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Comments

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Lots Of People Really Want Slideout-Keyboard Phones: Where Are They?

TemporalBeing Blame Large Corporate Carriers... (516 comments)

Seriously, back in 2004 I was trying to get a phone WITHOUT a camera because I couldn't have a camera at work. Despite being in an area (Washing D.C Metro Area) where this is a requirement for the better part of the majority of the population it was extremely difficult. I never upgraded the phone as a result.

I stopped in several stores and asked about it and was politely informed that the stores do not get to decide what phones they carry. Their corporate parents do - the execs at AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, etc; which means they make it based on what profit margins and policies they want to set forth. So if they want everyone to have a camera, then so be it.

Now adays those same big carriers are trying to push everyone towards the profit centers around the smart phones. AT&T policy is that if you have a keyboard you need an SMS/TXT plan; but if you have a touch screen then you need a (far more costly) data plan.

yesterday
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No RIF'd Employees Need Apply For Microsoft External Staff Jobs For 6 Months

TemporalBeing Re: Not about leaks (282 comments)

what would you do if you were a disabled and mentally retarded orphan?

That is one of the few cases where I agree that programs like Social Security are required. Those programs shouldn't be available to the general populus, only those that really need them - the exceptions instead of the rule. This would also make such programs more easily fundable and solvent.

The only thing we're arguing about here, then, is what qualifies as "disabled" or "retarded."

We need to come up with a national approach to retirement/etc benefits that works for everybody - not just those who are both good at earning money AND good at investing it.

National programs that are extended to the general populus will never be sustainable and will result in either insolvency or the destruction of the nation and/or currency.

I would only extend benefits to those who are incapable of work, or to supplement those who cannot earn a decent basic income. Today that would be a fairly insignificant portion of the GDP.

Agreed on the first two; disagree on the last. So no, a very small minority (probably well under 10%) would qualify. It's just not sustainable to do otherwise.

Define "decent basic income". You'll have all ranges from "at poverty level" to "I want a million dollars per year" depending on who you talk to. So it's just a non-starter. That's not to say that some programs (e.g Food Stamps) shouldn't compensate for "poverty level and below", but the kind of program we're discussing above can't sustain anything other than "those that are completely and provably incapable of work" - and "incapable" does not mean "too lazy" but being legally disabled (even temporarily).

As much as I might like to make it work on an honor system, people are generally too corrupt to do so; therefore it (sadly) has to be testable with legal consequences for fraud.

With steady advances in technology and increased specialization in the workforce we just keep raising the bar for the kinds of skills and talents somebody needs to have to earn their own way. Eventually, not even you would have been able to hold down a job.

False. Advanced in Technology does not necessitate increased specialization. The only thing that really drives the "raising the bar" issue here is inflation and the long held beliefs that you have to have inflation - you can't keep the currency stable or have deflation.

The US has barely any inflation at all, and for anybody who works for a living a little inflation isn't a big deal.

The inflation over the last 100 years is substantial; especially the inflation in the last 35 years is substantial.

Prices go up, but so do wages. Their retirement funds might have problems, but most people don't have those anyway.

There is nothing that dictates that wages and prices HAVE to go up; only economists. A well balanced economic system would not require inflation.

When I look around me I see tons of specialization as a result of technological advances.

There is that in white collar jobs.

Nobody works as a general laborer these days.

This goes to show how out-of-touch you are. Get your head out of the sand.
There's lots of people doing general labor - look at the construction sites, janitors, cleaning staff. It's REQUIRED that someone fill those positions until we get sufficiently advanced robots to do it for us - which is still a very long way off. Many economists point to these areas as why we need illegal immigrants because they think it is below the level of any citizen to do those jobs; an attitude that does have to change.

yesterday
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Google's Mapping Contest Draws Ire From Indian Government

TemporalBeing Re:So, to summarize... (95 comments)

"You didn't get a permit from us about writing a map, so we will ask you to share the map with us."

So it's known that Airline pilots don't learn to fly in India; they come to the US to learn to fly.
Why? Because there are too many permits required to fly any where it's just not feasible to learn in India.

2 days ago
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Microsoft's Nokia Plans Come Into Better Focus

TemporalBeing Re:It's a funny world (148 comments)

Ironically, Windows 8.1 was also the first time in 20 years they decided to remove the Start menu from the "unchanged" OS...

When Microsoft introduced the start menu they got no end of ridicule about how non-intuitive it was to press start to shut down. Now in 8.1 you have a big power-button right beside your account picture right on the main start screen, and people can't find it... sigh..

