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Comments

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Who's To Blame For Rules That Block Tesla Sales In Most US States?

TemporalBeing Re:Tesla comment aside (138 comments)

DOMA was passing a law to invalidate the Constitution's Full Faith and Credit clause. The pro-constitution small government Republicans passed more laws to cause more bureaucracy to invalidate the Constitution, doing the opposite of what they say they are. Yet again.

DOMA did not invalidate anything. It just said for the purposes of the Federal Government certain things would not be recognized.

If you read the history of marriage with respect to the Full Faith and Credit Clause, it has not been used for force States to recognize marriages from other States that the State does not wish to recognize - that does not invalidate the marriage license isssued in the other State in any way whatsoever which is what the Full Faith and Credit Clause requires. So it is completely in applicable here, especially as this is not an inter-State issue but an issue between State and Federal government.

In the case of DOMA the Federal Government was saying "yes, we recognize your marriage license and its validity with respect to the States; but with respect to the Federal Government it doesn't apply".

2 days ago
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Who's To Blame For Rules That Block Tesla Sales In Most US States?

TemporalBeing Re:Tesla comment aside (138 comments)

The authoritarian Nazis are pushing for "states rights" unless the states decide something they don't like, in which case they introduce DOMA. They claim to be for states rights, until they aren't.

DOMA did not affect States and had nothing to do with States rights. It only had to do with the Federal Government, so that's not really a conflict like you make it out to be.

Federal Government can make decisions regarding itself and its own policies, as DOMA was, without affect the States whateversoever. The issue comes when the Federal Government tries to push its policies and agenda onto the States - e.g Welfare, DOE, Social Security, Health Care, etc - through means not really granted to it via the U.S Constitution - usually through over reach of the Commerce Clause which only regulates inter-state commerce.

3 days ago
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Who's To Blame For Rules That Block Tesla Sales In Most US States?

TemporalBeing Re:Political inertia (138 comments)

First, let's remember that lawmaking politicians of influence of either party are typically what, 60+ years old? 70+? These guys still have their staff print their emails for them and are surprised when a someone says 'let's watch a movie' and it doesn't involve (at best) a VCR. Not super-quick at adapting to change.

While that may be true of some, it's certainly not true of them all - at any age. Many are very much use to using e-mail and computers.

Seriously, go meet your politicians. You'll quickly learn your assumptions above are wrong - very wrong.

3 days ago
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Who's To Blame For Rules That Block Tesla Sales In Most US States?

TemporalBeing Re:These laws are not anti-Tesla, most predate Tes (138 comments)

You cannot simply point at today's lackey Republicans as the source for these laws, nor claim them to be "anti-Tesla" anymore than 50-year-old telecom laws are "anti-Google".

Very true. It has nothing to do with who is in office today - Republican or Democrat. You can only blame them for not trying to change it to be more friendly.

There's a lot of laws like these that really should be revisited to see if they are still relevant today, and if not update or remote them from the books accordingly.

3 days ago
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Who's To Blame For Rules That Block Tesla Sales In Most US States?

TemporalBeing Re:Tesla comment aside (138 comments)

There's the conservative, state's rights, tea party wing that is in the minority.

Is that the "states rights" wing pushing to ban gay marriage on the national level to remove the rights for states?

No. It's the "states rights" wing that is pushing for that to be left to the states

3 days ago
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How Relevant is C in 2014?

TemporalBeing Re:Relevant C (641 comments)

Relevant C 2B || D4 Either learn what you're doing Or stick to the Wii Burma Shave

Fixed that for you.

5 days ago
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Stealthy Linux Trojan May Have Infected Victims For Years

TemporalBeing Re:"Running arbitrary commands" is irrelevant (129 comments)

There are a number of tools that give non-root users root access. It might be "just" sudo, or it might be some GUI tool to allow graphical administration. All it takes is a program that can hijack one of those, or just passively wait until the user issued a sudo command (so their password and access is cached), then it could jump in, grab root, stuff a module in the kernel, and all bets are off from there.

