs from numerous sources and both parties believed it, not just the Republicans. It wasn't helped at all by Sadam's secrecy and lack of letting the UN see what was going on, which only furthered people believing he actually had WMDs and was hiding them. It wasn't until they were actually able to see things that they could tell the intelligence was bad. No falsication happened; just the inability of intelligence to get at the truth due to the circumstances - like things both US and Russia did during the Cold War to throw the other off, only in Sadam's case it probably had to do more with regional politics than anything else.

Hindsight, as they say, is always 20/20. And as I noted, both sides of the aisle agreed on the intelligence and what it meant.

about two weeks ago
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Netflix CEO On Net Neutrality: Large ISPs Are the Problem

TemporalBeing Re:Big Data (181 comments)

Except that if Comcast gets caught doing that, they'll be slapped as common carriers before they can take their next breath. Now, that doesn't mean you're wrong. It just means there is incentive to not play too dirty (purposeful degradation)

Except they have been kind-of caught doing just that; not blatantly. All they have to do is slow down any connection that goes outside of their network - they've already been caught throttling connections.

about two weeks ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

TemporalBeing Re:Correction: (338 comments)

I'm not all that fond of either one, but sitting out here in 3rd party territory, the Ds seem to be less packed with idiots and crooks.

Have you looked at Medicare, Medicaide, Welfare, or ObamaCare? Full of crooks. All programs by the Dems.

about two weeks ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

TemporalBeing Re: yeah (338 comments)

I agree municipalities should, in general, have the right to install utilities, broadband included. But I also like the idea of state control more than federal control, as it typically promotes more models that can be compared. In the case of municipal broadband, there are a range of successes and failures, including some big money losers. If State money is being used, then the States need to be able to determine the rules. If you don't want State level control, then let the local municipalities & citizens pay for the broadband utility build if they want, but they should also pay the debt if they fail and not ask for a State or Federal bail out.

US Constitution puts things primarily in local control; State is there to moderate the localities, and Federal is there to moderate the states. But it is first and foremost about the people being able to have control.

That said, there's been a lot of "take" at both the Federal and State levels that leave the localities with little control much of the time. All of that needs to change.

about two weeks ago
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FCC Warned Not To Take Actions a Republican-Led FCC Would Dislike

TemporalBeing Re: yeah (338 comments)

Free marketism. It's a fundamentalist religion.

He's not advocating for a free market. A free market would allow municipal broadband.

about two weeks ago
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Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

TemporalBeing Re:The first ever business course (179 comments)

that will include a chapter on how to select the most throwable chair.

It's be great if they had a day or two on the Elop Effect...

about two weeks ago
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Scientists Baffled By Unknown Source of Ozone-Depleting Chemical

TemporalBeing Or may be... (303 comments)

...it's not anything man made. May be it's just a natural, environmental condition that no matter what we do will never really go away.

Seriously, who says that someone has to be behind it? A scientist? They've been trying that meme for years; and probably will continue that meme for years to come. It may just be that it's not human related in any manner.

But then, OMG, humans may not be at fault for AGW or Ozone Depletion...environmentalists can't have that.

Now, I'm not saying that we should not be good stewards and clean up after ourselves; make sure that industry waste is not properly disposed of, etc. We should. We should do our best to (as the Boy Scouts say) leave the area at least as clean as we found it.

about two weeks ago
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Scientists Baffled By Unknown Source of Ozone-Depleting Chemical

TemporalBeing Re:Easy, India or China (303 comments)

Nothing he said implies they're all exactly the same. As a group they do have the motivation he mentions. The wealth gap is widening, and everything the Republicans do is designed to make it so. They are evil. Every single one.

What's funny is that everything the Democrats do does the same thing. They are evil. Every single one.

about two weeks ago
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Netflix CEO On Net Neutrality: Large ISPs Are the Problem

TemporalBeing Re:Big Data (181 comments)

Then I suggest they start routing their Comcast bound traffic out one of those other providers. I'd be happy to help them do it, but I have a sneaking suspicion technical capability isn't the hold-up. I certainly have had to do it many times for our content provider customers... Then again, we have 6 different upstreams, and we only use Cogent for the people who really, really don't care how bad their connectivity is. The pricing is good enough to leave the circuit their idle, not hitting commit, and not care.

I don't know who they have with Comcast, but I wouldn't be surprised if they had multiple transit connections from multiple transit providers to Comcast already.