Start Screen? Never used it.

If I get a Win8/WinServe2012 system, first thing I do is install ClamShell. Never see the Start Screen after that, but it brings a lot of saneness to the UI; fortunately I don't have to go the Control Panel much as that would still be a foo bar with some settings only in the "Classic" Control Panel and others only in the settings wizard available through the Start Screen. In the end, no matter what I do it's a PITA to use.

2 days ago
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No RIF'd Employees Need Apply For Microsoft External Staff Jobs For 6 Months

TemporalBeing Re: Not about leaks (282 comments)

what would you do if you were a disabled and mentally retarded orphan?

That is one of the few cases where I agree that programs like Social Security are required. Those programs shouldn't be available to the general populus, only those that really need them - the exceptions instead of the rule. This would also make such programs more easily fundable and solvent.

We need to come up with a national approach to retirement/etc benefits that works for everybody - not just those who are both good at earning money AND good at investing it.

National programs that are extended to the general populus will never be sustainable and will result in either insolvency or the destruction of the nation and/or currency.

With steady advances in technology and increased specialization in the workforce we just keep raising the bar for the kinds of skills and talents somebody needs to have to earn their own way. Eventually, not even you would have been able to hold down a job.

False. Advanced in Technology does not necessitate increased specialization. The only thing that really drives the "raising the bar" issue here is inflation and the long held beliefs that you have to have inflation - you can't keep the currency stable or have deflation.

Historically, inflation and deflation act together to maintain a stable currency. Currently we're operating under deluded policies that try to only have one without the other.

2 days ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

TemporalBeing Re:So who pays who? (234 comments)

Rather than thinking about services that are good enough, consider what is currently not possible with limited bandwidth?

Agreed. But P2P applications (e.g BitTorrent, and what remains of Napster/etc) and similar systems to push that. ISPs fought back with limits.

We still don't have perfect realtime video calls. As the need to deal with low bandwidth has allowed advancements in efficient codecs, so to has the processing requirements of endpoints to handle the codec. Allowing for less intensive codecs that use more bandwidth would enable better experience.

Not necessarily as that might propogate pretty quickly. That kind of attitude is also what led to the very extensive bloat in disk utilization among applications, especially those targetting Windows Users.

2 days ago
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"Magic Helmet" For F-35 Ready For Delivery

TemporalBeing Re:Cost (184 comments)

Its main advantage is its ability to integrate sensor information from multiple sources. But this does not warrant building a hugely expensive fighter from scratch. Put the same system on an F18 and F16 and you will have even more capable fighter.

The F-35, AKA Joint Strike Fighter, is more akin to what happened to the Space Shuttle - it's a single aircraft that is suppose to meet the needs of all the different branches. This also why the Space shuttle was such a brick to fly, so costly, and had wings. Hopefully the F-35 won't meet the same end.

4 days ago
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UK Cabinet Office Adopts ODF As Exclusive Standard For Sharable Documents

TemporalBeing Re:Why ODF? (164 comments)

Exactly. The Office file formats are still extremely ubiquitous in the business world, and if you use something like LibreOffice to modify them, the formatting of the documents is almost guaranteed to go crazy, without you possibly not even knowing it, and ultimately losing customers. I'm sorry, but it has just been incredibly practical decision to just install the fucking Microsoft Office. Of course this UK Cabinet's decision is another step towards open standards, so I guess that's good.

Outside of bookmarks in Writer I find OpenOffice/LibreOffice to generate more compliant documents to Microsoft's tools than Microsoft's tools do. They're also typically smaller even when saved in the Microsoft formats.

about a week ago
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No RIF'd Employees Need Apply For Microsoft External Staff Jobs For 6 Months

TemporalBeing Re:Question for someone with Legal? (282 comments)

Oh, hell. I have no interest in being interviewed by Microsoft. If the hiring manager decides to hire his drinking buddy, he needs to interview four other candidates before he can do that. I had five Microsoft recruiters pulled that stunt in 2005, leading me by the nose for a whole month before telling me that all the drinking buddies got hired. I'll hang up on any recruiter who mentions Microsoft to me.

I did a couple rounds with Microsoft a couple years back, namely to see how long it would take them to read the website linked to on my resume that had a big rant on the evils on Microsoft. No intention on working there, but was nice for a comparison; though I think what killed it was my Win2k laptop crashing in the middle of the interview.