True, but those tools also require the user to have permissions to use them. For instance, sudo requires the user to be part of a group - root, sudo, wheel - that group is configurable so you can call it whatever you want. Even then it usually requires the user's password (which is also required to change the password, so you can't just change the password to be able to use sudo in your script).

Long term, what Linux really should have is the ability to have either signed executables or a manifest list that can whitelist or blacklist. This could be something like Solaris's elfsign or AIX's trustchk, where an admin can make a self-signed key and sign all executables. With this in place, on a production system, if an executable, script, or library isn't signed, it doesn't run. Virtually every other OS has this functionality in place. This doesn't have to rely on an "official" signing key either, and could just be a manifest list generated after install, similar to tripwire's database, and if some executable's signature is different, it doesn't get to run until an admin updates the signature DB.

Check out AppArmor, SELinux, etc - they have the ability to do very fine grain management of the system that really controls every little thing a user or program could do.

So yes, the ability is there. However, it's so easy to screw it up that most don't use it unless they really need it. And honestly most don't need it; the standard permission set (which still runs through SELInux, btw, just being configured with a default that matches the historical permissions) is sufficient enough to deter most things.

5 days ago
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Economist: US Congress Should Hack Digital Millennium Copyright Act

TemporalBeing Re:Would have stuck with VHS (129 comments)

And the correct market response to that would have been to call their bluff, and then enjoy the movies from those that survived. The idea that all the studios would have stopped releasing their content anywhere but in theatres is utterly implausible and was never a serious threat.

The idea is that studios would have ignored DVD and stuck to VHS and its generation loss, Rovi Macrovision analog copy protection, and NTSC/PAL/SECAM/MESECAM region lock until they could launch their own competing format with better DRM. Witness Video CD and SVCD never taking off in North America, and witness the industrywide switch from HD DVD to Blu-ray Disc when the latter offered region locking and stronger DRM (BD+, ROM Mark, and lack of rich menus on non-AACS discs).

Yes, HD-DVD did not have region lock where BD-DVD did not. However, that had nothing to do with why BD-DVD won out. IIRC, BD-DVD had a higher amount of data, and simply had a wider deployment since Sony put a BD-DVD player in every Playstation 3, so game makers and more were already pushing BD-DVD for that reason alone. There was no similar push for HD-DVD except the ill-fated Add-on for the XBox that Microsoft did. If Microsoft had made it built-in component, then there probably would have been a bigger battle between the two since the XBox sold nearly as well as the PS3 at the time.

about two weeks ago
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Economist: US Congress Should Hack Digital Millennium Copyright Act

TemporalBeing Re:Would have stuck with VHS (129 comments)

I thought [Blu-ray] got lost in the negative gap between DVD and getting stuff over the internet.

On the contrary. I still use Blu-ray because after I've bought a disc it is mine, permanently and unambiguously, and with the full force of my country's consumer protection laws behind me if anyone tries to interfere with my use of it.

That's why I buy DVD. I don't buy BD-DVDs (aka Blu-Ray DVDs). The movie industry is still having a very hard time with people buying BD-DVDs.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Introduces .NET Core

TemporalBeing Re:why would I write to that? (187 comments)

What's in it for you is C# is a very good language.

I wouldn't agree. There's a lot of things in the C# and C++/CLI (aka Managed C++) world that are just ass-backwards. If I wanted the advantage of what the .NET CLR gives me - supposed platform independences - then I'd write Java. As it is, I don't write Java b/c Java is a major PITA with no advantages over C++ or Python.

Only advantage of .NET CLR/C#/etc is that it is heavily optimized for the Windows environments so its gets a boost that other frameworks (e.g Java) cannot take advantage of. But that, again, goes against the whole platform independence.

Regarding Mono, it's not worth the bytes that make up the source. Apart from the potential legal issues (patents MS holds wrt to Mono were only licensed to Novell/SuSE users for a 5 year period, which has since expired), the APIs are highly tied to Windows. Yes, Mono has made some Gtk equivalents, but then why use it? Why not just use Gtk/C/C++ to start with?