I also wouldn't be surprised to see Comcast and Verizon purposefully degrading Netflix in order to promote their own products (f.e Comcast's Xfinity) instead.

about two weeks ago
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Netflix CEO On Net Neutrality: Large ISPs Are the Problem

TemporalBeing Re:Big Data (181 comments)

An interesting gun... Here in People-Who-Are-Actually-Professional-Network-EngineersVille, we'd simply accept that our current cheapest-available-transit-provider has shitty connectivity (really? Cogent? really really? Well done, Netflix. Not pinching any pennies, at all) and get a provider that didn't offer bargain bin connectivity and shitty routes to just about everyone. But hey. It's entirely the receiving network's fault.

FTR, NetFlix uses a number of different transit providers, not just Cogent.

about two weeks ago
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NVIDIAs 64-bit Tegra K1: The Ghost of Transmeta Rides Again, Out of Order

TemporalBeing Re:Is it better? (125 comments)

Errm, it's a dual-core chip, and there's no third core for running the optimizations. They run on the same CPU cores that everything else does.

It's a dual core chip with one core dedicated to doing the optimizations and the other for running the code.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Linux-based GPS Units?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 3 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "I'm looking to a GPS unit, in-car windshield mount, for my wife. I know there are some units on the market already that run Linux, and I'd like to lend them my supports over their non-Linux brethren. However, I am quite new to looking at them and looking over TomTom's and Garmin's website does not provide any info on what OS they run. Android or another custom Linux is okay; and I need maps for the U.S.A. So, what do you recommend?"
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The evils of CVSNT

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 3 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "CVSNT was originally a port of CVS to Windows, as well as some enhancements for the Windows environment. It is the backbone of projects like TortoiseCVS. This last spring, officially announced in late June, the current maintainers of CVSNT decided make the project a for-pay only as they migrate from being just CVS to their EVS system, which purports to integrate Subversion and other systems as well. In the process of doing so they have (i) closed down all mailing lists, even those they advertise on their website, (ii) no longer provide binaries except through back-end channels to open source projects like TortoiseCVS for distribution so those projects can continue, (iii) cut-off access to their source repositories, and (iv) done this all by saying they were advised to do so by the FSF, pointing only to a few web pages on the FSF's site. While the FSF does endorse that the GPL, LGPL, and open source projects can charge for the project, I find it highly suspicious that the FSF would endorse such a move by an open source project — one that essentially makes the project a proprietary project. What makes matters worse is that there is no tool available to move from CVSNT to a standard CVS or to any other revision control system as there are numerous "enhancements" to the RCS data backend that are specific to CVSNT which tools like cvs2svn don't understand, and without access to the source won't be able to understand. Additionally, since CVSNT became a more active project than the CVS project it was derived from it has essentially become the de facto CVS version used, stranding many in CVS and subject to the whims of March-Hare. Hopefully by brining this to the attention of Slashdot, the situation can be rectified."
Link to Original Source
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OpenMoko Freerunner dead?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 4 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "I've been looking to get an OpenMoko FreeRunner for a few months now; however, I wanted to get the A7 model as it has the Buzz Fix already applied. Sadly, The A7 model isn't available from OpenMoko with the 850MHZ radio. I recently e-mailed OpenMoko through their contact e-mail/support about this, asking when the 850MHZ will be available, only to get the following response:

There will not have A7 for GSM850 because we had stopped the phone development. Now we are focusing on our new product called WikiReader.

This after the last September's announcement of No More OpenMoko Phone and Openmoko Phone Not Dead After All. Looks like they are really just trying to clear the stock.

Submitter's note: Original Source is an e-mail I have. Please be kind with the original source I quote — it's the best I could do with slashdot's story submission form."

Link to Original Source

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Scientists report others fake data...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "Scientists, at least according to the Times of London, are doing science a great injustice as One in Seven Scientists Say Colleagues Fake Data, stating:

Around 46 percent say that they have observed fellow scientists engage in "questionable practices", such as presenting data selectively or changing the conclusions of a study in response to pressure from a funding source.

And people wonder why the science is so fought nowadays. It's interesting that only 2 percent reported having engaged in such practices though...but then, is the study author trying to justify their study? Or are they presenting the facts?"

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Science and Religion...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "In a recent essay published by The New Republic Jerry A. Coyne provides some insight into funding of science and the public groups that provide it — even those professing to be of "Christian" leaning. Regis Nicoll writes a summary for Breakpoint (an on-line and radio broadcast originally lead by Charles Colson in which we find:

Contrary to modern criticism, the scientist who approaches the world as a product of intelligence, rather than of matter and motion, is less likely to stop short of discovery. Instead of dismissing a feature that, at first glance, appears inert, unnecessary or just plain mystifying, he is more inclined to push the envelope of investigation to unravel its function and purpose.