That said, that was one of the only series of interactions I had for working at Microsoft that was not through a representative that was on the H1B or sounded like it. Almost every recruiter for them was from India.

about a week ago
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No RIF'd Employees Need Apply For Microsoft External Staff Jobs For 6 Months

TemporalBeing Re:This is just a repeat (282 comments)

This only remotely makes sense if the jobs are interchangeable.

Isn't that what every economist will tell you? Or that they could be retrained for the "new" positions?

about a week ago
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Rupert Murdoch's Quest To Buy Time Warner: Not Done Yet

TemporalBeing Re:This is what extreme capitalism accomplishes (63 comments)

In the end, there is only one big corporation left, and it's hard to distinguish between it and the government. It's not far away now. Feels good, right?

And then they made RoboCop, and we all know how that went...

about a week ago
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No RIF'd Employees Need Apply For Microsoft External Staff Jobs For 6 Months

TemporalBeing Re: Not about leaks (282 comments)

The only reason any of this is problem is that we continue to stupidly tie benefits and retirement to employment. Nobody, especially higher ups, wants to have that conversation in this country.

If being a full time employee simply meant you work more hours than a part time employee and had nothing else associated with it, a good number of people would be better off having two or three part time jobs. Less burn out, more job mobility,and in particular less immediate consequences to getting fired or laid off from a particular job. THAT is the reason big employers are against a national or single payer insurance system and why they demonize the very notion of national retirement benefits even though those things would reduce their costs. They would reduce their power even more, and they just can't have that.

Forget about employers...I wouldn't want a national system. I don't want Social Security, yet I'm forced to participate in that told I'll get money that I'll certainly never see.

No, my retirement portfolio is entirely independent of any employer or the government. And I'd rather keep it that way.

Now what I would change is that I prefer to have the retirement portfolio be entirely subsized by post-tax dollars instead of pre-tax dollars. Why? Because with pre-tax dollars you have to pay the taxes on it when you take the money out, at the future tax rates; while the post-tax dollars are tax-free down the road because you've already paid the tax on them. However, my CPA wife uses both to get us the best tax benefits for any given year.

about a week ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

TemporalBeing Re:Cost of physically implementing SHDSL (234 comments)

What will be telling is if they do the same to the DSL customers in the near future as well.

DSL works over high frequencies in existing copper phone lines. Far more physical bandwidth is typically allocated to the downstream than to the upstream. Balancing this out would reduce download speeds in favor of upload speeds. Are you sure implementing SHDSL wouldn't require rolling trucks and mailing modems?

Except Businesses have had access to higher speed symetric DSL for a lot longer; though that's typically a dedicated line instead of one sharing its bandwidth with a voice line.

about a week ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

TemporalBeing Re:Why then Netflix didn't deal with Level3 direct (390 comments)

Well, NetFlix could also enter into agreements with ever backbone provider, thereby forcing Verizon to either do the same to everyone or start upgrading

This brings to the question of why Netflix has chosen to deal with Verizon instead of with Level3 directly in the first place ?

Even if Netflix didn't know of the existence of Level3 (which I find too ludicrous to be possible) that they had signed up with Verizon, they could have changed the situation right now by dealing directly with Level3, and why wait anymore ?

NetFlix has contracts with lots of folks - Level3 included. These are with respect to pushing content from NetFlix over the backbone into various networks.

NetFlix also promotes having a CDN end-point within an ISP's network to alleviate the need for as much peering; which is what I believe the NetFlix-Verizon deal was about, which Verizon may have (or may not have, we don't really know) charged NetFlix for installing in the datacenters/hubs/central-offices.

However, the fact that NetFlix has done that, which should IMPROVE speed on Verizon's network, and there are still major issues shows that there is something else wrong with Verizon's network. Of course, they might rely on the back bone having sufficient capacity to pull down the information over the CDN too; or it might be that NetFlix installs a direct pipe for the CDNs, we don't know the details. Most likely NetFlix has a contracted pipe with a Level3 interconnect to these, and that is why we're hearing all about it between Level3 and Verizon as Verizon doesn't want to increase their interconnects with Level3 over which those CDN systems are suppose to operate.

But that's just a bit of (educated) guess work as I don't know the details of the Netflix-Verizon arrangement or the network layouts or the NetFlix CDN provisions.

about a week ago
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Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

TemporalBeing Re:Cry Me A River (608 comments)

If the mid-1980's is "the old days"...

No. Try the 1930's through the 1970/1980's. It wasn't until the 1960's that things started to filter down enough that you didn't need as much background in to the computer systems, and some where in the 1970's/early-1980's it became what you knew, namely as the micro-computer (aka PC, Macintosh inclusive) took over.