And .net is a fairly well designed framework/libraries for getting stuff done.

Qt is by far better designed. WxWidgets and Gtk are probably better designed too.

I've said this before Microsoft has never ever acted in a predatory manner towards people using their tools. What I mean by that is they want some nominal amount of money, but they don't want to drink your milkshake. Example game companies have used VC++ and other tools to develop games that have sold hundreds of thousands of copies running on windows and does Microsoft ever demand a cut? No.

MS doesn't take a cut because you're giving it to them by using their Platform - Windows. VC++ is a write off in that manner. They invest highly in it to get Developers to write for their platform and products and write it off as part of the marketing/promotion/etc of the various products and company as a whole. If they didn't have Visual Studios then there would be a lot fewer developers developing specifically for Windows, and thus a lot less incentive for people to use Windows.

It's all nice to bitch about Microsoft but a lot of their competitors are far worse, Apple, Google, Oracle. Ever try and develop a console game? Had your app not approved by Apple, of pulled by Google. Found yourself paying license fees through the nose for Enterprise software with no good options to escape, ALA Oracle. Or try and deal with network products ala Cisco?

Yeah.

Microsoft does the same thing. For instance, one company I know of bought a product. They thought they had all the licensing taken care of, only to later discover that they needed another $500m in Terminal Services licenses. Sure, MS might not have taken a cut from the product developers, but they sure did get a big cut of the sales (possibly more than what the product developers originally got).

Or for instance if you develop using SQL Server Express (or whatever it is called now) and they outgrow what that will do; the choice? You build support for another database (e.g MySQL, MariaDB, PostgresSQL, Oracle, DB2, etc) or you help them upgrade SQLServer Express to SQL Server - which of course carries a lot of licensing and hardware requirements with it. Again, a big cut for Microsoft and one that the customer might not have anticipated.

about two weeks ago
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'Moneyball' Approach Reduces Crime In New York City

TemporalBeing Re:Looks like you have been in jail before... (218 comments)

The DA's job is to get re-elected.

That depends on where you live. The elected DA is only the one at the top of the DA's office. There are many attorney's under them that also receive the monitor "DA" whom are not elected; they do have to balance out cases against how the elected DA sets priorities, but they are more or less just regular attorney's working as prosecuters.

Again, it's all a matter of where you live. Not all areas even allow the top DA to be elected; while other areas have more of the chain in the election routine.

about two weeks ago
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'Moneyball' Approach Reduces Crime In New York City

TemporalBeing Re:Mobile police stations (218 comments)

I would guess there's relatively little crime within a block of the police station. Police should create a mobile platform and move the police stations to where the crime happens every few weeks or months.

Well, you'd be wrong.

My mom once tested out how fast the car could go (when she was a teen) nearby a police station because she figured they wouldn't be looking there. Things have changed a little since, but most likely it's still the case that they tend to turn a blind eye around the station because of the (incorrect) bias that "no would be dumb enough to commit crimes near the station".

about two weeks ago
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'Moneyball' Approach Reduces Crime In New York City

TemporalBeing Re:A tech gloss over racial profiling? (218 comments)

Why are you biased against the impartiality of the police force?

Because they have guns...

And the beauty of the Second Amendment of the U.S Constitution is that you do too.

about two weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

TemporalBeing Re:5th Admendment? (446 comments)

The Fourth Amendment doesn't require a warrant. It forbids unreasonable searches and seizures, and lays down some conditions for a valid warrant. There are warrantless searches that are considered reasonable by the court system (such as a check for weapons when arresting somebody).

You example is allowed for the safety of the officer and others (thus you are not allowed to refuse), and is already after probable cause having been established (on account of the grounds for arrest being present); however, in most cases you can refuse unless they have a warrant - even if the court would consider it a valid case of a valid warrantless search.

about two weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

TemporalBeing Re: 5th Admendment? (446 comments)

Because Western Europe is a hotbed of tyranny? I'd say that putting security into people's lives probably increases their ability to pay attention to politics.