Comments by Breakpoint readers can be found here. (Please be kind if posting to comments there; they are moderated and they don't get the volume normally does.)"

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LVM Disk Mirroring - to USB or not to USB

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing writes "I recently had a hard drive fail on me, and now working my way through the recovery process. Fortunately I didn't lose much data as it seems the hard drive mostly had stuff I didn't care too much about on it...things easily recoverable by re-install. Thankfully, it was a Linux system using LVM2.

As I work through this process I am also thinking about how to keep from losing data in the future, and have decided to setup a basic mirror RAID on the system, which is relatively new — e.g. circa 2005 — and supports USB2.0 without a problem. I am also thinking of doing the same on my home server — circa 1997/1998 — that only has USB1.1, and is in a fully operational state — though it doesn't have LVM installed yet.

So I looked in the adds this week, and noticed a Western Digital MyBook Essential 500GB drive on sale this week for $89, which leads me to my question for SlashDot:

I know USB is slower than internal drives for performance. But is it slow enough that it would not be good to use for mirroring the internal drives as part of a software drive mirror implemented via LVM2? Or should I try to go with internal hard drives for the task?

My goal is to try to keep the budget down, and right now get a mirror in place so that next time a hard disk failure won't even stand a question on whether data is lost — I just pop in a new disk to mirror to."
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CowboyNeal for President!

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TemporalBeing writes "Given the poor choice of candidates for the President of the USA this election season, we here at Slashdot should organize our own campaign and put forth one of our own as a Candidate. I propose CowboyNeal for President. (Think we can get him to run?)

Let's have some fun and really enjoy the season."
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Visualizing the Body...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "IEEE provides a pretty nice article on how IBM is playing with technology like that of Google's GoogleEarth, only for medical, electronic health records instead. From the article:

"The 3-D coordinates in the model are mapped to anatomical concepts, which serve as an index onto the electronic health record. This means that you can retrieve the information by just clicking on the relevant anatomical part. It's both 3-D navigation and a 3-D indexed map," explains Elisseeff..."You can think of it as being like Google Earth for the body," is how Elisseeff frames the mapper engine. "We see this as a way to manage the increasing complexity that will come in using computers in medicine.""
"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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Microsoft's Real Plan?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 7 years ago What's Microsoft's real plan? With the advent of .Net, the Microsoft/Novell deal, the splitting of Microsoft into three major groups internally, and the impossibility of Windows being developed the same way that Vista was for the the generation of Windows it becomes quite possible that Windows as we know it - with an NT Kernel and all - is no longer the future of Windows. Just how might Microsoft surive? Check out my full blog describing Microsoft's Real Plan.

From the blog:

It has been my speculation that .Net was the start of Microsoft's plan for how they will survive in a post Windows world.

...

Imagine (for a moment) Microsoft releasing a new version of Windows - Windows NG (for Next Generation) - that does not provide any backwards compatibility whatsoever. If Microsoft did this, they would need to be able to quickly push a lot of people to support their new system; or they could ride on the shoulders of giants - existing OS's that are already out there that have a lot of software

...

then how could Microsoft use an existing OS? What would there be for them to use? Well, there is always the BSD's, but then Microsoft would have to fork and support their own - kind of like Apple did; which could be costly. Or, Microsoft could chose a Linux Distribution (Novell's SuSE?) and make it its primary back end; add on the extra tools to move their infrastructure over (Vista's User Mode Sound and Video drivers, and .Net) and a user interface to make it look like Windows

A possibility? Sure. Likely? Only time will tell.

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Programming vs. Software Engineering & Why Software Is Hard

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 7 years ago I noticed the Slashdot Article on Why Software Is Hard and wrote a response in my Blog. Should be a good read for any techy. The blog entrie primary talks about Software Engineering vs. Programming. Needless to say, these go hand-in-hand with why software is hard. To quote from the Blog:

The key difference, however, is that the Software Engineer realizes that the "programming process" is just the implementation phase of creating software; and that there is a lot more to be done before the implementation phase can even begin. Comparitively, the programmer wants to just jump in and start writing code as soon as they have been handed a task, skipping the rest of the process, and possibly even ignoring any part of that process if anything from it was handed to him/her.

And FYI - the blog is more than just a link to the Slashdot article, and its related article. It also includes a link to few postings on OS News and its sister article, as well as some responses to a couple of the comments to that article. Needless to say, Slashdot (from what I could see) was a lot more forgiving of the original article.

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