However, prior that - and even during the 1980's in corporate environments - most every programmer had to know a lot about the Electric Engineering of the computer. Most all of them had EE degrees; some had math degrees; a fewer had the new CS degree (started in the 1970's, but not really popular until the 1990's; I think the first CS program was late 1960's, circa 1968).

about a week ago
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Verizon Boosts FiOS Uploads To Match Downloads

TemporalBeing Re:So who pays who? (234 comments)

biggest problem with upload is you send it over free links with Tier 1 networks, or you pay them to take your traffic. with all the user generated stuff now like Twitch, flickr, video calling and other services where you want a fast upload speed that's a lot of data to be paying for.

with the current L3/Verizon dispute i wonder if they struck a deal where verizon will allow the connections to be upgraded for netflix to work on their network in exchange for L3 taking all their uploaded data for free.

Hmm...that actually makes for an interesting case.

So Level3 basically pointed out the issue with User focused ISP's - that they're asymetric and would never provide the ability for those ISPs to compete in the peering arrangements that back-bone providers have. So now if they go to being symetric, it would allow the users to do more and possibly try to combat what the ISP (e.g Verizon) thinks is a fallacy but they can only prove if they make all their links symetric.

Problem for the ISP is users don't really upload a whole lot any way. So it's not going to change anything for a while. It may get Level3 to drop the "symetric vs asymetric" part of their argument, but it won't change the amount of traffic going from the ISP to back-bone provider.

What will be telling is if they do the same to the DSL customers in the near future as well. Otherwise they are still primarily an asymetric provider as they have more DSL than FiOS customers.

Question is: Will Verizon only do this temporarily as part of an argument with Level3? If so, expect a change in the future when their plan doesn't work out. If not, then hopefully other ISPs will follow in order to "compete".

about a week ago
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Verizon's Accidental Mea Culpa

TemporalBeing Re:Level 3 - start pulling cards (390 comments)

Find locations where you will hurt Verizon customers, and cut the cables. Do so publicly. Precondition repair on upgrades of Verizon's network as you direct. If Verizon doesn't want network neutrality, then punish their customers.

Well, NetFlix could also enter into agreements with ever backbone provider, thereby forcing Verizon to either do the same to everyone or start upgrading.

Just saying, there's multiple ways to skin the pig that is Verizon...and AT&T for that matter.

about two weeks ago
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FBI Concerned About Criminals Using Driverless Cars

TemporalBeing Regulation won't stop them... (435 comments)

Honestly, the fact that they are even available for testing means that some criminals will use them, even if they are outlawed.
As to the specific points raised:

It discussed issues such as letting criminals shoot while the car drives (silly in my opinion, apparently they haven't heard of "partners" or considered requiring such cars have a police controlled "slow down" command),

Slow down command won't mean a thing when the criminals rip out the necessary parts to make it moot or reprogram it to do something - ignore the command, do the opposite, or even blow up the vehicle.

the use of such vehicles as guided bullets (safeties again should stop this), and loading it with explosives and using it as a guided missile. This last concern is the only one that I considered a real issue, but even that is not significantly more dangerous than loading up a regular van full of explosives with a timer, then setting the timer to explode before you leave the vehicle next to a school, etc.

True, aside from it being a "guided" missile - just set a target in the GPS and off it goes....again, the potential is there and criminals won't allow it to stop just because of a "slow down" or "stop" command. They'll figure out a way to override that before using it.

And again, if they really wanted to do it the technology is already out there and nothing is going to stop them from using it if they really wanted to.

about two weeks ago
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Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

TemporalBeing Re:Cry Me A River (608 comments)

Software engineering has a tendency to enshrine ivory tower principles, that - although sound and logical, can end up making your project large, slow bloated and excessively encapsulated. I'm happy that NASA and the DoD both use it, those things need to be rock solid, but it just doesn't make sense for a lot of businesses where being first to market is more important than any code refactoring issues you might have 2 years down the track. Being slow to market might mean you don't even have a business 12 months from now.

Good programmers know when to lay on the engineering and when to pull out the stops and slap something together that does the job "just good enough". That's part of what makes it an art, not a science.

NASA/DoD does a form of Software Engineering based on Engineering principles from other disciplines, namely mechanical and electrical engineering. Much of what they do there doesn't really apply to Software.