It may increase their ability, but the reality is that people are less likely too as it placates them unless someone tries to mess with one of the things that is placating them.

This is why Social Security and Medicare/Medicaide are such hot bed political topics and essentially considered a no-no to touch politically, despite the fact that they need drastic overhauls to be sustainable (assuming that is even possible; for Social Security it isn't as designed).

about two weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

TemporalBeing Re:5th Admendment? (446 comments)

George Washington the aristocratic slaveholder who crushed the Whiskey Rebellion, screwing over farmers (including many Revolutionary War vets) to pay off bondholders?

George Washington the aristocratic slaveholder who crushed the Whiskey Rebellion

You have to be joking.

I'd say your drop of the rest of the sentence there was its own problem. The parent (quoted by me as well) was probably be facitious in their question.

about three weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

TemporalBeing Re:5th Admendment? (446 comments)

I would say no. They aren't forcing anyone to incriminate themselves. It is forcing a 3rd party (the phone manufacturer) to help extract the information. Unless the phone manufacturer was the suspect of the crime, then its not a 5th amendment issue.

Well, no it wouldn't be a 5th Amendment Issue, it'd be a 4th Amendment issue since the 4th Amendment requires a Search Warrant for the government, and the Search Warrant must have limits. A Search Warrant, btw, is only issued via the Judicial Branch not the Executive Branch.

So they could still stand up and say "no; provide us a Warrant first".

And that too would also be within the law as the law is superceded by the Constitution and any amendments therein; thus even though it may have been passed prior the Amendment, the Amendment still takes precedent and therefore limits the law and the government thereby still requiring a Warrant and changing to "the government must do what it can (within the law) to obtain the information". If they can't get a warrant than they have still satisfied the law in question.

about three weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

TemporalBeing Re: 5th Admendment? (446 comments)

or through voting for free stuff rather than principles.

People will vote on principles once they don't need the free stuff. You can't eat principles. And they'll have more time to consider their principles if they aren't spending all their time looking for food too.

So give them education + welfare and suddenly they'll develop principles.

Unfortunately that's precisely the free stuff you don't want them to have.

No, you got that wrong. You give them Welfare, Social Security, and Health Care so that you can do whatever you want to do since you can then start finger pointing at the other guy to change the conversation by saying "but he wants to take away X" instead of talking about the actual issue at hand.

about three weeks ago
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18th Century Law Dredged Up To Force Decryption of Devices

TemporalBeing Re: 5th Admendment? (446 comments)

Educated people call that ancient text The Bible, specifically Genesis. JFTR, it can be inferred in Gen 1:20-23 that chickens were spoken into existence with the rest of their fowl kind on Day 5.

And prior to land animals and anything in the seas.

about three weeks ago
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Top Counter-Strike Players Embroiled In Hacking Scandal

TemporalBeing Re:Shocking (224 comments)

Valve has done a huge job in getting rid of those sorts of hacks. But this is and has always been a big arms race.

VAC did defeat most of this crud for quite a while, but there will always be people willing to create new hacks as long as there is money or 'lulz' involved.

Best we can really do is be vigilant and weed out those who ruin the game for the rest. Be it with hacks or just general asshatesque behavior.

Most of those hacks are not really hacks - just things that were there for testing that users discovered; some things will always be possible if you put enough effort into it.

For instance, an easy way to negate the hack my friend did is to force the download of the content in upon the connection to the network; this however has two hacks: (i) doing something that prevents the download and thus forces it back into using whatever is cached on disk which can be manipulated, and (ii) adding some kind of MITM that lets you inject the content you like - this however may be at the cost of some latency which most players wouldn't like.