What we need to do is define Software Engineering in a manner that is practical for everyone to do it such that no one has any kind of excuse not to do it. To me, it's a matter of doing software in a very discipined manner and has nothing to do with whether you've documented every function at 30 different layers for 10 different stake holders across 5 different organizations.

about two weeks ago
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Scientists Have Developed a Material So Dark That You Can't See It

TemporalBeing Re:galactic hyper-hearse (238 comments)

Pretty sure you're asking a facetious question but for those who don't know (like myself prior to Saturday night, walking through N4 with my brother): Hotblack Desiato is the name of a North London estate agent (Realtor for the merkins), which was adopted by Douglas Adams for the name of the frontman of plutonium rock band Disaster Area.

As is Ford Prefect, which was the name of a Ford car in the UK (1930s-1960s). It's not, as most Americans think, a purposeful mis-spelling of Perfect.

It was written for UK audiences, and poorly Americanized. Half the jokes in there only work in the UK because of cultural issues.

I'd rather it not be "Americanized"...yes, not all jokes transfer, but it's still good as it is.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Linux-based GPS Units?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 3 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "I'm looking to a GPS unit, in-car windshield mount, for my wife. I know there are some units on the market already that run Linux, and I'd like to lend them my supports over their non-Linux brethren. However, I am quite new to looking at them and looking over TomTom's and Garmin's website does not provide any info on what OS they run. Android or another custom Linux is okay; and I need maps for the U.S.A. So, what do you recommend?"
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The evils of CVSNT

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 3 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "CVSNT was originally a port of CVS to Windows, as well as some enhancements for the Windows environment. It is the backbone of projects like TortoiseCVS. This last spring, officially announced in late June, the current maintainers of CVSNT decided make the project a for-pay only as they migrate from being just CVS to their EVS system, which purports to integrate Subversion and other systems as well. In the process of doing so they have (i) closed down all mailing lists, even those they advertise on their website, (ii) no longer provide binaries except through back-end channels to open source projects like TortoiseCVS for distribution so those projects can continue, (iii) cut-off access to their source repositories, and (iv) done this all by saying they were advised to do so by the FSF, pointing only to a few web pages on the FSF's site. While the FSF does endorse that the GPL, LGPL, and open source projects can charge for the project, I find it highly suspicious that the FSF would endorse such a move by an open source project — one that essentially makes the project a proprietary project. What makes matters worse is that there is no tool available to move from CVSNT to a standard CVS or to any other revision control system as there are numerous "enhancements" to the RCS data backend that are specific to CVSNT which tools like cvs2svn don't understand, and without access to the source won't be able to understand. Additionally, since CVSNT became a more active project than the CVS project it was derived from it has essentially become the de facto CVS version used, stranding many in CVS and subject to the whims of March-Hare. Hopefully by brining this to the attention of Slashdot, the situation can be rectified."
Link to Original Source
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OpenMoko Freerunner dead?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 4 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "I've been looking to get an OpenMoko FreeRunner for a few months now; however, I wanted to get the A7 model as it has the Buzz Fix already applied. Sadly, The A7 model isn't available from OpenMoko with the 850MHZ radio. I recently e-mailed OpenMoko through their contact e-mail/support about this, asking when the 850MHZ will be available, only to get the following response:

There will not have A7 for GSM850 because we had stopped the phone development. Now we are focusing on our new product called WikiReader.

This after the last September's announcement of No More OpenMoko Phone and Openmoko Phone Not Dead After All. Looks like they are really just trying to clear the stock.

Submitter's note: Original Source is an e-mail I have. Please be kind with the original source I quote — it's the best I could do with slashdot's story submission form."

Link to Original Source

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Scientists report others fake data...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "Scientists, at least according to the Times of London, are doing science a great injustice as One in Seven Scientists Say Colleagues Fake Data, stating:

Around 46 percent say that they have observed fellow scientists engage in "questionable practices", such as presenting data selectively or changing the conclusions of a study in response to pressure from a funding source.

And people wonder why the science is so fought nowadays. It's interesting that only 2 percent reported having engaged in such practices though...but then, is the study author trying to justify their study? Or are they presenting the facts?"

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Science and Religion...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "In a recent essay published by The New Republic Jerry A. Coyne provides some insight into funding of science and the public groups that provide it — even those professing to be of "Christian" leaning. Regis Nicoll writes a summary for Breakpoint (an on-line and radio broadcast originally lead by Charles Colson in which we find:

Contrary to modern criticism, the scientist who approaches the world as a product of intelligence, rather than of matter and motion, is less likely to stop short of discovery. Instead of dismissing a feature that, at first glance, appears inert, unnecessary or just plain mystifying, he is more inclined to push the envelope of investigation to unravel its function and purpose.