As you said, it's a bit of an "arms race", but the race is more people discovering what developers did than cracking into the software.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Linux-based GPS Units?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 4 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "I'm looking to a GPS unit, in-car windshield mount, for my wife. I know there are some units on the market already that run Linux, and I'd like to lend them my supports over their non-Linux brethren. However, I am quite new to looking at them and looking over TomTom's and Garmin's website does not provide any info on what OS they run. Android or another custom Linux is okay; and I need maps for the U.S.A. So, what do you recommend?"
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The evils of CVSNT

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 3 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "CVSNT was originally a port of CVS to Windows, as well as some enhancements for the Windows environment. It is the backbone of projects like TortoiseCVS. This last spring, officially announced in late June, the current maintainers of CVSNT decided make the project a for-pay only as they migrate from being just CVS to their EVS system, which purports to integrate Subversion and other systems as well. In the process of doing so they have (i) closed down all mailing lists, even those they advertise on their website, (ii) no longer provide binaries except through back-end channels to open source projects like TortoiseCVS for distribution so those projects can continue, (iii) cut-off access to their source repositories, and (iv) done this all by saying they were advised to do so by the FSF, pointing only to a few web pages on the FSF's site. While the FSF does endorse that the GPL, LGPL, and open source projects can charge for the project, I find it highly suspicious that the FSF would endorse such a move by an open source project — one that essentially makes the project a proprietary project. What makes matters worse is that there is no tool available to move from CVSNT to a standard CVS or to any other revision control system as there are numerous "enhancements" to the RCS data backend that are specific to CVSNT which tools like cvs2svn don't understand, and without access to the source won't be able to understand. Additionally, since CVSNT became a more active project than the CVS project it was derived from it has essentially become the de facto CVS version used, stranding many in CVS and subject to the whims of March-Hare. Hopefully by brining this to the attention of Slashdot, the situation can be rectified."
Link to Original Source
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OpenMoko Freerunner dead?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 4 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "I've been looking to get an OpenMoko FreeRunner for a few months now; however, I wanted to get the A7 model as it has the Buzz Fix already applied. Sadly, The A7 model isn't available from OpenMoko with the 850MHZ radio. I recently e-mailed OpenMoko through their contact e-mail/support about this, asking when the 850MHZ will be available, only to get the following response:

There will not have A7 for GSM850 because we had stopped the phone development. Now we are focusing on our new product called WikiReader.

This after the last September's announcement of No More OpenMoko Phone and Openmoko Phone Not Dead After All. Looks like they are really just trying to clear the stock.

Submitter's note: Original Source is an e-mail I have. Please be kind with the original source I quote — it's the best I could do with slashdot's story submission form."

Link to Original Source

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Scientists report others fake data...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "Scientists, at least according to the Times of London, are doing science a great injustice as One in Seven Scientists Say Colleagues Fake Data, stating:

Around 46 percent say that they have observed fellow scientists engage in "questionable practices", such as presenting data selectively or changing the conclusions of a study in response to pressure from a funding source.

And people wonder why the science is so fought nowadays. It's interesting that only 2 percent reported having engaged in such practices though...but then, is the study author trying to justify their study? Or are they presenting the facts?"

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Science and Religion...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 5 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "In a recent essay published by The New Republic Jerry A. Coyne provides some insight into funding of science and the public groups that provide it — even those professing to be of "Christian" leaning. Regis Nicoll writes a summary for Breakpoint (an on-line and radio broadcast originally lead by Charles Colson in which we find:

Contrary to modern criticism, the scientist who approaches the world as a product of intelligence, rather than of matter and motion, is less likely to stop short of discovery. Instead of dismissing a feature that, at first glance, appears inert, unnecessary or just plain mystifying, he is more inclined to push the envelope of investigation to unravel its function and purpose.

Comments by Breakpoint readers can be found here. (Please be kind if posting to comments there; they are moderated and they don't get the volume normally does.)"

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LVM Disk Mirroring - to USB or not to USB

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TemporalBeing writes "I recently had a hard drive fail on me, and now working my way through the recovery process. Fortunately I didn't lose much data as it seems the hard drive mostly had stuff I didn't care too much about on it...things easily recoverable by re-install. Thankfully, it was a Linux system using LVM2.