Comments by Breakpoint readers can be found here. (Please be kind if posting to comments there; they are moderated and they don't get the volume normally does.)"

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LVM Disk Mirroring - to USB or not to USB

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing writes "I recently had a hard drive fail on me, and now working my way through the recovery process. Fortunately I didn't lose much data as it seems the hard drive mostly had stuff I didn't care too much about on it...things easily recoverable by re-install. Thankfully, it was a Linux system using LVM2.

As I work through this process I am also thinking about how to keep from losing data in the future, and have decided to setup a basic mirror RAID on the system, which is relatively new — e.g. circa 2005 — and supports USB2.0 without a problem. I am also thinking of doing the same on my home server — circa 1997/1998 — that only has USB1.1, and is in a fully operational state — though it doesn't have LVM installed yet.

So I looked in the adds this week, and noticed a Western Digital MyBook Essential 500GB drive on sale this week for $89, which leads me to my question for SlashDot:

I know USB is slower than internal drives for performance. But is it slow enough that it would not be good to use for mirroring the internal drives as part of a software drive mirror implemented via LVM2? Or should I try to go with internal hard drives for the task?

My goal is to try to keep the budget down, and right now get a mirror in place so that next time a hard disk failure won't even stand a question on whether data is lost — I just pop in a new disk to mirror to."
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CowboyNeal for President!

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TemporalBeing writes "Given the poor choice of candidates for the President of the USA this election season, we here at Slashdot should organize our own campaign and put forth one of our own as a Candidate. I propose CowboyNeal for President. (Think we can get him to run?)

Let's have some fun and really enjoy the season."
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Visualizing the Body...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "IEEE provides a pretty nice article on how IBM is playing with technology like that of Google's GoogleEarth, only for medical, electronic health records instead. From the article:

"The 3-D coordinates in the model are mapped to anatomical concepts, which serve as an index onto the electronic health record. This means that you can retrieve the information by just clicking on the relevant anatomical part. It's both 3-D navigation and a 3-D indexed map," explains Elisseeff..."You can think of it as being like Google Earth for the body," is how Elisseeff frames the mapper engine. "We see this as a way to manage the increasing complexity that will come in using computers in medicine.""
"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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Microsoft's Real Plan?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 7 years ago What's Microsoft's real plan? With the advent of .Net, the Microsoft/Novell deal, the splitting of Microsoft into three major groups internally, and the impossibility of Windows being developed the same way that Vista was for the the generation of Windows it becomes quite possible that Windows as we know it - with an NT Kernel and all - is no longer the future of Windows. Just how might Microsoft surive? Check out my full blog describing Microsoft's Real Plan.

From the blog:

It has been my speculation that .Net was the start of Microsoft's plan for how they will survive in a post Windows world.

...

Imagine (for a moment) Microsoft releasing a new version of Windows - Windows NG (for Next Generation) - that does not provide any backwards compatibility whatsoever. If Microsoft did this, they would need to be able to quickly push a lot of people to support their new system; or they could ride on the shoulders of giants - existing OS's that are already out there that have a lot of software

...

then how could Microsoft use an existing OS? What would there be for them to use? Well, there is always the BSD's, but then Microsoft would have to fork and support their own - kind of like Apple did; which could be costly. Or, Microsoft could chose a Linux Distribution (Novell's SuSE?) and make it its primary back end; add on the extra tools to move their infrastructure over (Vista's User Mode Sound and Video drivers, and .Net) and a user interface to make it look like Windows

A possibility? Sure. Likely? Only time will tell.

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Programming vs. Software Engineering & Why Software Is Hard

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 7 years ago I noticed the Slashdot Article on Why Software Is Hard and wrote a response in my Blog. Should be a good read for any techy. The blog entrie primary talks about Software Engineering vs. Programming. Needless to say, these go hand-in-hand with why software is hard. To quote from the Blog:

The key difference, however, is that the Software Engineer realizes that the "programming process" is just the implementation phase of creating software; and that there is a lot more to be done before the implementation phase can even begin. Comparitively, the programmer wants to just jump in and start writing code as soon as they have been handed a task, skipping the rest of the process, and possibly even ignoring any part of that process if anything from it was handed to him/her.

And FYI - the blog is more than just a link to the Slashdot article, and its related article. It also includes a link to few postings on OS News and its sister article, as well as some responses to a couple of the comments to that article. Needless to say, Slashdot (from what I could see) was a lot more forgiving of the original article.

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  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
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