As I work through this process I am also thinking about how to keep from losing data in the future, and have decided to setup a basic mirror RAID on the system, which is relatively new — e.g. circa 2005 — and supports USB2.0 without a problem. I am also thinking of doing the same on my home server — circa 1997/1998 — that only has USB1.1, and is in a fully operational state — though it doesn't have LVM installed yet.

So I looked in the adds this week, and noticed a Western Digital MyBook Essential 500GB drive on sale this week for $89, which leads me to my question for SlashDot:

I know USB is slower than internal drives for performance. But is it slow enough that it would not be good to use for mirroring the internal drives as part of a software drive mirror implemented via LVM2? Or should I try to go with internal hard drives for the task?

My goal is to try to keep the budget down, and right now get a mirror in place so that next time a hard disk failure won't even stand a question on whether data is lost — I just pop in a new disk to mirror to."
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CowboyNeal for President!

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TemporalBeing writes "Given the poor choice of candidates for the President of the USA this election season, we here at Slashdot should organize our own campaign and put forth one of our own as a Candidate. I propose CowboyNeal for President. (Think we can get him to run?)

Let's have some fun and really enjoy the season."
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Visualizing the Body...

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 6 years ago

TemporalBeing (803363) writes "IEEE provides a pretty nice article on how IBM is playing with technology like that of Google's GoogleEarth, only for medical, electronic health records instead. From the article:

"The 3-D coordinates in the model are mapped to anatomical concepts, which serve as an index onto the electronic health record. This means that you can retrieve the information by just clicking on the relevant anatomical part. It's both 3-D navigation and a 3-D indexed map," explains Elisseeff..."You can think of it as being like Google Earth for the body," is how Elisseeff frames the mapper engine. "We see this as a way to manage the increasing complexity that will come in using computers in medicine.""
"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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Microsoft's Real Plan?

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 7 years ago What's Microsoft's real plan? With the advent of .Net, the Microsoft/Novell deal, the splitting of Microsoft into three major groups internally, and the impossibility of Windows being developed the same way that Vista was for the the generation of Windows it becomes quite possible that Windows as we know it - with an NT Kernel and all - is no longer the future of Windows. Just how might Microsoft surive? Check out my full blog describing Microsoft's Real Plan.

From the blog:

It has been my speculation that .Net was the start of Microsoft's plan for how they will survive in a post Windows world.

...

Imagine (for a moment) Microsoft releasing a new version of Windows - Windows NG (for Next Generation) - that does not provide any backwards compatibility whatsoever. If Microsoft did this, they would need to be able to quickly push a lot of people to support their new system; or they could ride on the shoulders of giants - existing OS's that are already out there that have a lot of software

...

then how could Microsoft use an existing OS? What would there be for them to use? Well, there is always the BSD's, but then Microsoft would have to fork and support their own - kind of like Apple did; which could be costly. Or, Microsoft could chose a Linux Distribution (Novell's SuSE?) and make it its primary back end; add on the extra tools to move their infrastructure over (Vista's User Mode Sound and Video drivers, and .Net) and a user interface to make it look like Windows

A possibility? Sure. Likely? Only time will tell.

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Programming vs. Software Engineering & Why Software Is Hard

TemporalBeing TemporalBeing writes  |  more than 7 years ago I noticed the Slashdot Article on Why Software Is Hard and wrote a response in my Blog. Should be a good read for any techy. The blog entrie primary talks about Software Engineering vs. Programming. Needless to say, these go hand-in-hand with why software is hard. To quote from the Blog:

The key difference, however, is that the Software Engineer realizes that the "programming process" is just the implementation phase of creating software; and that there is a lot more to be done before the implementation phase can even begin. Comparitively, the programmer wants to just jump in and start writing code as soon as they have been handed a task, skipping the rest of the process, and possibly even ignoring any part of that process if anything from it was handed to him/her.

And FYI - the blog is more than just a link to the Slashdot article, and its related article. It also includes a link to few postings on OS News and its sister article, as well as some responses to a couple of the comments to that article. Needless to say, Slashdot (from what I could see) was a lot more forgiving of the original article.

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